Author Topic: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!  (Read 53768 times)

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Offline scott r

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #50 on: May 03, 2008, 08:36:31 PM »
Just found this thread, and I have to say the pies are looking good!  I had Galleria Umberto and Victory Pig within the same week recently and they were both great.  They are very similar in the crust, almost exactly the same, but I really don't think Victory pig was mixing in any smoked provolone.  Good luck everyone!


Offline sourdough girl

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #51 on: May 04, 2008, 03:27:30 PM »
KC Tom,
Welcome to the forum!  I'm glad to hear from someone who also has fond memories of Tommy's!   

Are you measuring the flour and water by weight or by volume?  At 62% hydration, the dough should not be terribly soft, even after 3 days in the fridge.  In fact, I felt it was just a touch too dry, so, as noted in a later post, I raised the hydration to 63% and just that small change helped.  I also see in my early notes that the only real rise this dough did was oven spring.  I then decided to leave the dough at room temp for just over 5 hours instead of 1.5 before baking and liked that better, too.  A bit more rise on the counter and the oven spring made for a lighter yet still slightly chewy crust... less bready. 

As for the sauce, I use a shy cup for my pan size, which is 14.5" X 9.5" interior.  I use a total of 12 oz of cheese, 4 oz each mozz, prov and fontina.  I'm really glad to hear that you also think that the fontina is correct.  I also tried white cheddar and white american in the mix, but fontina gives the creaminess and a slight tang that the others lacked. 

I also want to note that my pan is dark, not shiny.  When I first started this process, before I found this site, I used a larger, shiny aluminum pan and was NOT happy with the results.  This site, and especially Pete-zza, has taught me so much... and the first thing I did was ditch the shiny pan!  Just changing that one thing improved the pizza 100%!

I am certainly glad to hear that you enjoyed the pizza and are learning to bake from scratch!  It is SUCH a great hobby... and addiction!

scott r... thanks for the kind words!  I actually started this process with a recipe for "authentic" Victory Pig pizza that I found on the internet.  That recipe confirmed what my cousin said:  the sauce is just tomatoes, chopped fresh onion and salt.  One recipe I found said that the cheese was muenster only and another said "pizza cheddar".  Not sure what "pizza cheddar" is, but muenster alone didn't taste right (too bland), plus I don't remember any orange from the rind on Tommy's pizzas.  I may try leaving the smoked prov out of the mix in the next iteration or possibly trying a non-smoked version.  Thanks for your comments!

november...  did you eat the quesadilla flambe?  Or was it burned to a crisp and inedible?  Never thought about tortilla catching fire!  Guess I'll stick to making my quesadillas in the frying pan!

~sd
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Offline November

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #52 on: May 04, 2008, 03:36:59 PM »
november...  did you eat the quesadilla flambe?  Or was it burned to a crisp and inedible?

If you're familiar with tortillas, you know that they have a layer of air trapped between each surface, so when it's exposed to intense heat it inflates to some degree.  The separation of the two layers as a result prevents the bottom layer from being affected by the heat, so I only had to scrape off the charred top layer to transform it into something edible.

- red.november

Offline jpevear

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #53 on: May 12, 2008, 11:51:18 AM »
Hi sourdough-

I'm a former NEPA resident living in Virginia Beach who often craves for many of my favorite pizzas located throughout the 'valley'.  My favorite being Pizza L'oven with Sabatini's in second place. I actually was head pizza maker at Sabatini's in the mid-nineties while I attended LCCC. [worked at the Dough Company as well]

Anyway, I make a similar pizza, or at least it looks similar to the one you have taken photographs of, but I find that I can't mimic the crust from that of Pizza L'oven.  I find it resembles an Old Forge Style taste and texture, which is good, but I prefer the Pizza L'oven style. 

Does your crust taste and feel like Pizza L'oven?  If so, I am definitely going to give it a shot this weekend. My only problem is I have a dark pan with a 12" x 12" x 1' dimension and would need to figure out how to tailor the recipe to fit my pan...

