Author Topic: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza  (Read 572914 times)

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Offline Buffalo

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #350 on: January 19, 2006, 12:58:04 PM »
Pete-zza;
Thanks very much for your quick response.  I look forward to your progress updates.
Buffalo ;D


Offline chiguy

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #351 on: January 19, 2006, 01:17:14 PM »
 Hi Peter,
 I checked the recipe Leahman posted for TAKE N BAKE at PMQ and noticed a discrepancy in the finished dough temperature. The formula states, Water: 58-63%,(Water temperture should be adjusted to give a finished dough temperature of 75-80F.
Then in the next paragraph it states the finished dough temperature should be 80-85F?? This temperature difference will obviously make a difference, especially with this type of pizza.
 I am looking through a book i recieved from General Mills that states finished dough temperatures for Take n Bake dough should be between(72-80F).

 During a visit to a friend last year i was able to try PaPa Murphy's, here is what i noticed. The sauce is not sauce, it is almost straight paste. Very thick like brick mortar. It was applied with a triangle knife, something i have never seen at a kitchen store. If i had to take a guess on the type of flour i would say it was probably a low quality bread flour. The pizza also noticably had alot of oil, it was definetly present on the pallet. The cheese was a blend, with very little mozzarella present. I would guess the water to be just under 60%, i say this because the dough did not seem over extensible and the way the kids were able to handle it. The dough appeared to be placed in a pizza press, although it was not present in the front of the shop. If you decide to take one and bake one, make it a small and have a back up plan. It is not a very good pizza in my opinion. I do feel Take N Bake is still a good concept and there is alot of room for improvement with this franchise and new concepts for the future.   Chiguy

Offline Wallman

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #352 on: January 19, 2006, 02:04:08 PM »
Peter,
I'll check out your post again. I think I got a little carried away with the "pulse" button.  :)

I do indeed use a silcon pastry mat for shaping the dough, it came from Sur la Table and is designed for making pies and tarts.   The mat has linear measurements on the sides and diameter measurements, circles up to 12 inches, in the middle (under the pizza skin in the photo).  Lightly floured it makes a convenient work surface.  Plus clean up is easier, I just rinse it off in the sink. You could cook on it if you had a really big cookie sheet.

I also have some smaller Silpat (and knock-off brand) baking sheets that I use for cookies, etc.  They are very handy for baking. Here's a link if anybody wants one for themselves.

http://www.surlatable.com/common/products/product_details.cfm?PRRFNBR=11618

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #353 on: January 19, 2006, 02:09:45 PM »
chiguy,

You have a sharp eye. I saw the same discrepancy and looked into it, for the same reason that you were suspicious. Judging from this post at the PMQ Think Tank, it looks like 80-85 degrees F is the correct range: http://www.pmq.com/cgi-bin/tt/index.cgi/noframes/read/23323. I think that range is used to be sure that the gluten in the dough relaxes enough to permit skins to be made more easily, especially if a strong flour is used. Tom usually recommends a flour with 13-14.5% protein.

Papa Murphy's is often given more credit for its marketing than for the quality of its take-and-bake pizzas. So I am not surprised to hear your opinion on Papa Murphy's pizza. I also suspected that the hydration was lower than what I used the other day. I used 63%. I will lower it the next time.

Peter

Offline chiguy

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #354 on: January 19, 2006, 04:48:29 PM »
 Hi Peter,
 I do know GeneralMills definetly says use 72-80F as a finished dough temp. So to play it safe i would tend to be at 80F, right in the middle. I guess the flour could be HighGluten judging by it's haneling ability but it certainly did not reflect in the finished crust. Like i said the water seemed a bit lower than 60%, i think they make up for the lower hydration with the addition of oil 3-5% according to Leahman recipe. I assume the balance of the water and oil % they use, has alot to do with the handeling and keeping quality of the pizza? The oil definetly has a presence in the finished crust and gives it a very tender bite, i never detected olive oil though.  chiguy

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #355 on: January 19, 2006, 07:52:20 PM »
chiguy,

Tom Lehmann was asked a question about take-and-bake pizza doughs and, as part of his answer, he said the following about the oil:

As for the increased oil content,...... it helps to prevent/impede the migration of moisture from the sauce into the dough, it provides for a better flavor due to the flavor of the oil (if using a flavored oil such as olive oil), it also improves the mouthfeel of the crust, and tends to give it a shorter (tender), more crispy texture. Very low or no oil will give the crust a hard, crispy texture. And lastly, people like fat.

