Author Topic: The significance of the Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana logo?  (Read 1909 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline frankiedahamma

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13
Does anyone know what the history and or significance of the guy in the Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana logo?


Offline Bill/SFNM

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4036
  • Location: Santa Fe, NM
Re: The significance of the Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana logo?
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2007, 11:04:16 AM »
Does anyone know what the history and or significance of the guy in the Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana logo?



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulcinella


Offline frankiedahamma

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13
Re: The significance of the Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana logo?
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2007, 11:32:41 AM »
Thanks Bill,
Any idea why they chose that for their logo or if it has any relation to pizza other than its shared Napolitano history?
Frank

Offline Bill/SFNM

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4036
  • Location: Santa Fe, NM
Re: The significance of the Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana logo?
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2007, 12:12:45 PM »
Thanks Bill,
Any idea why they chose that for their logo or if it has any relation to pizza other than its shared Napolitano history?
Frank

Perhaps because both are much beloved symbols of Naples.   

Offline David

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 966
  • What’s So Funny ‘Bout Pizza Love and Understanding
Re: The significance of the Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana logo?
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2007, 12:55:46 PM »
This very interesting website throws up some light on the possible (Lucky) link to the character as well as an insightful glimpse into Neapolitan life and contradictions. http://faculty.ed.umuc.edu/~jmatthew/naples/blog16.html#apr27

Pulcinella
On a wall in the Cave of Les Trois Ariège in France there is a stone-age drawing of a sorcerer wearing a mask. From his time to ours, from him to our own children modestly disguised for Halloween, or revelers made up for carnevale, there is an unbroken chain of masks. Made of every and anything from mud to gold, they have served to frighten, delight, beg, accompany the dead, cast out demons, and conceal lovers and executioners. From Greek drama to Balinese trance-dancers to modern psychodrama in which actors wear masks of their own faces, in every culture and in all of history, there have been masks. 

The mask took on new meaning at the end of the 16th century in Italy, when there arose a form of theatre known as the Commedia dell'Arte. The actors were skilled in the representation of well-defined characters, characters who appeared and reappeared, bearing the same name, wearing the same mask and costume, speaking the same language and, thus, establishing themselves as distinct character types, stereotypes of various regions througout Italy. For example, the stereotypical mask of Bologna is the pseudo-intellectual windbag, Dr. Balanzone, and Venice gives us the greedy and conniving underling, Arlecchino. 

One of the best-known Italian masks is the one that represents Naples, Pulcinella.  He is generally presented as a hunchback (remember that male hunchbacks are considered lucky in Naples!); he is dressed in a large, white smock and soft white hat, and wears a black half-mask characterized by a hook-nose. His character type is that of the jolly bungler, always poor and hungry, yet always able to get by,  singing songs and playing the mandolin. In his stereotypical ineptness, however, there always remains the touch of the true court jester, the "fool," who delights in snubbing his nose at the powers that be, without their ever really catching on to how much wisdom is hidden behind the mask. 

It is that anti–establishment part of Pulcinella's personality, the total disrespect of authority that seems to be not so hidden in much modern-day Neapolitan behavior. That's the reason—say some—that Neapolitans drive they way they do. The state put that traffic light on the corner, telling you when to go and when to stop. A free citizen is almost honor–bound to ignore it.
If you're looking for a date... go to the Supermarket.If you're looking for a wife....go to the Farmers market

Offline Barry

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 190
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Cape Town, South Africa
  • Pizza Passion Perserverance
Re: The significance of the Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana logo?
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2007, 02:58:56 AM »
Hi David,

Thank you for a highly readable and fascinating post !

Barry


 

pizzapan