Author Topic: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)  (Read 133093 times)

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Offline BTB

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #125 on: April 14, 2009, 10:52:31 AM »
ME, I'm not certain. The cooked dough or crust was very "flaky," so one would wonder if there wasn't something like butter, margarine, oleo, or something else with it.  In any event, it was very tasty and delicious.  I will have to sacrifice and . . . go back for more!   --BTB


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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #126 on: April 14, 2009, 10:56:49 AM »
Loo,

I broke down the total amount of oil into 5% olive oil and 95% vegetable oil, based on information that buzz provided. Also, if the Giordano's ingredients list is to be believed, there is more yeast by percent than salt. The yeast issue is why I have been asking about how and where the dough is prepared at Giordano's.

BTB,

What ME and I are referring to is the blobs of something on the tray in the foreground of the the photo you posted in Reply 120. From the sliceny report referenced earlier in this thread, it appears that butter is used in the pans. However, buzz mentioned in one of his posts that the workers scoop butter or margarine out of a tub of some sort. That would seem to make more sense than putting it on trays where it can melt faster at room temperature.

Peter

Offline loowaters

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #127 on: April 14, 2009, 04:02:03 PM »
BTB,

That pic of the un-cut, un-sauced pie shows, from my experience, what dried "crusting" looks like after proofing of a dough ball just like Peter posted earlier. 

Peter,

I don't really know where I came up with any info that placed more salt than yeast in the formulation but an increase in yeast to 1% wouldn't be a huge increase to draw them to even percentages.  Is it possible they exist at equal proportions in their formulation or did you see info that indicated definitely MORE yeast than salt? 

Also, to adjust the oils from buzz's info:

AP Flour       100%
Water           52
Veg Oil       14.25
Olive Oil         .75
Salt               1
ADY               1

In kneading this, (actually, not this, the formulation in reply 122) I did go against the convetional wisdom around here and went with a slightly longer knead because it looked on video that this dough had some stretchiness (extensiblity) to it by watching guys toss the top layer and stretch it down in the corners without tearing.  That to me indicated some decent gluten formation.  I kneaded this in the KA for 4 minutes (not a long time but longer) with the C hook after fully combining with the paddle attachment.

Loo
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #128 on: April 14, 2009, 05:24:57 PM »
Loo,

I do not believe that it is possible to isolate a quantity of yeast from nutrition data. In my case, I tried to determine how much salt is used in the different parts of the pizza, by looking at sodium levels, and then assigning a baker's percent value to the yeast that exceeds the baker's percent for salt. Unfortunately, there is salt in just about everything--the cheeses (mozzarella and Parmesan), the sauce, the crust, and possibly the butter used to grease the pan. And the amount of sodium is in direct proportion to the amounts of the ingredients used. There are limitations as to how much salt can be used in these ingredients so you usually won't get sodium numbers that are grossly excessive. My analysis suggested around 1.25% salt in the dough. So, I just assigned a slightly higher value to the ADY. I am still trying to triangulate the quantities of cheese, sauce and cheese to fine-tune the numbers. The weights of the cheeses, sauce and crust, plus a percent to compensate for losses during baking, have to add up to the weight of the baked pizza given in the Giordano's nutrition data.

Like you, I have been suspicious of the short knead times for the Giordano's dough. I can't imagine that a commercial operation making a few hundred dough balls a day, or an equivalent bulk dough, would be able to use a short knead time with minimal gluten development. That doesn't mean that there can't be a fair amount of oil in the dough, but my analysis just didn't indicate a large quantity, at least not in the 20+% range. I would find higher oil levels more plausible in a bulk dough made on-site and divided/scaled for passage through the sheeter with a lot of bench flour. You might also recall from our Home Run Inn research how HRI had problems with their proofing equipment because of the high oil content for their doughs that apparently was gumming up their proofer. So, we can't absolutely rule out very high oil levels with the Giordano's dough. But I still have my doubts. I also believe that the Giordano's crust may be thinner than what others have been using on the forum. This would conceal a longer knead time because the crust would not come across as bready.

Peter

Offline Wazatron

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #129 on: April 18, 2009, 04:10:03 PM »
Hi all - I'm working on my first Giordano's style pizza, which is resting right now and will be baked off tonight.

However, I've just realized... I can't find anywhere posted posted in this thread an appropriate oven tempurature and estimated cooking time.