While Tom didn't mention it, I suspect that the increased levels of oil will also help make the dough more extensible, especially if a strong flour is used to make the take-and-bake dough.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #356 on: January 24, 2006, 10:41:02 AM »
Fellow member Buffalo requested today on another thread that I post a Lehmann dough formulation for a 30-inch pizza. For Buffalo and anyone else with the wherewithal to make such a size, I have posted the 30-inch dough formulation below. I elected to use a thickness factor of 0.105 to make the dough a little bit thicker and possibly a bit easier to handle when being opened up to 30 inches. I'd love to see someone give the 30-incher a try just to see if the formulation scales up well to that size. I know that there is such a thing as a 30-inch screen--as I discovered recently when I researched the matter--so there is at least the possibility of using a screen, even if it is just a mechanism to get the pizza into the oven (and possibly later transferred off of the screen directly onto the stone of a deck oven).

Buffalo's 30-inch Lehmann NY Style Dough Formulation
100%, High-gluten flour (KASL), 44.76 oz./2.80 lbs. (1256.55 g.)
63%, Water, 28.17 oz./1.76 lbs. (798.56 g.), a bit over 3 1/3 c.
1%, Oil, 0.45 oz. (12.68 g.), a bit less than 2 3/4 t.
1.75%, Salt, 0.78 oz. (22.18 g.), a bit less than 4 t.
0.25%, Instant dry yeast (IDY), 0.11 oz. (3.17 g.), a bit over 1 t.
Total dough weight = 74.22 oz. (2104.14 g.)
Thickness factor (TF) = 0.105

Peter

Offline abc

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #357 on: January 29, 2006, 11:10:14 AM »
30" pizza?  I take it someone has access to a commercial oven.  But if this is going to be done in the home, what you got at home?

Offline Milanocookies56

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #358 on: February 01, 2006, 06:28:52 PM »
Tonight I made two pizzas using the Lehmann 16 inch recipe split in half with two dough balls so each pizza was roughly 8 inches
Half cheese half diced pepperoni


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #359 on: February 01, 2006, 07:10:52 PM »
Milanocookies56,

Very nice. How did they taste?

Was there a particular reason for picking 8 inches for the size of your pizzas? I ask this question because the amount of dough for a 16-inch pizza will make two roughly 12-inch pizzas with the same crust thickness as the 16-inch. Using half of the dough for an 8-inch pizza will yield a crust that is about double the thickness of the 16-inch. In other words, there is not a direct linear correlation between the 16- and 8-inch sizes. Of course, there is nothing wrong with making 8-inch pizzas if that is what you were striving for. They should still taste great.

Peter

Offline Milanocookies56

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #360 on: February 01, 2006, 07:21:47 PM »
Oh well then I guess they were 12 because I just split the dough in half but they tasted great on the second one I wish I would have a put it on the screen for five mintues and the stone for 2 but i just kept it on the screen the whole 7 the bottom was browned but i prefer mine a little browner

Offline Wallman

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #361 on: February 14, 2006, 09:12:10 PM »
I found using the screen/stone method with Pete's Tom L. NY style dough worked very well. I preheated my oven to 550 for an hour and baked the pizza on a 16 inch screen for around 5 minutes. I then transfered the pizza to my tiles on the bottom rack.  As soon as the pizza hit the tiles the cheese started to bubble and you could hear the dough cooking.  After 2 - 3 minutes the bottom of the pizza had a nice char.  I cooked five pizzas this Saturday for my birthday and they came out great.  The last couple pizzas took a bit longer as the oven cooled down from use, so just keep an eye on your pizzas if you're doing more than one or two. Unfortunately all my guests ate them before I could take pictures.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #362 on: February 19, 2006, 04:10:06 PM »
The photos below show the results of my latest undertaking to make a take-and-bake version of the Lehmann NY style dough. What I have been trying to accomplish along these lines is to 1) produce a take-and-bake pre-formed Lehmann dough skin, and even a fully dressed skin, at least one day, and possibly two or three days, before baking; and 2) bake the pizza in a standard home oven, on the middle oven rack position, at around 425 degrees F, for about 10-15 minutes, without the need for a stone/tiles or pizza peel.

