Author Topic: Question about Randy's recipe  (Read 4648 times)

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Offline milehighwoody

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Question about Randy's recipe
« on: June 28, 2007, 01:21:18 PM »
I have made several batches using Randy's recipe from this thread pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4445.0.html . 
My problem is that when the dough is in the refrigerator it more than doubles and blows the lid off the containers after 24 hours.  I have experimented with cutting the yeast (instant) in half and still have the same issue. My finished dough temp yesterday was 83 before I put it in the frig.
Will it hurt the dough if I "punch it down" and let it continue to ferment?  Is my finished dough temp too high?  I am using a food processor to make the dough.
I would appreciate any  suggestions.
Thanks,
Woody


Offline Randy

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Re: Question about Randy's recipe
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2007, 03:13:36 PM »
Woody, reduce the water temp down to 90F for a two day rise in the cooler.

Here is the latest version.

16 oz High Gluten Flour (Hard Red Spring Wheat) or KABF or
16.3 ox Harvest King flour.

9.9 oz Water by weight warm 90-110deg.

2 TBS  raw sugar

1 TBS Honey

1 Tablespoon  Classico Olive Oil

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon SAF yeast

Using the dough hook.
Put flour, salt and yeast in bowl then run on stir.
Mix sugar, honey, and water then add to bowl on stir stop when it clumps
Rest 5 min
Add oil
Run 5 min
Rest 5
Run 7

Finish knead on a lightly floured surface and shape into a ball  Place in the refrigerator in a lightly sealed container coated with olive oil coating. for overnight or up to three days.

Remove 3  hours before panning

Makes a 16-18 pizza or two 12 pizzas

.
If using screens Preheat oven to 500 deg F  Mix together an equal mixture of Semolina, flour and cornmeal.  Liberally coat the dough ball and marble with the mixture. Shape dough and place on pizza screen and add what you want. Wait for element to come back on again then slide the pizza in the oven on middle to middle low rack.  Cook for 6-8 minutes on lowest rack in oven and WITHOUT a pizza stone.




Offline milehighwoody

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Re: Question about Randy's recipe
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2007, 03:35:25 PM »
Randy,
Thanks for the reply.  I actually varied slightly from your recipe by starting with cold water because my food processor really heats up the dough, even with just 45 seconds of knead time.  I was trying to get the finished dough temp below 85 degrees.  Should I be concerned with that?  Is the doubling normal? (although I would say mine MORE than doubles)  If so then maybe I just need bigger containers.
Thanks for the quick reply.
Woody

Offline Randy

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Re: Question about Randy's recipe
« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2007, 04:18:52 PM »
Woody, more than doubling is no problem since you should knock it down and reshape the ball when you take it from the cooler then cover the ball for a 3 hr rest. 

Almost any of the recipes will blow the lid of a tightly sealed container.  Since you are using a food processor consider going with ice water.

Post pictures when you can.

Randy

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Question about Randy's recipe
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2007, 03:39:18 PM »
Hi Randy,

There are so many variations on your recipe it's getting confusing! One comment and a question;

I used the following version of your recipe.
100% Flour
60% Water
5.3% Sugar
4.5% Honey
2.8% Olive Oil
3.3% Salt
1.6% Yeast

Question:

I used GM's Harvest King flour and the dough was on the sticky side so I assumed that this was intended for a plenary mixer. I added exactly 1/2 cup more flour and kneaded the dough by hand. It came out fantastic in terms of smell and texture. (I have not cooked it yet.) Is your dough typically done with a mixer or is it usually on the sticky side? Or was it just because I used the Harvest King flour?

Comment:

I have made a few different batches of this recipe with different kinds of honey and the flavor profile can vary quite a bit. Not all honey is created equal, so since this is 4.5% of the total recipe, you might want to play around with this to see how it varies the taste. Some "local honey" I purchase in my area tasted the best, but this could just be due to the fact that it is not as processed as commercial honey. Same goes for the olive oil. These two combined can really alter the flavor profile.


Offline Randy

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Re: Question about Randy's recipe
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2007, 03:57:12 PM »
The recipe is one of the latest but I think your % are off just a little when you look at the recipe I posted earlier in this thread. Can't do it now but as soon as I can I will post my latest version which is in the cooler now.

Dan, Harvest King flour will require less water for sure than KABF or a high gluten flour.  I like the recipe with all three flours.  I do hope you enjoy the recipe.

Honey flavor can be judged for the most part by the color.  For my recipe I choose the lightest color I can find which is usually a clover honey, but my favorite is an orange blossom honey.

Randy
« Last Edit: September 03, 2007, 03:59:55 PM by Randy »

Offline bottom-dragger

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Re: Question about Randy's recipe
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2007, 05:13:49 PM »
randy - why no pizza stone? maybe you've answered this before but i haven't found it. curious minds want to know................
joe
petersburg, alaska
sure the weather sucks, what's your point?

Offline Randy

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Re: Question about Randy's recipe
« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2007, 05:34:52 PM »
I use a screen during the warm months then a stone on few really cold weeks we have.  This pizza recipe really works well on a screen, matter of act there is not a lot of difference when using a stone at 500F.
Still a good question.

Randy


 

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