Author Topic: "my sauce just doesn't cut it"  (Read 10611 times)

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Offline turbosundance

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Re: "my sauce just doesn't cut it"
« Reply #20 on: October 27, 2007, 04:55:23 PM »
I prefer Stanislaus Full Red as a base.  I prefer to add Basil, Marjoram, a small amount of oregano, garlic powder, onion powder, cayenne pepper, light olive oil, ground fennel and water to to thin it out.  Beware of adding too much oregano - I find it creates and bad taste in the sauce unless used sparingly.  I also find black pepper creates a taste I don't like.

I found this website on pizza sauce very helpful:  http://www.correllconcepts.com/Encyclopizza/08_Sauce/08_sauce.htm

EDIT (2/1/2013): For an alternative Correll link, see http://web.archive.org/web/20040606225828/http://correllconcepts.com/Encyclopizza/08_Sauce/08_sauce.htm
« Last Edit: February 01, 2013, 01:37:06 PM by Pete-zza »
Ryan


Offline 2stone

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Re: "my sauce just doesn't cut it"
« Reply #21 on: December 11, 2007, 02:58:46 PM »
I have been digesting all the info.... thanks for all the great input.
I am slowly starting to get a handle on it. Still there is no way getting
around that I have to try out more of these brands....

by the way has anyone tried slow roasting as an extra topping?
http://www.cooksister.com/2007/09/slow-roasted-to.html

willard
2Stone blog: www.2stoneblog.com

Online Pete-zza

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Re: "my sauce just doesn't cut it"
« Reply #22 on: December 11, 2007, 03:27:03 PM »
Willard,

About a couple of years ago, I suggested to one of our members, Les, that he consider using oven-dried grape tomatoes for a sauce for a California-style deep-dish pizza. He did so with a vengeance, and came up with an outstanding pizza sauce (by my taste standards), as he described starting with the post (Reply 6) at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1931.msg17064.html#msg17064. The preparation of the sauce is labor intensive, but well worth the effort if one has the time to devote to it.

Peter

Offline mmarston

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Re: "my sauce just doesn't cut it"
« Reply #23 on: December 11, 2007, 04:51:20 PM »
Muir Glen sells canned "fire roasted tomatoes" I use them all the time for Mexican food and Chili but I never thought to try them on a pizza.
Maybe with some fresh Chorizo and Jalapenos?

Here's a good recipe for roasted tomatoes from Fine Cooking
If you make these with good tomatoes you end up with truly cosmic food

ingredients

3 Tbs. plus 1 cup extra-virgin olive oil
4-1/2 to 5 lb. medium-large ripe beefsteak tomatoes (about 12), stemmed but not cored
Kosher salt
Granulated sugar
Scant 1 Tbs. balsamic vinegar
3 to 4 cloves garlic, very thinly sliced
2 Tbs. fresh thyme leaves or other herb of your choice

Heat the oven to 350°F. Line a 12x17-inch rimmed baking sheet or two 9x12-inch rimmed baking sheets with foil.

Do not use unrimmed baking sheets or the oil and juices will spill out;
instead, use several shallow gratin dishes if you don't have rimmed baking sheets.

If you have parchment, put a sheet on top of the foil. Coat the pan or pans with 3 Tbs. of the olive oil.
Cut the tomatoes in half through the equator (not through the stem). Arrange
the halves, cut side up, on the baking sheet, turning to coat their bottoms with
some of the oil. Sprinkle a pinch each of salt and sugar over each half, and
drizzle each with a few drops of balsamic vinegar. Arrange the garlic over the
halves and top with a generous sprinkling of thyme. Pour the remaining 1 cup
olive oil over and around the tomato halves.

Roast in the center of the oven until the tomatoes are concentrated, dark reddish brown (with deep
browning around the edges and in places on the pan) and quite collapsed (at least half their original
height; they will collapse more as they cool), about 3 hours for very ripe, fleshy tomatoes, about 4 hours
for tomatoes that are less ripe or that have a high water content. Let cool for at least 10 to 15 minutes and
then serve warm or at room temperature.

Be sure to reserve the tomato oil (keep refrigerated for up to a
week) to use on its own or in a vinaigrette.

Quicker-cooking variation: Remove the seeds and gelatinous pulp (poke them out with your fingers)
before roasting. These tomatoes cook more quickly (check for doneness after 2 hours) but yield a slightly
flatter, less meaty—but perfectly pleasant—result.

Plum tomato variation: Substitute plum tomatoes, cut in half through the stem end and seeded. The
roasting time will be about 2 hours. Roasted plum tomato halves hold together particularly well; layer them
in a terrine or roll them up, stuffed with goat cheese and basil, as an appetizer.
make ahead tips

To store the tomatoes, refrigerate for up to a week or freeze for up to a couple of months. They’ll continue
to release juice during storage.

From Fine Cooking 66, pp. 60
« Last Edit: December 11, 2007, 05:14:45 PM by mmarston »
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Offline petef

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Re: "my sauce just doesn't cut it"
« Reply #24 on: December 12, 2007, 03:08:17 AM »
The local favorite NY pizza shop's sauce is what I'm trying to replicate but I can't figure out what to add to get there.  I know it's not a lot to go on, but all I can describe is that their sauce has a bit of tanginess to it which makes it stand out.

