Author Topic: NY Pizza Dough Recipes  (Read 2380 times)

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Offline measevoli

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NY Pizza Dough Recipes
« on: August 20, 2007, 03:07:42 PM »
We are working to try to and create a great NY pizza at our small pizzeria. We have 2 stone pizza ovens that top out at about 650 degrees. Does anyone have any good recipes for dough and techniques? We would be willing to hire a consultant if one if available who knows how to make a real NY pizza.

Ciao


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: NY Pizza Dough Recipes
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2007, 04:44:07 PM »
measevoli,

There are quite a few dough recipes for the NY style on the forum, although many of them, especially those calling for a lot of sugar, may not be entirely suitable for use in the context of a commercial deck oven unless you plan to use pizza screens to keep the dough above the deck surface so that the sugar doesn’t caramelize and cause premature browning or burning of the bottom crusts. Your oven temperature is entirely suitable for the NY style. You won’t have to go to 650 degrees F. Depending on the crust characteristics you are looking for, you can go as low as 475 degrees F and maybe even a bit lower. A range of around 500-550 degrees F might be more typical.

One NY style dough recipe that was specifically developed for commercial use is the Lehmann NY style dough formulation. Judging from the many posts on this forum on that formulation, it has become one of the most popular among the members of the forum for use in a standard home oven. The Lehmann dough formulation itself, along with instructions for making and managing the dough, is given at the PMQ Recipe Bank at http://www.pmq.com/Recipe-Bank/index.php/name/New-York-Style-Pizza/record/57724/. I have performed countless experiments with this particular dough formulation to adapt it to the home environment. See, for example, the Lehmann thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.0.html and also the Lehman Roadmap I created, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1453.0.html, to help members zero in on particular versions to try based on the equipment and ingredients available to them to use.  

I don’t really think you need a consultant to make the Lehmann NY style dough. One of our members has used the Lehmann dough formulation to start a pizza business in China. When he started, he tells me that he knew nothing about making pizza dough. With relatively little effort, he was able to master the dough and to teach others who never made dough before how to do it. However, dough made using the basic Lehmann formulation is prone to high extensibility (stretchiness) when used at high hydration levels (above about 62% for a high-gluten flour). So, if you plan to shape and stretch the dough skins by hand, I would start at about 58% hydration and go from there. You can use sugar if you’d like a sweet crust, but I would otherwise personally avoid it unless you plan to go out several days of cold fermentation (e.g., 3 or more days). You might also want to think about using a dough formulation for a short-term dough (often called an “emergency” dough) to be used in case you run out of dough or something unfortunate (like a power failure overnight) renders your dough unusable. There should be little problem in adapting the basic Lehmann dough formulation to do that. In fact, it is always a good idea to use the same basic dough formulation for the emergency dough as the regular dough. There are only a few changes that have to be made to make the conversion.

As part of the adaptation of the Lehmann dough formulation to home use, another member (Boy Hits Car) and I designed a dough calculating tool (named in honor of Tom Lehmann) that allows users to design any number and types of variations of the basic Lehmann dough formulation. The tool gives the amounts of ingredients to use based on the inputs provided by the user. The tool is available at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough_calculator.html. For more detail and instructions for using the tool, click on the link in the page referenced above. For purposes of using the tool, I have used a thickness factor of 0.10-0.105. However, to make a so-called “elite” NY style, like a Totonno’s or Patsy’s or John’s pizza, one can use a thickness factor of 0.075-0.09. If you prefer to work with dough weights rather than thickness factors, the tool allows that option also. I think you will get the hang of the tool once you plug in some numbers that might apply to what you want to do. If you need any help or have any questions about using the tool, let me know. I think I might be able to come up with a few other possible candidates in case you don’t like the Lehmann formulation. The Lehmann dough calculating tool isn’t limited solely to the Lehmann NY dough formulation, so it should be easy to use the tool to modify any similar dough formulation that you might prefer to use.

As a final thought, you might also want to go to the PMQ.com website referenced above, click on the Think Tank button, and pose your request for a good NY style dough recipe at the Think Tank forum. That forum is frequented primarily by pizza operators. However, I will forewarn you that you should consider very carefully any advice given by the members on dough formulations other than by Tom Lehmann himself. Just because they are pizza operators doesn't mean that their dough formulations are the best. If you'd like, you can target your request to Tom Lehmann himself. If he is at his desk at the American Institute of Baking, he will usually respond to questions from people such as yourself. Just be sure to give him as much detail as you can on what you propose to do, such as the type, model and brand of oven you will be using, whether you will be using screens, sugar, and so forth. You can also try posting your request for a Caputo dough formulation, but I think you will find that there is very little advice rendered at the Think Tank on that subject. There is far more here on this forum.

Peter
« Last Edit: January 25, 2013, 08:45:12 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Bistro

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Re: NY Pizza Dough Recipes
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2007, 06:08:05 PM »
The dough calculator is fantastic. Thank you so much for doing this. It saves my brain some power. LOL I will being using that for my business.
Mystie

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: NY Pizza Dough Recipes
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2007, 06:26:12 PM »
Mystie,

FYI, there are other dough calculating tools, as you will see at http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough_tools.html. The enhanced tool is the closest to the Lehmann tool. It allows one to select from many other ingredients. Of course, the baker's percents have to be workable.

Peter


 

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