All the posts just say.. "I did this and this and this.... and then it was great!"  :-D

I am actually gonig to be baking an 8" pie tonight, in a dark-anodized slope-sided pan (from pizzatools.com). Any recommendations at this rather last minute?

Thanks in advance!

ps - I'm also scouring other threads on this one, but it seems the answer could be different for different "styles" of deep dish. Is it appropriate for Giordanos to pre-bake sasuage, or just toss it in uncooked? One big disc or rip off chunks?

Thanks all!
« Last Edit: April 18, 2009, 04:18:35 PM by Wazatron »

Offline BTB

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #130 on: April 18, 2009, 05:58:30 PM »
Just a quick reply.  I suggest you bake at 450 degrees F for around 20  to 30 minutes, but judge the pizza by the color of the crust to see if it's done as 8" is an unusual size.  Sausage cooked in a pizza at that temperature for over 10 minutes will be thoroughly cooked and IMO is better than using cooked sausage.  Giordano's puts a lot of chunks of uncooked sausage in their pizzas.        --BTB

Offline Wazatron

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #131 on: April 18, 2009, 10:42:50 PM »
Thanks BTB - turned out great, and I'll post my results here in a new thread soon!  :chef:

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #132 on: April 24, 2009, 03:00:57 PM »
I decided recently to take a stab at making a Giordano's stuffed pizza clone based on the information I had gathered and analyzed on that style. At first I was hesitant about posting my results since I was more interested at this point in time in getting the "form, fit and function" right rather than trying to perfect the clone. I wanted to get the total pizza weight correct, both unbaked and baked, and to get the proper relationship of the amounts of dough/crust, cheeses, sauce and, in my case, pepperoni. I was also using a brand new 10" x 2" deep aluminum cake pan to bake the pizza. I had buttered it well before assembling the pizza but I expected that I would not get the best final crust coloration for the parts of the crust in direct contact with the pan. That accounts for the light coloration shown in the photos below.

I also tried to make the dough as I imagined it would be made in a commercial Giordano's operation. I am not yet prepared to disclose the dough formulation I used (although I will do so once I feel that I have a credible clone), but the dough was prepared in my KitchenAid stand mixer and subjected to three days of cold fermentation. I used Gold Medal all-purpose flour that I had supplemented with some vital wheat gluten to approximate the protein content of the Ceresota/Hecker's flour that is popular in the Chicago area and used for deep-dish doughs in that area. The first photo below shows the dough as it went into the refrigerator. The two poppy seeds shown in that photo were for me to monitor the expansion of the dough while it was in the refrigerator--by monitoring the increase in spacing between the two poppy seeds. As it turned out, the dough increased in volume by about 55% after the first day, by 100% after the second day (a doubling), and by almost 300% after the third day (a quadrupling). I stopped at three days since that appeared to be consistent with what I had read about the window of usability of the Giordano's dough. The dough handled exceptionally well at every stage. It was very easy to roll out (using a rolling pin) and virtually no bench flour was needed. I could control the diameter of the skins with ease and I could stretch them without fear of anything going wrong. The dough skins looked as I saw them in the Giordano's video at travelchannel.com (as previously referenced in this thread). Assembling the pizza was a breeze. The dough skins looked and felt as I had perceived them in the Giordano's video. The dough behaved so well that there was no need to rush to complete the assembly of the pizza. I used a thinner top skin than I used for the main skin that went into the pan.

Once the pizza was dressed, I baked it on a pizza stone that had been positioned in the middle oven rack position and preheated for about an hour at 450 degrees F. The total bake time was about 25 minutes. Part way through the bake, I covered the top of the pizza with a sheet of aluminum foil because the crust seemed to be browning too fast. When I did a follow-up check, I removed the aluminum foil but forgot to put it back on the pizza. That accounts for the slight overbaking of the exposed crust. The cheese I used was a roughly 50/50 blend of shredded whole milk low-moisture mozzarella cheese and low-moisture part skim mozzarella cheese. I also sprinkled some Parmesan cheese over the unbaked pizza. The sauce was a blend of 6-in-1 ground tomatoes, RedPack whole tomatoes in puree (I used a stick blender to pulverize the whole tomatoes), some garlic powder, black pepper, pulverized basil and oregano leaves, and some sugar.