At this point, I would also prefer not to use a special leavening system such as WRISE, as is frequently used by commercial take-and-bake operators to insure that the dough rises sufficiently in the oven in the event consumers “abuse” the pizzas by failing to use them properly and in accordance with the recommended handling and baking procedures.  (As background for this subject, readers may wish to refer to Replies 343, 347, 349 and 355 in this thread, as well as intervening posts.)

My experience to date is that take-and-bake pizzas based on a yeast-leavened dough tend to bake up crispier than most pizzas. From what I have read, this seems to be inherent in a lot of take-and-bake pizzas, particularly if a product like WRISE is not used. Also, the manner in which the doughs are made for this style of pizza, and particularly the use of short fermentation times, tends to preclude achieving pronounced flavors in the crust. I have yet to find a good solution for the first problem without resorting to the use of a product like WRISE, but the second problem seems to have a solution in the form of a simple preferment using only commercial yeast. In this vein, Tom Lehmann himself has recommended use of a short-term (3-4 hours) room-temperature fermented sponge (technically more like a biga, in my view) that is incorporated into the final dough before pre-forming the dough into a skin and cold fermenting it for next day use (usually).

Armed with what I have learned to date about take-and-bake pizzas, I came up with the following formulation for a 16-inch Lehmann NY style take-and-bake dough--which includes in the quantities specified what I will refer to as the “biga”:

Take-and-Bake Formulation for 16-Inch Lehmann NY Style Dough
100%, Flour (King Arthur Sir Lancelot high-gluten flour), 13.02 oz. (368.83 g.)
63%, Water, 8.20 oz. (232.36 g.)
3%, Oil, 0.39 oz. (11.06 g.), 2 3/8 t. (Note: I used 80% canola, or around 2 t., and 20% olive oil, or around 1/2 t.)
1.75%, Salt, 0.23 oz. (6.45 g.), a bit over 1 1/8 t.
0.25%, Instant dry yeast (IDY), 0.03 oz. (0.92 g.), a bit less than 1/3 t.
2%, Sugar, 0.26 oz. (7.38 g.), about 1 7/8 t.
Total dough weight (for one 16-inch pizza) = 22.12 oz. (627.01 g.)
Thickness Factor (TF) = 0.11

Before discussing the biga, I will mention as additional background information that take-and-bake dough skins tend to use low yeast levels (to achieve slow fermentation and to prevent gassiness in the dough), and higher than normal sugar levels (mainly for crust color purposes) and oil levels (mainly for softness and tenderness in the crust). In my case, I used elevated sugar and oil levels and I also increased the thickness of the dough, from the usual 0.10-0.105 thickness factor, to 0.11, in an attempt to reduce the level of crispiness in the crust by using a slightly thicker dough.

To make the biga, I took 55% of the flour and 55% of the water (by weight) called for in the above formulation, added all of the yeast, and mixed and kneaded them together into a dough that had a texture and consistency similar to the final dough. I used my KitchenAid stand mixer, but any mixing technique can be used. In my case, I used water at around 120 degrees F to achieve a relatively warm dough, at around 85 degrees F, to allow for good fermentation in my kitchen at a temperature of around 64 degrees F. I allowed the dough to remain, covered, at room temperature for around 4-5 hours. The formulation for the biga itself can be characterized as follows:

Biga Formulation
Flour, 7.16 oz. (203.01 g.), 1 1/2 c. plus 3 T. plus 1 t.
Water (at 120 degree F), 4.51 oz. (127.86 g.), a bit less than 5/8 c.
Yeast (IDY), 0.03 oz. (0.92 g.), a bit less than 1/3 t.

After the 4-5 hour fermentation, I incorporated the biga with the rest of the dough ingredients. The salt was first dissolved in the remaining water (cool out of the refrigerator), along with the sugar, and the biga was added along with the remaining flour (gradually). The oil was added after all of the other ingredients had formed a rough ball, using the stir and 1 speeds. The dough was then kneaded in the usual fashion for about 5-6 minutes at #2 speed. For convenience, the remaining quantities of flour and water that were combined with the biga can be recited as follows:

Remaining Flour and Water Quantities
Flour, 5.86 oz. (165.82 g.), 1 1/3 c. plus 1 T. plus 1 t.
Water (cool out of the refrigerator), 3.69 oz. (104.50 g.), between 3/8 and 1/2 c.