I'm not any good at doing the math or understanding the ratios involved in pizza making - Is there anyway I could use the Lehman calculator to tailor your recipe to fit my 12x12x1 pan?

I will be going up to NEPA for Memorial Day..  I will be hitting up several pizza joints in my 4 day weekend.  Can't wait!

Thanks for your help!!

And if you are interested in my Old Forge recipe, let me know and I'll post it. [it's for the 12"x12" pan I mentioned]

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #54 on: May 12, 2008, 02:47:26 PM »
I'm not any good at doing the math or understanding the ratios involved in pizza making - Is there anyway I could use the Lehman calculator to tailor your recipe to fit my 12x12x1 pan?

jpeavear,

Try this. Go to the Lehmann dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough_calculator.html and 1) select the Thickness Factor option and enter 0.12, 2) select the number of dough balls you want to make, 3) select the Rectangular pizza shape, 4) enter the 12" x 12" dimensions of your pan, and 5) enter the set of baker's percents previously mentioned by sourdough girl in her opening post in this thread (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5656.msg47944.html#msg47944). With the above entries, you should get a listing of all the ingredients and their quantities for the dimensions of your 12" x 12" pan. I usually use about 1.5% as the bowl residue compensation to compensate for minor dough losses during the preparation of the dough.

Peter

Offline jpevear

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #55 on: May 12, 2008, 07:22:34 PM »
jpeavear,

Try this. Go to the Lehmann dough calculating tool at  and 1) select the Thickness Factor option and enter 0.12, 2) select the number of dough balls you want to make, 3) select the Rectangular pizza shape, 4) enter the 12" x 12" dimensions of your pan, and 5) enter the set of baker's percents previously mentioned by sourdough girl in her opening post in this thread . With the above entries, you should get a listing of all the ingredients and their quantities for the dimensions of your 12" x 12" pan. I usually use about 1.5% as the bowl residue compensation to compensate for minor dough losses during the preparation of the dough.

Peter

Thanks very much..
Using that calculator isn't as bad as I thought it would be. I just hope my scale, non digital, is accurate when I weigh out my ingredients..

Flour (100%):      907.75 g  |  32.02 oz | 2 lbs
Water (62%):     562.81 g  |  19.85 oz | 1.24 lbs
IDY (.33%):               3 g | 0.11 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.99 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
Salt (2%):          18.16 g | 0.64 oz | 0.04 lbs | 3.78 tsp | 1.26 tbsp
Total (164.33%):1491.71 g | 52.62 oz | 3.29 lbs | TF = 0.1218
Single Ball:         497.24 g | 17.54 oz | 1.1 lbs

I based mine on 3 dough balls. 

I'm used to measuring my ingredients by 1/2, 1/4's, 1/8's - not by weight.  This may take some practice for me.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #56 on: May 12, 2008, 08:17:04 PM »
jpeavear,

You did well using the Lehmann dough calculating tool. I see that you also used the 1.5% bowl residue compensation.

It sounds like you have an analog scale. If so, I think you should come close enough. You really only need to use it for weighing the flour and water. Just remember to use the tare feature. For the rest of the ingredients, you should use the volume measurements noted. They can be approximate (e.g., 0.99 oz. is 1 oz. and 3.78 t. is a bit more than 3 3/4 t.).

If your scale doesn't work for some reason, we may be able to convert the flour and water to volume measurements. To do this, we will need to know the type and brand of flour you will be using.

Peter

Offline jpevear

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #57 on: May 12, 2008, 09:12:31 PM »
jpeavear,

You did well using the Lehmann dough calculating tool. I see that you also used the 1.5% bowl residue compensation.

It sounds like you have an analog scale. If so, I think you should come close enough. You really only need to use it for weighing the flour and water. Just remember to use the tare feature. For the rest of the ingredients, you should use the volume measurements noted. They can be approximate (e.g., 0.99 oz. is 1 oz. and 3.78 t. is a bit more than 3 3/4 t.).

