Author Topic: Inspired. . . Again!  (Read 4756 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Inspired. . . Again!
« Reply #20 on: September 15, 2007, 09:50:13 AM »
Bruce,

All of the tools now allow users to use either a thickness factor or a dough batch/dough ball weight to determine the amounts of ingredients to use. Originally, the first tool, the so-called Lehmann dough calculating tool, could only be used with thickness factors. That tool evolved from work that Tom Lehmann and Dave Ostrander did with crust thicknesses. An example of a discussion of thickness factors and their use can be seen at http://www.pmq.com/mag/2004november_december/lehmann.php.

In the course of developing the preferment dough calculating tool, a few members who were beta testing the tool asked if it was possible to work with dough weights, which they preferred to work with, rather than thickness factors. That was simple enough to do and that feature was incorporated into the preferment dough calculating tools and all the other tools as well, either from the outset or as upgrades.

In some cases, dough recipes specify just a dough batch weight and from which it is not possible to calculate a thickness factor. For example, the dough batch weight might be 50 pounds, to make a lot of pizzas, or it might be 16 ounces, to make a single pizza. To calculate a thickness factor, you need a dough ball weight and a corresponding pizza size. In other cases, the dough ball weight and corresponding pizza size is given, so the thickness factor can be calculated. Wherever possible, I try to calculate thickness factors since several members have been accustomed to using them. The dough weight approach is technically the more accurate approach. But, I, too, started out with the thickness factor approach and became familiar with the rough ranges for that measure. For example, "thin" under the Lehmann/Ostrander approach is 0.10-0.11 (although members often use a thickness factor as low as about 0.07). "Medium" is 0.11. "Thick" is 0.12-0.13. "Sicilian" might be 0.13-0.14 or higher. But these are only rough guidelines. Deep-dish doughs commonly use 0.11-0.13 or so. Cracker crust doughs commonly use around 0.05-0.06. A Neapolitan-style crust based on using 00 flours can range from about 0.065-0.13 depending on whether one intends to bake the pizzas in a very high temperature oven or in a standard home oven (the lower end of the range is for high-temperature ovens and the higher end of the range is for standard home ovens). The Raquel thickness factor is 0.07-0.08. I have found that I can sometimes spot and help solve problems from just knowing the thickness factors in relation to the styles and sizes of the pizzas to be made.

My advice is for users to use the approach with which they feel most comfortable. And feel free to experiment.

Peter
« Last Edit: September 15, 2007, 10:35:03 AM by Pete-zza »


Offline bec

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Re: Inspired. . . Again!
« Reply #21 on: September 15, 2007, 11:06:34 AM »
I had not realized that the thickness factor was a ratio (ounces of dough per sq inch).  It seems amazing that the difference between thin and thick is about 7/100 of an ounce.  Thanks for the explanation and guidelines. 

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Inspired. . . Again!
« Reply #22 on: September 15, 2007, 12:40:31 PM »
Bruce,

Actually, the difference is greater. For example, the amount of dough for a 14" pizza (radius equals 7") with a thickness factor of 0.10 comes to 15.39 oz. (3,14159 x 7 x 7 x 0.10 = 15.39). For the same size pizza but with a thickness factor of 0.12, the corresponding dough weight is 18.47 oz. (3.14159 x 7 x 7 x 0.12 = 18.47). These numbers are for a standard type pizza. For a deep-dish dough, the calculation is different because you also have to take into account the dough that covers the sides of the pan. The math is somewhat more difficult, which is one of the reasons we came up with the deep-dish dough calculating tool, which takes all of the guesswork and likelihood of error out of the process.

Peter

Offline sourdough girl

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Re: Inspired. . . Again!
« Reply #23 on: September 15, 2007, 02:14:27 PM »
Peter,
Thanks for this explanation as it was something about which I, too, was curious.
I have a question, though, about a calculation contained in the link...
I admit that I'm not a math major, but wouldn't this calculation copied below be for an 18" pizza, not 16" as stated?  Either I'm confused or he's got a typo in the text. 

"Find the surface area of the new diameter that you want to make (letís say it is 81 inches).
Multiply 3.14 X 81 = 254 square inches of surface area.
To find the dough weight needed for this new diameter multiply the dough loading weight (0.0973 ounces) times the new surface area. (0.0973 x 254 = 24.71 (call it 24.75 ounces) of dough will be needed for the new, 16-inch diameter pizza"

Thanks for clearing the clouds away!  Your help is ALWAYS appreciated!
~sd
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Offline November

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Re: Inspired. . . Again!
« Reply #24 on: September 15, 2007, 04:10:34 PM »
That explanation was definitely poorly written.  It wasn't made clear what the 81 was even for.  81 is certainly not a surface area quantity as the explanation indicates.  The author should have just started with the diameter and worked out all the math for the reader.  The diameter of the pizza in the example does seem to be 18" based on the legitimate surface area of ~254 in2.

- red.november

Offline sourdough girl

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Re: Inspired. . . Again!
« Reply #25 on: September 15, 2007, 04:40:03 PM »
Thanks, red.november!

The quote is taken out of context, but is nonetheless still confusing, even in context.  Since the 81 must refer to radius2 not the surface area or the "new diameter you want to make" as he first makes it sound (I'd like to see the oven that 81" diameter pizza goes into!), that would lead one to believe that, since the root of 81 is 9, it must be an 18" pie, not 16" as stated. 

Thanks for confirming my suspicions.  Your help, too, is always appreciated!

~sd
« Last Edit: September 15, 2007, 04:43:11 PM by sourdough girl »
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