Once the dough was finished, it was allowed to rest, covered, for 30 minutes at room temperature. It was then shaped and stretched into a 16-inch skin. The dough had a fair amount of elasticity, but after allowing it to rest for a minute or two a few times, the dough did reach the desired 16-inch diameter. The skin was prepared for refrigeration in the manner previously described in the abovereferenced posts, using the cardboard/parchment paper/plastic wrap arrangement previously shown and described.

The pre-formed skin was kept under refrigeration for about 24 hours. It was then dressed in a simple pepperoni style and, to simulate travel from a take-and-bake operation to a consumer’s home, I allowed the fully dressed pizza to sit at room temperature, covered, for about an hour. I might mention that I used a fairly thick sauce--as is typically recommended--to prevent water in the sauce from migrating into the dough during the one-hour wait. As added insurance, I had also pre-coated the undressed skin with a bit of olive oil before putting the sauce down. The pizza was baked on the center oven rack position, on the parchment paper, at a preheated 425 degrees F, for about a total of 15 minutes.

I would describe the latest take-and-bake pizza as the best of the take-and-bake pizzas I have made to date. The crust was chewy and had exceptionally good flavor--almost like a baguette bread flavor--and decent coloration. I was especially surprised by the crust flavor, especially since the dough had remained in the refrigerator for only 24 hours. The crust was still crispier than what I have been looking for--with only modest airiness in the rim--despite the relatively high 63% hydration level. I believe that this result might be attributed to reduced oven spring at 425 degrees F on an oven rack without a preheated stone/tiles. I suspect this is why a product like WRISE is often used.

I believe I can improve the take-and-bake product further, and I have several ideas that I plan to incorporate into my next attempt. To the extent that they advance the process, I will report the results.

Peter

Offline abc

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #363 on: February 20, 2006, 12:45:25 PM »
This is the Lehmann 16" using KingArthur's HIGluten flour.  I haven't used it in a few yrs, and this is the first time I tried the Lehmann with the KA HiG flour.  I'm very impressed with it.  Compared to my previous flour, which is a local 'Jewish' HiG flour (which was good), the KA HiG has more flour flavor, and has more of a crackle like malt for a bagel.  I would say that the simple 'window pane' test that I did out of curiosity was more impressive too.  I bought a 50lb bag with 15.00 shipping from DutchValley foods as mentioned in another thread.  Comes out to about 3.00 per 5lb bag for me, I believe.

Some quick pics, 24 hr rise, 1 final room temp rest.  Fresh tomatoes pulsed and seasoned 2hrs ahead of use, periodically pour out settled water.  Fresh basil, some low moisture whole milk Pollyo, then some local 'fresh' mozz $5/1lb ball, sliced peperroni, some onions.

« Last Edit: February 20, 2006, 12:47:29 PM by abc »

Offline abc

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #364 on: February 26, 2006, 11:02:11 AM »
After about 6 months I got the urge to try a 18", being that I'm working with KA HI.G flour after a few yrs w/ it and having more experience with the Lehmann dough.

I gave it a 2day+ fridge rise.

Pies were finished with NINA tomatoes just pulsed and seasoned, then Polly-o low moisture whole milk from loaf.  Pepperoni and onion.  Simple stuff, just wanted to see how my oven would handle it because 6 months earlier i had some problems with heating.  This time I heated the stone in a middle rack for 1hr, then moved it down to the oven floor.  I think this made a difference.  I think the longer rise gave better char too.


Offline foodblogger

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #365 on: February 26, 2006, 11:41:45 AM »
Wow that looks delicious.  I really like how the tips of the onions blackened.  I bet that tasted amazing.  Smoky parts, sweet parts, juicy parts, all contrasting.  I also like the browning you got on the crust.  Was the 18 inch size more difficult to handle as in getting it in and out of the oven etc?  After I get beyond a certain size it gets iffy.  I need a bigger pizza stone I guess.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #366 on: February 26, 2006, 12:57:19 PM »
foodblogger,

It would be nice to have a really large stone, but you can use an 18-inch pizza screen along with a smaller stone. This is what I do since I don't have an 18+ inch stone and I can't tile my oven shelf to get that size without having to have some of the tiles cut to fit. What I do is bake the pizza on the screen on an upper shelf of the oven and when the pizza crust sets and the pizza is firm and the crust starts to turn brown (after about 5-6 minutes), I shift the pizza off of the screen onto my 1-hour preheated stone at the lowest oven rack position to finish baking and to get better bottom crust browning. At this point it doesn't matter that the pizza is bigger than the stone and overlaps it. Another nice thing about using the screen is that you don't have to worry about navigating the 18-inch pizza from a peel onto the stone or tiles.