If your scale doesn't work for some reason, we may be able to convert the flour and water to volume measurements. To do this, we will need to know the type and brand of flour you will be using.

Peter




Thanks Peter.  Yes, I have a 15 dollar, 11 lb Chef Mate analog scale. I've tested the accuracy with some 5 lb and 2.5 lb weights and it was off by 8 ounces. -However, 2 cups of water weighs out to be 1 lb [16.6 oz] - which is correct.  I'll do my best with this recipe.

If you ever have the chance to make it to Hanover Twp, PA  - I urge you to go.  There is no other pizza like it in this world.  I had the fortunate pleasure of growing up 1 mile away from the restaurant and would do anything to recreate this recipe.

Thanks for all of your help!!

Offline sourdough girl

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #58 on: May 12, 2008, 10:27:07 PM »
Hi sourdough-

I'm a former NEPA resident living in Virginia Beach who often craves for many of my favorite pizzas located throughout the 'valley'.  My favorite being Pizza L'oven with Sabatini's in second place. I actually was head pizza maker at Sabatini's in the mid-nineties while I attended LCCC. [worked at the Dough Company as well]

Anyway, I make a similar pizza, or at least it looks similar to the one you have taken photographs of, but I find that I can't mimic the crust from that of Pizza L'oven.  I find it resembles an Old Forge Style taste and texture, which is good, but I prefer the Pizza L'oven style. 

Does your crust taste and feel like Pizza L'oven?  If so, I am definitely going to give it a shot this weekend. My only problem is I have a dark pan with a 12" x 12" x 1' dimension and would need to figure out how to tailor the recipe to fit my pan...

I'm not any good at doing the math or understanding the ratios involved in pizza making - Is there anyway I could use the Lehman calculator to tailor your recipe to fit my 12x12x1 pan?

I will be going up to NEPA for Memorial Day..  I will be hitting up several pizza joints in my 4 day weekend.  Can't wait!

Thanks for your help!!

And if you are interested in my Old Forge recipe, let me know and I'll post it. [it's for the 12"x12" pan I mentioned]

jpevear,
Welcome to the forum!
I wish I could tell you whether my recipe is true to Pizza L'oven's but, unfortunately, I have never tasted their pizza.  I've never had OF pizza, either, although from what I've read, it's not as close to Tommy's as Victory Pig's recipe.  I'm trying to recreate a childhood memory from the original owner, Tommy's on Wyoming Ave near Schooley St in Exeter in the late-50s, early 60's (yes, I'm old!)  The only thing I have to compare to is.... closing my eyes and recreating the pizza in my head.  I feel like clicking my heels at the same time... to be transported back to Tommy's!
I searched the internet and the closest thing that I could come up with was Victory Pig's recipe, which, while I'm sure it's not the same, was at least a good place to start.  Sadly, I'm not sure I will ever absolutely nail the complete flavor experience... the "zeitgeist", if you will... of that pizza because there are just too many variables (and years) in the way.  The total recipe, (crust, cheese and sauce) are VERY close, I think...

I would really love it if you would try my recipe and tell me what you think!  I would certainly appreciate any insights you might have!

Peter, thanks for jumping in with the dough calculator help!  I honestly don't know what this forum would do without you!! 

~sd
Never trust a skinny cook!


Offline jpevear

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #59 on: May 13, 2008, 12:05:30 PM »
jpevear,
Welcome to the forum!
I wish I could tell you whether my recipe is true to Pizza L'oven's but, unfortunately, I have never tasted their pizza.  I've never had OF pizza, either, although from what I've read, it's not as close to Tommy's as Victory Pig's recipe.  I'm trying to recreate a childhood memory from the original owner, Tommy's on Wyoming Ave near Schooley St in Exeter in the late-50s, early 60's (yes, I'm old!)  The only thing I have to compare to is.... closing my eyes and recreating the pizza in my head.  I feel like clicking my heels at the same time... to be transported back to Tommy's!
I searched the internet and the closest thing that I could come up with was Victory Pig's recipe, which, while I'm sure it's not the same, was at least a good place to start.  Sadly, I'm not sure I will ever absolutely nail the complete flavor experience... the "zeitgeist", if you will... of that pizza because there are just too many variables (and years) in the way.  The total recipe, (crust, cheese and sauce) are VERY close, I think...