The remaining photos below show the finished pizza. I have never had a Giordano's pizza before so I have no idea what I created. The crust was a mixture of crispy parts, slightly bready parts and biscuit-like parts. The flavor was good and the overall pizza tasted fine. What would help me at this point is to get a better understanding of the finished crust characteristics. It does me no good to get that part wrong if my objective is to simulate the Giordano's style. I also noticed that my pizza seemed not to have the same height in the middle as the Giordano's photos that I have seen. I used about 12 1/2 ounces of cheese and almost 8 1/2 ounces of sauce. That was for a 10" pizza. That would suggest that I may need more cheese and/or sauce. The unbaked pizza in my case weighed about 37 1/2 ounces. The finished pizza weighed about 35 1/2 ounces. The difference represented a loss during baking of a bit over 5%.

Peter
« Last Edit: April 24, 2009, 07:47:37 PM by Pete-zza »

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #133 on: April 24, 2009, 03:05:28 PM »
And some other photos...

Peter


Offline JConk007

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #134 on: April 24, 2009, 09:25:31 PM »
Peter,
Great go at this amazing pie/pizza looks GREAT!
I also have never had the giordanos but your looks like what I am looking for high outside crust lotsa cheese.........
Keep em comng nice work!!
John
« Last Edit: April 24, 2009, 09:27:33 PM by JConk007 »
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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #135 on: May 01, 2009, 07:18:36 PM »
The photos below show my most recent effort at making a Giordano’s clone stuffed pizza. This time I used a dark sloping-sided pan (9” top diam. x 8.25” bottom diam. x 2” deep), with the amount of dough (using a modified dough formulation) adjusted for that size and shape of pan. The dough was allowed to ferment in the refrigerator for about 3 days and 4 hours. This was in line with the 3-4 days that Giordano’s purportedly uses for their dough.

The pizza was loaded with cheese (a blend of low-moisture, whole milk mozzarella cheese and low-moisture part-skim mozzarella cheese, with grated Parmesan cheese on the top of the unbaked pizza), multiple fillings (pepperoni, sausage, onions, peppers and garlic), and sauce (the same sauce as I used in my last effort). As the photos show, the innards of the pizza pretty much filled up the entire pan. The cheeses weighed almost 13 ounces, the fillings weighed about 6.8 ounces, and the sauce weighed almost 10 ounces. The total weight of the unbaked pizza was almost 46 ounces. To be sure that the pizza baked thoroughly, I baked it on a pizza stone that had been placed on the lowest oven rack position and preheated for about an hour at around 450 degrees F. That arrangement allowed the pizza to bake slowly enough for the crust to develop a nice color. I am sure that the darker pan also helped with the crust coloration. Using the stone at the lowest oven rack position also helped keep the top of the pizza from baking too quickly and overbrowning the exposed top crust. The total bake time was around 30 minutes. The finished pizza weighed almost 44.5 ounces. The loss during baking was thus a bit over 3%.

The pizza turned out very well, and was very tasty, with a uniform crust in terms of texture and mouth feel. It was an improvement over my last Giordano’s clone pizza. However, from the expansion of the dough over the roughly three-day period, and from the way the dough handled when used to make the two skins (the main skin and the top skin), I concluded that further modification of my starting Giordano’s dough clone formulation is necessary. My goal is to have the dough behave as I have seen it in the Giordano’s video at travelchannel.com. None of this is to take away from the success of the pizza. But my goal is, and has always been, to emulate a real Giordano’s pizza, not to just make a good pizza.

Peter

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #136 on: May 01, 2009, 07:24:22 PM »
And a couple other photos, including a photo of a slice...

Peter

Offline JConk007

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #137 on: May 01, 2009, 09:35:53 PM »
Love it! Need It! Wanna Try It!
Peter could you explain your (undisclosed) dough handling process and different weight /thickness if any between the top and bottom skins? hand toss? any Pre baking? or pre cooking of ingredients? Comments on the sloped pan? Does giordanos use straight sided?
What percentages were you using this time around? Were you happier with the height this time around with the increase in cheese and sauce?
Looks SO tasty, and a tad filling too!