Peter


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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #367 on: February 26, 2006, 02:44:33 PM »
Pete-
That is an excellent tip and I have already set the wheels in motion for me to be able to try it out.  I ordered an 18 inch like 3 weeks ago and it hasn't come in yet.  Grumble Grumble Grumble. 

Offline abc

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #368 on: February 26, 2006, 05:24:18 PM »
2 mor pics of 1 left over slice.

Offline abc

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #369 on: February 26, 2006, 05:35:29 PM »
Wow that looks delicious.  I really like how the tips of the onions blackened.  I bet that tasted amazing.  Smoky parts, sweet parts, juicy parts, all contrasting.  I also like the browning you got on the crust.  Was the 18 inch size more difficult to handle as in getting it in and out of the oven etc?  After I get beyond a certain size it gets iffy.  I need a bigger pizza stone I guess.

thanks.  i too like the charred onion tips.  i've been fortunate to have been able to achieve that for a while when i add onions as a topping.

yes the charring on the crust i wasn't previously able to achieve with the 18" inch, only the 16"... my next test is a few more times with a 2+ day rise with KA flour to see if this is better than a 1 day rise.  I'm really liking the use of KA flour again.  The flour of the crust, with a few occasional bites being subtly bitter due to the rustic charring is exactly how it is in the decent local 5 borough NYC pizza places (I find that at least 2/5 places don't have an intense enough flame and when you buy a whole pie, it's not charred, but the same pie is fine when you order 1 or 2 slices from their counter and they reheat it).

it was sickeningly tasty today as a cold pizza.  naturally sweet savory red onions, fresh bright sauce (still looking to make it more zesty) just a tad of pepperoni, fresh cheese, hint of oregano, basil, garlic... flavorful crust tast.

Yes, 18" was more difficult.  I'm finding the KA flour to be very extensible... I may have to try reducing the water by 2 or 3 pct... i couldn't stretch it much without bracing it on the counter.

I also parbake these days, and with this 18" I had to open my oven a few times  and being that I waited the for the oven to get back to 550degrees, it slowed the process down measurably.   I should say I tried.  avg. temps were probably 510degrees.  When I make the 16" pies I think I avg. 540%.

I use a 16" round stone... I used the 18" screen to parbake, then a few min w/o the screen, then the final min. with a screen again.  I generally like dough to stone direct contact as much as possible.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #370 on: February 26, 2006, 06:05:28 PM »
abc,

I assume when you say "parbake" you mean that you bake the skin on the pizza screen for a specified period, then dress it, and finish baking the pizza. Is that correct? Also, at which oven rack position do you start the prebake and how do you thereafter move the pizza around?

As far as extensibility is concerned, lowering the hydration is a good way to go without giving up too much in the way of an open crumb. You might also use cooler water. When I first started making the Lehmann doughs, I temperature adjusted the water to get a finished dough temperature of around 80-85 degrees F, which is what Tom Lehmann specified in his dough formulation. It took me a long time to figure out that my refrigerator operated warmer than a commercial cooler and that my doughs were undergoing a faster fermentation than if I were using a commercial cooler. Now I use cooler water and shoot for a finished dough temperature of around 75 degrees F to get the fermentation process back in line. Another way to do it would be to use the 80-85 degrees target but use less yeast.

Peter

Offline scott r

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #371 on: February 27, 2006, 02:03:42 AM »
Peter,  I had to do a pizza party at a relatives place this weekend with a 550 degree oven.  I have a bag of General Mills Full Strength flour that I haven't used in a while, so I decided to try a lehmann recipe with it.  I used your standard 63% hydration recipe, and yes....... IDY.  I recently found a one pound bag of Fleischman's IDY for two bucks at a restaraunt supply store so I picked it up.  I just wanted to let you know that the pies turned out excellent without any need for modification to the recipe because of the change in the type of flour.  I received a  comment that the pizza was just like what a friend had on a recent trip to NYC.