I would really love it if you would try my recipe and tell me what you think!  I would certainly appreciate any insights you might have!

Peter, thanks for jumping in with the dough calculator help!  I honestly don't know what this forum would do without you!! 

~sd

Well, unfortunately I am too young to remember Tommy's on Schooley Street but I do remember Tommy's Pizza Corner in Kingston.  Any resemblance? 

And yes, it is unfortunate that you haven't tasted Pizza L'oven.  It's unfortunate for anybody who hasn't tasted this one of a kind pizza.

I will give your recipe a try after Memorial day and let you know of the results.  Thanks very much to you and Peter for your help.

Offline zalicious

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #60 on: May 14, 2008, 11:35:28 AM »
Well, in my quest for a Boston type Sicilian pie, I tried this recipe due to scottr's comment about it being like Umberto's in Boston. I must say,THIS RECIPE ROCKS! ;D  I wish I could hug you, as it is the closest I've come ( although I'm working on a hazy, 20 odd year memory ). My husband said that I nailed it, 'though he's working on the same old memory :).
I made two slight changes: 1- I increased the IDY to .67 as I was only doing an overnight chill & that is the amount Pete-zza had recommended for Lehmanns overnight Sicilian, and 2- I used only 1T oil in the pan.
In following your AP with 63% hydration advice, it was perfect. I mixed & kneaded it by hand, & put it in the fridge overnight. Took it out 5 hrs or so before putting it in the pan, & then let it rest about 40 min before dressing it. I tried your cheese mix of 1:1:1 moz, prov & fontina. It was my first taste of the fontina...yummy. It was a warm mass of cheesy, melty, gooey, deliciousness :P.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2008, 11:02:56 PM by zalicious »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #61 on: May 14, 2008, 12:33:33 PM »
Jeanette,

Nice job. You are becoming a real pro with the different pizza styles you have been trying. I have found that that is the best way to learn.

Peter

Offline LPcreation

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #62 on: May 14, 2008, 02:05:39 PM »
That pizza looks awesome.  I'll be trying the sicilian again soon.   :)

What were cooking temp/times?

Offline zalicious

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #63 on: May 14, 2008, 11:04:53 PM »
Thanks, Peter :D. Those words coming from you...you have made my day.

Offline zalicious

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #64 on: May 14, 2008, 11:12:13 PM »
That pizza looks awesome.  I'll be trying the sicilian again soon.   :)

What were cooking temp/times?

 I cooked it in a 4...crap! I can't find my notes. Hold on, I'll be back.

Offline zalicious

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #65 on: May 14, 2008, 11:21:22 PM »
Ok,  ;D I preheated the oven to 475*, & put the pan on a pizza stone that was on the lowest rack. I cooked it for about 5 min, then turned it & continued cooking it another 10 min, or so.

Offline sourdough girl

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #66 on: May 15, 2008, 05:13:19 PM »
zalicious!
Thanks for the kind words!  I'm glad you liked the recipe... and the fontina!  It adds a little zip and a lot of creaminess!

LPcreation,
I preheat my oven, with two stones on the two lowest racks, for over an hour set at the max temp of 550o F.  I put the pan on the lower stone and bake for 5-6 minutes until the edges of the crust were starting to turn brown.  It looks like zalicious got great results with a lower temp and longer bake time, so it looks like either method will give you a great pie!