John
« Last Edit: May 01, 2009, 09:43:44 PM by JConk007 »
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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #138 on: May 02, 2009, 11:51:29 AM »
Peter could you explain your (undisclosed) dough handling process and different weight /thickness if any between the top and bottom skins? hand toss? any Pre baking? or pre cooking of ingredients? Comments on the sloped pan? Does giordanos use straight sided?
What percentages were you using this time around? Were you happier with the height this time around with the increase in cheese and sauce?

John,

I am still regurgitating the data from the last pizza so I haven't yet determined what the next dough formulation should look like. I thought that the dough for the first Giordano's clone handled more like the real thing (based on the Giordano's video) but the crust for the last pizza was better in my opinion even though the dough was too extensible after 3+ days of cold fermentation. I believe the answer is a dough formulation that falls somewhere between the two. Unfortunately, it will take some time to re-do all of the numbers, simply because of the need to do a lot of re-calculations and have them fit within the data I collected through all of my analytical work. However, I can answer the other questions you posed.

Giordano's uses straight-sided pans that appear to be 2" deep. I used the pan I described simply because it is is the closest pan I have that is dark and does not produce an excessive amount of pizza for me to eat. I have a beautiful 2" deep, dark anodized straight-sided deep-dish pan from pizzatools.com/Lloyd's, but it would produce far more pizza than I can comfortably eat, even with leftovers. The first pizza I made used a 9" x 2" pan but it was light colored and not yet seasoned enough to produce the desired crust coloration, even with ample greasing of the pan with butter, without removing the pizza from the pan toward the end of the bake to achieve that desired degree of crust coloration. That is still an option because I found that I could remove the baked pizza from the pan without any difficulty or with the crust splitting during such removal. I found this true of both the straight-sided and sloping-sided pans I used.   

To prepare the dough for the two Giordano's clone pizzas I described, I first determined how much dough I would need for the particular pan based on the data I got from my analytical work. I found that in both cases I did not have to carve out a piece of the bulk dough to use for the top skin. The bulk dough in both cases was very malleable, much like putty, and I was able to carve out the piece of dough for the top skin after the bulk dough was taken out of the refrigerator. That was good news since that avoided having to use two storage containers, one for the dough for the top skin and one for the dough for the main skin. To determine how much dough to use for the top skin, which was much thinner than the main skin, I determined what diameter of the top skin I would need to cover the top of the pizza and the sides of the pan up to and slightly beyond the top rim of the pan where it would be joined with the main skin. In my case, that diameter was about 10.5", or a radius of 5.25". Purely as an estimate, I decided to use a thickness factor for the top skin of 0.05. I then performed the following simple calculation of the amount of dough that I would need for the top skin:

Top skin weight = Pi (3.14159) x 5.25 x 5.25 x 0.05 = 4.33 oz./122.74 g.

I simply carved out a piece of dough of that weight from the bulk dough ball and set it aside. That was it. The rest of the dough, with enough to drape over the top of the rim of the pan by about an inch, was used for the main skin. When I ultimately joined the two skins after adding the cheeses and fillings, there was some excess dough that I simply trimmed off with a sharp knife, just as is shown in the Giordano's video. Both the main skin and the top skin were rolled out using a rolling pin, which simulated the Anets sheeters/rollers that Giordano's uses in its restaurants.

I did not pre-bake either the main skin or the top skin (without sauce) but I did partially cook the vegetables in olive oil. I also partially cooked the sausage to the pink stage, mainly to be able to reduce the fat content, and I nuked the pepperoni slices in the microwave for the same reason. These are just personal preferences and an effort on my part to reduce fat in my diet, even at the expense of the loss of some flavor. In the past, I have even replaced animal fat with olive oil so as to retain at least some fat mouth feel and flavor.

Next time, I think I will go back to a plain or pepperoni pizza just to see how the crust bakes up with about an inch of exposed crust between the top of the pizza and the rim of the pan. Loading up the pizza as I did the last time, avoided that test. But I plan to increase both the amount of cheese and sauce to get the desired overall weight of the pizza based on the Giordano's nutrition data.