ManChicken, I'm at a very similar place in my pizza making and the way you stated it above
exactly describes how I'm trying to improve my sauce. I've tried many of the sauce recipes
here and experimented with my own but I can't quite duplicate that tanginess of the local
pizzaria pizza here in NJ. So my first question is, are we talking about the same taste when
comparing your local NY pizza shop to my local NJ pizzaria?  I'm talking about the taste of
the typical NJ pizza in my central NJ area. Have you had pizza in NJ? Are we after the
same thing here?

If so, just this past weekend, I had some good success at getting that taste
we are after and it might be more than just the sauce. Here's the recipe that
closely duplicated that NJ Pizzaria pizza taste.

Sauce:

 15 ounces      Rosa Cannned Pizza Sauce (Found in Acme stores)
  1 tablespoon Water
1/4 teaspoons Tarragon Leaves
1/4 teaspoons Marjoram, finely ground 
1/4 teaspoons Garlic powder
1/4 teaspoons Red hot pepper flakes, finely ground
  2  teaspoons Honey

1.) Begin by heating the sauce in a small pot.

2.) In a small glass bowl, combine the water with 2 tablespoons of sauce and
all the dry spices. Microwave them for about 45 seconds or until the temperature
reaches about 140 to 160 deg F. It's not that critical, but just don't go over 160 Deg F.

3.) Add the hot seasonings and the honey to the sauce and cook over
medium heat for about 3 to 5 minutes after the sauce begins bubbling a bit.

4.) Remove from heat and set sauce aside allowing it to cool down.


The toppings:

Also found at Acme stores...

* 16 oz Frigo low moisture Whole milk mozzarella cheese
* 16 oz Frigo low moisture Part Skim mozzarella cheese
* Bertolli Extra Virgin Olive Oil



Make the pizza:

1.) Shred the two cheeses in equal amounts and mix well.
You only need about 5 to 8 ounces of cheese for a 12" to 13" pizza.

1.) Use your favorite dough recipe and form your disk to 12" to 13".

2.) Brush the dough lightly with olive oil using a bristol brush.

3.) Top with sauce but don't put it on too thick. I estimate
about 5 oz sauce for a 12" to 13" pizza.

4.) Top with grated cheese and then sprinkle generously with
olive oil. Don't soak it but give it a good amount because this
adds flavor and allows the cheese to flow.

5.) Bake as you noramly do for your oven conditions.

FYI: I use a 3/4" thick stone which sits on 4 small tiles on the
floor of my GAS oven which is preheated to 425 Deg F. I insert
the pizza and raise the temp to 475 Deg F and cook for about
12 minutes. I watch carefully during last few minutes and when
I see the cheese bubble up and rise very high I know it's almost
ready. I allow time for the cheese to settle down and bubble a
bit in the sauce to the point where it just begins to brown
and I quickly remove it.


I'd like to hear how this recipe compares to your target NY pizza taste.

---pete---


« Last Edit: December 12, 2007, 03:23:56 AM by petef »

Offline DomeZone

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Re: "my sauce just doesn't cut it"
« Reply #25 on: December 27, 2007, 04:30:12 PM »

The local favorite NY pizza shop's sauce is what I'm trying to replicate but I can't figure out what to add to get there.  I know it's not a lot to go on, but all I can describe is that their sauce has a bit of tanginess to it which makes it stand out.

Man, I also am looking for this flavor. I wrote you in a msg. I don't know how that works, if it tells you ,you have a msg. or you just have to check. under "my messages" on top of page.

Mike

Offline petef

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Re: "my sauce just doesn't cut it"
« Reply #26 on: December 28, 2007, 05:58:20 PM »
Update/change:
In my Reply#24 of this thread I sprinkle Bertolli Extra Virgin Olive Oil over the cheese before baking.
I recently changed the oil to Bertolli Classico and I think it helps to achive the taste that ManChicken
is trying to get.

Give my recipe in this thread a try and let me know how close it comes
to the the taste you are trying to achieve. If you can't find Rosa Pizza
sauce then try some other prepared sauce to begin with. Eventually I'd
like to adjust the ingredients to eliminate the Rosa sause, but this is a
good starting point for now that others here can try to duplicate.

---pete---



Offline snowdy

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Re: "my sauce just doesn't cut it"
« Reply #27 on: December 28, 2007, 06:08:59 PM »
I have found both of these to be bullet proof.

1) 6 in 1 escalon can, mix in 1tsp of penzey's (or more to taste)
http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzeys/p-penzeyspizzaseas.html
The stuff is amazing, havent fed one person yet that didnt love it.

2) Any DOP brand san marazano's, then just cut the top where the pit is and squeeze it right on top of the pizza so the juice and flesh is all over the pie. Simple, and tastes great. I just sprinkle some oregano and basil over it, or the penzey's italian herb mix:
http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzeys/p-penzeysitalianherb.html



Offline 2stone

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Re: "my sauce just doesn't cut it"
« Reply #28 on: May 12, 2008, 01:25:10 PM »
It's been a while since any one posted here,
but thanks so much to everyone for all the great insights
posted here on what makes a good tomato sauce. I've been working
on it all along and have finally come up with a pretty decent sauce. (I think anyway)

I still call it "A work in progress sauce"

here is a link to it on a 2stone site I have been working on
for a while: http://2stone.ning.com/profiles/blog/show?id=2092473%3ABlogPost%3A190

regards,
willard
2Stone blog: www.2stoneblog.com

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: "my sauce just doesn't cut it"
« Reply #29 on: May 12, 2008, 01:58:48 PM »
Nice, Willard, thanks!   :D

Definitely looks worth trying out.  I have been experimenting with different sauces, too.  Always looking for new recipes. :chef:
Let them eat pizza.