Author Topic: Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers  (Read 8994 times)

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Darrellthecrabber

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Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« on: August 20, 2003, 09:36:11 PM »
Just found Steves pizza site last night. Now I have got to get the Kitchen Aid mixer I have been wanting. I see a 5qt that flips up, a 5qt that goes up (both about 325 W motors) and down with a crank and 6 qt with the crank 525W motors. Whats good or all they all good for small batch pizza. I do have a 11qt. Cusineart food processor and have made dough with that .


Offline DKM

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2003, 10:36:00 PM »
I have the 5 qt that flips up.  Had it for for 7 years works great.

DKM
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Darrellthecrabber

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2003, 08:27:12 PM »
Bought a 350 watt 5 qt "Professional"  last night a shopping club Costco 249.00. I made Steves thin dough and it wanted to stall as the ball of dough got big enough to go round on the hook (about 15minutes). It was straining and would hang up and stop for a second then go on..I should have stopped it. The dough ball was really stiff. Lucky no bad smells ..did not get too hot and runs fine. Next time I will stop at the point it starts to ball up with that dough mix. The thin crispy mixes have the least water.

Offline pizzaluvr

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2003, 08:24:59 AM »
I have a 300 watt Kitchen Aid (tilt up) and have had little problem mixing dough with it.  It does occasionally bog-down, but it has never completely stalled, though the motor does get warm.  That being said, you should still probably buy the biggest wattage one you can afford.  
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Offline Steve

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2003, 10:46:39 AM »
Unfortunately, the KitchenAid stand mixers of today are nothing like the KitchenAid mixers of yesteryear. KitchenAid mixers were once manufactured by Hobart. The old Hobart mixers were heavy duty and had a fixed-speed motor and a gear-driven transmission. In low gear, these things were unstoppable! Today's KitchenAids have a variable-speed motor and a fixed-gear. Slowing the motor speed is a very bad design. It's like putting your car in 3rd gear and trying to pull a trailer from a stop... the motor is going to bog down and stall.

If you've got money to burn, get yourself a Hobart N-50 mixer... it's the KitchenAid of yesteryear.

http://www.hobartcorp.com/hobartg5/pr/n50.nsf/home

 ;D ;D
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Offline Randy

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2003, 02:52:17 PM »
Steve's thin crust is good to eat but my seven year old Heavy Duty Kitchenaid does have its moments working the dense dough.  

Darrel I think you will find all other doughs will not a problem.
I have run 6 cup flour recipes without any problem.

Randy

Offline DKM

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2003, 05:12:06 PM »
My mixer, hasn't had any real problem with the dough, or at least no more then our large Hobart did at Pizza Inn.

DKM
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Offline YoMomma

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2003, 09:24:02 AM »
Do you know what year Hobart stopped manufacturing KA?

Offline Steve

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2003, 11:58:41 AM »
Do you know what year Hobart stopped manufacturing KA?

1986 (Whirlpool bought the KitchenAid name/line from Hobart)
« Last Edit: August 26, 2003, 12:01:02 PM by Steve »
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Offline Steve

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2003, 12:11:04 PM »
HOBART
In 1908, Herbert Johnson, an engineer and later President of the Hobart Manufacturing Company in Troy, Ohio, was in need for a laborsaving device for mixing bread dough. The result was an 80-quart mixer. Seven years later, professional bakers were using his invention for an easier, more thorough and sanitary method to mix dough.

WWI
After World War I, the company turned to peace-time production; and, in 1919, the Troy Metal Products Company, a subsidiary of Hobart Manufacturing, began production of the "H-5", the first in a long series of non-commercial stand mixers utilizing "planetary action." The mixer rotates the beater in one direction while moving the mix around the bowl in the opposite direction.

People often ask how the "KitchenAid" trade name was developed. While testing the H-5 model, wives of Troy Company executives discussed what to call it. One commented, "I don't care what you call it, but I know it's the best kitchen aid I have ever had." The rest is history.

The KitchenAid H-5 rolled off the assembly line at a rate of four per day and cost $189.50. Then, as now, unsurpassed quality was the goal. Nothing was shipped to customers without testing and retesting.

To attract the modern woman of the 1920s, advertising was developed that emphasized how the KitchenAid stand mixer stirs, beats, cuts, creams, slices, chops and strains by electricity. By the late 1920s, kitchens were growing smaller. So, KitchenAid responded with a downsized, lighter mixer that became so popular the H-5 production was stopped.

Then, throughout the 1930s, KitchenAid introduced new, less expensive models that were within the means of many American households. In the midst of the great dust bowl years, KitchenAid recruited the nationally Egmont Arens to design three new stand mixer models. These designs were so timeless in their simplicity and function that they remain virtually unchanged to this very day.

Since 1937, every KitchenAid mixer model introduced has allowed for fully interchangeable attachments, a tribute to common sense and management of resources. Innovation has always been a hallmark of KitchenAid portable appliances. In the mid-1950s, unique new colors were introduced. Households of the day were soon populated with Petal Pink, Sunny Yellow, Island Green, Satin Chrome and Antique Copper KitchenAid mixers, bold departures from the traditional white appliances.

Whirlpool
In  1986, Whirlpool expanded its brand base by purchasing the KitchenAid division of the Hobart Corporation and acquiring the Roper brand name in 1989.  The three-tiered brand structure now gave customers a clear choice of high-end (KitchenAid), popular (Whirlpool) and value-oriented (Roper) home appliances.
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Offline itsinthesauce

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2003, 06:16:11 PM »
Amazing story. I have a Kitchen Aid from 1945 that still works....it was my mothers. I still have the cookbook that came with it.

Next topic will be the Nesco Roaster. LOL

cliff

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #11 on: October 29, 2003, 05:43:08 PM »
 Watch out kneeding high glutton dough with your Kichen Aid mixer. I've had to replace a planitary gear in my Kichen Aid mixer because to dough was too stiff for the mixer to handle.I used a pizza dough recipe, that called for 6 cups of flour.  

Offline Randy

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #12 on: October 29, 2003, 06:43:56 PM »
It would be nice to get a Hobart.
 ;D
Randy

Offline Randy

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #13 on: October 29, 2003, 06:47:23 PM »
Was it a plastic gear?

Randy

cliff

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #14 on: October 29, 2003, 07:03:53 PM »
Yes, it was a plastic gear.I was really surpised they would use plastic gears.

Offline itsinthesauce

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2003, 07:24:38 PM »
Same thing happened when I made the Howard dough.

cliff

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #16 on: October 29, 2003, 07:46:58 PM »
I would have thought Kitchen Aid was a "heavy" duty mixer. Clearly it is not.

Offline itsinthesauce

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #17 on: October 30, 2003, 08:16:16 AM »
It's fine as long as you're doing a wet dough, but struggles with a 4-5 cup dryer dough.

cliff

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #18 on: October 30, 2003, 07:38:00 PM »
I've been kneading my dough in small batches to prevent another stripped gear. I wonder how bread machines handle heavy dough ?                     cliff

Offline Randy

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Re:Kitchen Aid Stand Mixers
« Reply #19 on: October 30, 2003, 07:53:22 PM »
I ran across this. Maybe you could get metal replacement gears.  Might be worth calling them.
http://shop.store.yahoo.com/mendingshed/kitaidparts.html

Randy


 

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