Peter




Offline JConk007

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #139 on: May 02, 2009, 01:48:08 PM »
Thanks for the details Peter, That helps me to understand how to calculate the top skin, its just like any other based on size with a .05 thickness factor,  .1 ish for the bottom skin? I have 2 -9"  x 1.5  and a 12" x2"  is the smalllest I have with a 2" side. Do you think 1.5 inches is appropriate for the hieght or must go 2" with the crust? Thanks again
john
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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #140 on: May 02, 2009, 02:32:28 PM »
John,

It is somewhat difficult to calculate the thickness factor for the main skin by itself because there is an excess of dough for both skins that gets trimmed off at the point where they come together at the rim of the pan. I took a lot of measurements at a lot of different points while I was assembling the last pizza so I will have to examine my notes to see if there is a way to calculate the thickness factor for just the main skin. In practice, that value may not mean all that much because you wouldn't want to make just the exact amount of dough. You want some extra dough in the main skin to hang over the side of the pan and you may want at least a bit of extra dough for the top skin just to be on the safe side. When I used the deep-dish dough calculating tool, I entered a value for the depth of the dough in the pan that was 2.5" even though that was more than the depth of the pan itself (2"). The 2.5" value gave me the extra dough to hang over the side of the pan. I thought that that was a neat little trick.

To be true to the Giordano's style, you would want to use a pan with a depth of 2". However, there is no reason why you can't use a pan with a depth of 1.5". You will just have to decide how deep you want the pizza to be in the middle with all of the cheeses and fillings. That will determine the amount of exposed crust at the sides of the pizza. If you look at the Giordano's video, you will see examples of pies where the top skins are higher up on the pizza, most likely because of a lot of fillings, and where the top skins are low on the pies, most likely because of few or no fillings. The two pies I made conformed to both of those scenarios.

What I found interesting about the Giordano's stuffed pizza is that the top skin is so thin that with all of the cheeses and sauce and crust melding together when consumed you can't even tell the top skin is there. You really have to look carefully to find the top skin. Most people could care less and just eat the pizza. Maybe the true value of the top skin, apart from its appeal as a marketing tool (its connection to stuffed Italian Easter pies and the like), is just keeping the sauce all in one place and not having it seep into the rest of the pizza. There are slits that are formed in the top skin but I didn't detect any significant seepage via those slits.

I forgot to mention in my last post that for the last dough I made I added the oils directly to the flour and combined with a fork before adding the water. I have not read anything about how the doughs are made at Giordano's, but I would imagine that one viable option is to use a pre-mix that already contains the oils (there is a lot of food technology out there to do this). That mix could also contain the yeast, flour and salt. Such a mix would make life a lot easier for the people who have to make the dough since all they would have to do is add water at the right temperature. I used rehydrated ADY for both of my Giordano's clone doughs but I believe that it may be possible to use it dry in a pre-mix if the dough is to be given a long fermentation time. I have tested this idea before and it does work. Maybe I will try that with the next iteration of the Giordano's clone dough. Another possibility is to just use IDY. Maybe Giordano's is already using IDY.

Peter

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #141 on: May 02, 2009, 03:17:33 PM »
John,

After my last post, I went back to my notes and saw that I had written down how much scrap dough I ended up with for the last pizza. I then took the total dough weight and subtracted the value of the weight of the top skin and the weight of the scrap dough to come up with a figure that perhaps fairly accurately represents the amount of dough I used to make the main skin. I then used the deep-dish dough calculating tool with the original baker's percents and pan data (but no bowl residue compensation) and, by playing around with the thickness factor box, was able to come up with a thickness factor value that yielded the correct amount of dough. That thickness factor was 0.116532. Whether that is high or low I have no idea but ultimately it would be helpful to have a workable thickness factor value since it would allow one to calculate an amount of dough to use for the main skin for any given size and shape of pan and, by using the depth of dough feature of the calculating tool as previously discussed, add an amount of extra dough so that the rolled out main skin overlaps the side of the pan. The top skin can be calculated separately, as before, using its own thickness factor, and its weight added to the weight of the main skin. The total weight can then be used in the deep-dish dough calculating tool to come up with the amounts of ingredients for the entire dough (main skin and top skin).