~sd
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Offline TronCarter

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #67 on: September 13, 2008, 08:46:32 PM »
I have made this recipe a few times in the past two weeks and it is quite tasty.  Since I am only cooking for myself, I made a half batch and it was enough for two 8" x 8" pizzas.  It worked out perfectly and tasted great, although since I am trying to be health conscious, I think I will try my next batch with less salt and see if it still tastes good.  Also I have been experimenting with different amounts of oil and I think I like the results of 2 teaspoons for the 8x8.  I have also decided that cheese on top of the toppings is the right way for this style.  It allows me to brown the cheese a bit and holds everything in place for eating.

Thanks for the post.

Tron

Offline sourdough girl

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #68 on: September 13, 2008, 09:01:33 PM »
TronCarter,
Glad you had good results!  I am always interested in how people modify the recipe, so please continue to post your results!

And, if you can, some pics would be great to see, too!

Thanks for trying my recipe!

~sd
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Offline TronCarter

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #69 on: September 14, 2008, 06:42:42 PM »
I used my last dough ball tonight and made an 8x8.  I made the dough on Friday night and I usually prepare the dough and then put each ball in its own container with a little olive oil and then let them sit on the counter for 1-2 hours and then refrigerate.  I like to let the yeast get started before cooling off.  This time I forgot about them and left them out overnight.  I'm brave (and cheap), so I decided to chill them anyway.  I used the first one on Saturday and it was great.  After only one day it had a full flavor.  Today (Sunday) was no different, the flavor was great, so I think I will start leaving my dough out overnight.  So, I took the dough out and did a finger tip flattening with a little flour and put it in the oiled pan (2 teaspoons of "Spartan Pure Olive Oil").  I let the dough rise in the pan for about 4 hours and then topped with some pepperoni that I pre-cooked in the microwave to remove as much fat as possible*.  I also added some mushrooms, red bell pepper (from my garden), white onion, and hot banana pepper.  I then topped it with 2oz of mozzarella and 1oz of muenster, ground in the food processor and a sprinkle of Italian seasoning. 

I preheated the oven at 550 with my only pizza stone on the bottom rack.  After it was up to temp for about 10 minutes, I put the pizza (in the pan) on the stone for 7.5 minutes.  Since I don't have a top stone, I broiled it for about 2 minutes at the end (I got distracted and it was a little too long and "darkened" on edge of the crust, but it looks worse than it tasted).  Here are some pictures:


Offline sourdough girl

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #70 on: September 14, 2008, 07:07:48 PM »
TronCarter,
Those pics look GREAT!!  Thanks for posting them... and I'm intrigued by the overnight at room temp, so I may try that myself as well.  I am quite certain that Tommy's dough was a same day, but I have already strayed from authenticity on that point in trying to replicate that pizza, so this idea is certainly worth a try!

I made this Tommy's clone at the beginning of this month when we made our yearly trip to Central Oregon.  The stove at Mom's cabin is VERY old (probably close to 50 years, possibly more) and this time, I had my IR gun with me!  So, I took the temp of the bottom of the oven... it was over 700o F!  I had the pizza on the bottom rack (think I used the upper rack last time) and the bottom was almost black when I took it out... but, you know, it STILL tasted good (NOT burned!) and we ate every last piece of both pizzas!

You mentioned in a prior post about using less salt... did you try that this time?  If so, how much salt did you use?

~sd
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Offline TronCarter

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #71 on: September 14, 2008, 08:05:19 PM »
Thank you.  No, this batch was made following the recipe, just cut everything in half.  I will probably get a chance to make it again next weekend and will try with lower salt.  I have never really been clear if salt actually does something in a bread or pizza dough other than add flavor, but I will experiment and find out.  Also, the dough was in plastic tubs with the lid sealed except for one corner so it didn't dry out.  When it was rising in the pan it had a real yeasty, doughy smell to it as well as when it was cooking, more than other pizzas I have made in the past of various styles.