Thanks for the awesome recipe!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #372 on: February 27, 2006, 10:59:44 AM »
Thank you, scott, but the credit should really go to Tom Lehmann. It is his formulation and all I did was to act as a translator to convert it to home use. It was even his writings that taught me how to do that, plus a whole lot more.
Our members may not know that Tom is a member of our forum, albeit a dormant one. As noted at the following PMQ Think Tank thread, forum member pftaylor tried to engage Tom further in the activities at our forum by posting at the Think Tank: http://www.pmq.com/cgi-bin/tt/index.cgi/noframes/read/26981. After all of the things I have done to the basic Lehmann dough formulation, I was fearful that I would have to enter a witness protection program if Tom actually saw what I did to his dough formulation.

BTW, for those not familiar with the General Mills Full Strength flour that scott used, it is basically a bread flour with around 12.6% protein. I don't believe it is a flour available at retail, and I would guess that it comes in a 50-lb. bag.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #373 on: March 20, 2006, 06:55:59 AM »
A while back, at Reply 297 at page 15 of this thread (at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.280.html), I described an experiment in which I made and baked a 9” Lehmann NY style pizza on a preheated bed of rocks. Pleased with the results, I wondered whether it would be feasible to make a much larger pizza using the same approach. Recently I bought an inexpensive Wilton 15 3/4” perforated pizza pan and decided to test the notion of a much larger pizza, in this case a 15” pizza. I used the standard Lehmann NY style dough formulation, as adapted to the 15” size and a thickness factor (TF) of 0.105. The final formulation I used was as follows:

100%, High-gluten flour (KASL), 11.19 oz. (316.89 g.), 2 1/2 c. plus 1 T. plus 2 t.
63%, Water, 7.04 oz. (199.64 g.), 7/8 c.
1.75%, Salt, 0.20 oz. (5.55 g.), 1 t.
0.25%, Instant dry yeast (IDY), 0.03 oz. (0.79 g.), a bit more than 1/4 t.
1%, Oil, 0.11 oz. (3.17 g.), a bit more than 5/8 t.
Total dough weight = 18.56 oz. (526.03 g.)
Thickness factor (TF) = 0.105
Note: All measurements are U.S./metric standard

To make the dough, I used my KitchenAid stand mixer and the following sequencing of ingredients: Water, salt (dissolved in the water), flour/IDY mixture (added gradually at "stir" speed), and oil. The oil was added when the other ingredients formed a rough dough ball, and the dough was kneaded for about 5 minutes more at 2 speed. Once made, the dough was put in the refrigerator in a metal container for a total of almost 3 days, following which the dough was removed from the refrigerator and allowed to warm up (covered with a sheet of plastic wrap) for about 2 hours at room temperature. The dough was then shaped and stretched into a 15” skin (on a lightly floured wood peel). The dough was very extensible but still manageable despite the roughly 3 days of fermentation.

The pizza was dressed with a simple tomato sauce (Stanislaus Tomato Magic), shredded Grande whole-milk mozzarella cheese, Margherita pepperoni slices, and dried oregano. The dressed pizza was deposited onto the bed of rocks in the 15 3/4” perforated pizza pan which had been preheated for about an hour at around 500-550 degrees F. The pizza was allowed to bake on the bed of rocks for about 5-6 minutes, whereupon the pizza was transferred off of the bed of rocks to an upper oven rack position where the pizza was subjected to direct top heat from the broiler element, which had been turned on about 5 minutes into the bake cycle. The pizza remained under the broiler for about a minute or two, so as to provide better top crust browning.

The photos below show the rock/pan arrangement and the finished product. I thought the pizza turned out very well. The crust was chewy and soft, with decent oven spring and a bit of crispiness at the rim. The crust away from the rim was softer and less crispy than usual, but the pizza was very tasty and enjoyable nonetheless. As might be expected after 3 days of fermentation, the finished crust had good flavor and texture. It was a nice departure from the usual Lehmann pizzas baked on a pizza stone. I also confirmed that it is possible to make a decent sized pizza on a bed of rocks. So, if someone had a perforated (or even a non-perforated) pizza pan and can round up enough clean (washed and dried) rocks to cover the entire bottom of the pan, it is possible to make a decent pizza without the need for a pizza stone or tiles. I’m not a camper, but I wonder whether the approach might be adapted to a campfire setting. According to Evelyne Slomon, the precursors to pizzas were baked on stones in Neolithic times (http://www.pmq.com/cgi-bin/tt/index.cgi/noframes/read/27750) :chef:.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 20, 2006, 07:00:10 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #374 on: March 20, 2006, 07:13:34 AM »
And the pie..



 

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