Peter


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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #142 on: May 03, 2009, 08:30:03 AM »
Peter,
Yes thanks, thats why I was asking about the thickness factor I can calculate top and bottom weight and add together for the calculator just as you mention. So I'll use .11 and .06 and thats takes care of the weight but rest of the calculator remains a mystery  ??? I do like the looks of the second formulation, but I willl be patient. If you read the other post on the Florida Giordanos the member mentioned the crust was bland and tasteless, but BTB loved his visit? I also agree that the top crust goes a bit unnoticed (unless you look for it) based on the the texture and the quantity of cheese and ingredients
I am liking the new   Peteordanos style  :D
John
oh I have never had a real Giordanos either ! but my local makes a 16 stuffed that is awsome!! I'll get a shot of it
« Last Edit: May 03, 2009, 08:32:51 AM by JConk007 »
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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #143 on: May 03, 2009, 09:23:30 AM »
So I'll use .11 and .06 and thats takes care of the weight

John,

As noted earlier, the set of values I last used were roughly 0.117 (main skin) and 0.05 (top skin). Like you, I have never had a Giordano's pizza, so I don't know whether my numbers are accurate. If you'd like, I can give you the baker's percents I last used but I will be changing them the next time I try another Giordano's clone.

Peter

Offline toekneemac

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #144 on: May 09, 2009, 10:32:28 PM »
Any tips on rolling the dough?  I try to roll it and it likes to contract on me.  Hard to handle.  My recipe is:

2c flour
1/2 tea yeast
1/2 tea salt
1/2 cup water
3 tbsp oil

Combined and I let rise for 2 hours, refrigerated overnight, and brought to room temp.

Any tips?  Gladly appreciated.

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #145 on: May 09, 2009, 10:50:55 PM »
toekneemac,

Based on the limited information you provided, I don't see any reason why you had problems rolling out the dough. The hydration and oil quantity seem to be sufficient to allow you to roll out the dough without excessive elasticity. Maybe you can explain more fully what you mean by "Hard to handle." It's possible that you need a longer fermentation time. The dough used by Giordano's is cold fermented 3-4 days.

Peter

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #146 on: May 09, 2009, 11:10:25 PM »
toekneemac,

Based on the limited information you provided, I don't see any reason why you had problems rolling out the dough. The hydration and oil quantity seem to be sufficient to allow you to roll out the dough without excessive elasticity. Maybe you can explain more fully what you mean by "Hard to handle." It's possible that you need a longer fermentation time. The dough used by Giordano's is cold fermented 3-4 days.

Peter

Great information about the 3-4 days fermentation.  Thanks.  Actually, I tried to roll it out again, with 1/8" bands on my rolling pin.  Seemed to work ok.  I think I was trying to roll more of the dough than it was capable of! lol

Offline mrmojo1

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #147 on: June 21, 2009, 03:31:46 AM »
my 1st attempt! not the prettiest.  i used loos recipe, and did 20% semolina.  the crust tasted great.  i should have used the 1 inch pan as i orignally calculated for. as a result both skins were stretched a bit too much.  and one side fell after it hit the oven.  sauce was 6-1 which i drained for 1/2 hr and then i blended, for i prefer more of a puree.  i needed more sauce. I used whole milk shredded mozz and sweet italian sausage.   25 min on middle rack on the stone that was preheated for an hour at 450 seemed perfect.  looks aside it was delicious.  friends stopped by and this was their 1st stuffed.  they enjoyed.  i have 3 more dough balls....we'll see if i cant get it out of the pan next time.  it wasnt sticking but man, i dont have that move down yet!! thanks for all the recipes and advice!!
"My Doctor says I swallow a lot of aggression.  Along with a lot of pizzas!!"

Offline mrmojo1

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #148 on: June 25, 2009, 12:28:05 AM »
well i used the smaller pan, on my 2nd try and it was much better....although i slit the top skin in various spots it obviously wasnt enough.   tasted really good though! sweet italian sausage, whole milk mozz, semolina 20% in the dough, dough aged 3 days in fridge.  6-1 crushed tomatoes!!  and i got it out of the pan!  the 6-1 sauce i added no salt this time, as well as drained less.  but the flavor was fantastic! 6-1 RULES!!!  again thanks or all the help!
"My Doctor says I swallow a lot of aggression.  Along with a lot of pizzas!!"

Offline mrmojo1

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Re: My Giordano's Style Pizza's (with pics)
« Reply #149 on: June 25, 2009, 01:42:56 AM »
i think i need to move the rack down 1 increment i think with this new pan. i put foil on the top for the last 5 min. b/c the top was browning much faster.   on the whole it needed a little more time in the oven. the crust has some white spots!!   
"My Doctor says I swallow a lot of aggression.  Along with a lot of pizzas!!"


 

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