Tron

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #72 on: September 14, 2008, 08:17:45 PM »
I have never really been clear if salt actually does something in a bread or pizza dough other than add flavor, but I will experiment and find out.

Tron,

As you will see from this article, http://www.kingarthurflour.com/professional/salt.html, salt has several purposes beyond taste.

Peter
« Last Edit: October 07, 2012, 12:11:59 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline TronCarter

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #73 on: October 06, 2008, 08:37:18 PM »
Well, just to keep you updated, I have been reducing the salt in each batch I make and seeing what happens.   Per batch (which makes 2 - 8.5oz dough balls) I started with .21oz of salt (original recipe) and have tried .17, .14, and now .105.  I personally can't tell a difference between batches, they all turned out great.  I might be able to tell a difference if I had the two side by side, but with up to a week between pizzas, it is  difficult to remember and subtle differences.  I have not noticed much of a difference in taste, texture, or rise.  I am currently using the following method:

10.56 oz Bread Flour (GM because it is less $$ than KA)
.105 oz salt  (a.k.a. 1.48 grams)
1gm IDY (SAF Instant in the red brick)
6.56 oz water

To start I weigh out the water and IDY.  I microwave the water for 30 seconds to warm it up to somewhere in the 90-100 degree range (knowing it is going into the metal bowl of my Kitchen Aid stand mixer that will cool it off some.  I put the yeast and water in the bowl and let sit for a minute or two and stir to dissolve the yeast.  While this is happening I weigh the flour and salt.  After yeast has dissolved I add flour and salt to mixer and run on speed 1 for 5 minutes.  After 5 minutes I weigh out two dough balls at right around 8.5 oz each and put them into a plastic container that has been brushed with Spartan pure olive oil.  I put the lids on loosely and let sit on the counter overnight (I usually make the dough before going to bed).  In the morning I put the containers into the refrigerator and store until I need them (I use them quickly so I don't know the actual shelf life).   On pizza day, at lunch time I take the container out and press it out with my finger tips on a floured counter (when the dough is cold).  I press it out and put it in an oiled 8x8 pan (~1tbsp Spartan pure olive oil for this size pan).  Push it out into the corners and get it as close to the final shape as possible.  Then that is it, let it be, don't touch it, let it sit out (no cover) until dinner time.  At dinner time I preheat the oven (with stone on bottom rack) to 550 and let it stay there for at least 10 minutes after it reaches 550.  While it is heating I make the pizza (as lightly as possible so as not to flatten the risen dough out).  Sauce, then toppings, then cheese all the way to the edge of the crust.  Since the cheese it going to the edge of the dough and will be touching the side of the pan, it is a good idea to make sure you oil the sides of the pan well in the previous step.  It goes on the stone for 7-8 minutes and then under the broiler for 1-2 minutes to brown up the top just a bit.  Pop it out of the pan (a plastic pancake flipper helps) on to a cookie sheet and cut.  There is a nice crunch to the crust.  I let it cool for a few minutes and then it disappears quickly after that. 

If I had to pinpoint the one most important step that can't be skipped it would be the pan rise.  I let it go for 5 hours although 3 hours may work as well, it just doesn't fit my schedule.

I need to maybe rethink where I let it cool because the bottom can lose a little of the crunch if it sits on the cookie sheet for too long. 

I didn't think to take pictures tonight, but will try to remember with the other dough ball later this week, but they would pretty much look like my earlier pictures (just a little less burned).

If anyone is wondering, Spartan is a generic brand in Michigan (not sure where else).

Sorry if there are too many details, but I would rather read a post with too many details than not enough.  :-\

Tron

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tommy's Pizza (now Pizza L'oven) circa 1960's Exeter PA (NEPA) redo!
« Reply #74 on: October 06, 2008, 09:32:15 PM »
Tron,

At 1 gram of IDY, you are using about 1/3 teaspoon. Can you tell me the cumulative hours that the dough sits at room temperature and what that room temperature is?

Peter