Author Topic: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza  (Read 541956 times)

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Offline WarEagle09

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Re:Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1050 on: October 19, 2013, 10:59:34 AM »
While visiting friends recently in Massachusetts, I offered to make a couple of NY style pizzas.  Since the Tom L. recipe for NY style dough has become etched in my brain and is now firmly a part of my DNA, I decided to use that recipe.  Along with the memorized recipe, I had brought my 16-inch pizza screen (in order to be able to make 16-inch pizzas), and my calculator.  My friends have a Braun variable speed food processor, a peel, and a pizza stone, but not much more.  Since I had brought no flours with me, and since my friends had neither high-gluten flour or bread flour, I decided to experiment with vital wheat gluten (VWG).  I was fortunate enough to find both King Arthur bread flour and the Arrowhead brand of VWG in a local Wild Oats market.  Doing a little bit of math, I was able to determine how much VWG to add to the KA bread flour to equal the protein content of the KA Sir Lancelot high-gluten flour (more on this below).  With a little bit of luck, the dough and the pizzas turned out fine, and before I could take photos, the pizzas were history.  I thought enough of the results, however, to repeat the experiment when I returned home to Texas--and, this time, to take a few photos.  I think the value of the experiment is to demonstrate that a good NY style pizza based on Tom L.'s NY style dough recipe can be made when a high-gluten flour is not available.  If either bread flour or all-purpose flour is available, along with VWG, the protein content of the basic flour used can be increased using the VWG.

For the most recent experiment, I decided on a 16-inch, thin pizza, using a hydration level of 63% and 0.25% IDY for the dough (and a thickness factor of 0.10).   Using the basic formula (stated elsewhere in this thread) to calculate the needed dough ball weight, I calculated that I would need a dough ball weight of around 20 ounces.  Using the baker's percents for Tom L.'s recipe, I calculated that the amount of KA bread flour I would need would be 12.10 ounces (the remaining ingredients and quantities are listed below).

To increase the protein content of the KA bread flour to approximate the protein level of the KA Sir Lancelot flour, I undertook the following steps.  First, I determined the difference in protein content between the KA Sir Lancelot high-gluten flour and the KA bread flour.  KA says that the protein content of its KASL flour is 14.2%, and 12.7% for its bread flour.  This gives us a difference of 1.5%, which has to be made up by the use of VWG. Tom L. and others tell us that for each 1% of VWG (by weight of flour) that is added to another flour, the protein content of that other flour will be increased by 0.6%.  So, for a differential of 1.5% in our specific case, this means that the amount of VWG to add to the KA bread flour (by weight of flour) should be 2.5% (1.5/0.6 = 2.5).   Taking 2.5% of 12.10 ounces of KA bread flour gives us about 0.30 ounces of VWG to add.  Arrowhead says that 1 T. of its VWG weighs 9 grams.  Doing some simple gram-to-ounces conversions tells us that 0.30 ounces of VWG (about 8.5 grams) comes to about 1 T.   We're almost home, but not quite yet.  Because the addition of the VWG increases the weight of the flour to which it is added, Tom L. tells us that we should increase the amount of water called for in the recipe by an amount equal to 1 1/2 times the VWG.  In this case, that added water came to 0.45 oz., or about 1 T.  To avoid pilling/lumping, the VWG is added directly to the flour and stirred into it.

The final recipe, with baker's percents, is as follows:

   KA bread flour (100%), 12.10 ounces (about 2 3/4 c.)
   Arrowhead VWG (2.5 %), 0.30 oz. (about 1 T.)
   Water (63%), 7.65 oz. (about 7/8 c.), plus an additional 1 T.
   Salt (1.75%), 0.21 oz. (about 1 t.)
   Oil (1.0%), 0.12 oz. (about 3/4 t.)
   IDY (0.25%), 0.03 oz. (between 1/4 and 1/3 t.)

To make the dough, I used my basic Cuisinart food processor with the plastic blade attached.  The water temperature was adjusted to achieve a finished dough temperature of around 80 degrees F.  For this experiment, this meant a water temperature (calculated) of 42 degrees F.  The processing of the dough was as previously described in this thread for a food processor, so I will not describe it here in detail.  The finished dough temperature was 83 degrees F and the dough ball weight was 20.55 ounces.  As will be noted, the added VWG and water increased the dough ball weight by a fraction of an ounce.  As an alternative approach, I could have reduced the amount of KA bread flour by an amount equal to the VWG added (their weights are about equal), and dispensed with the added tablespoon of water, and this would have produced a dough ball slightly closer to the calculated weight.  This is an approach that has been advocated by Giotto elsewhere at this site.  However, I chose instead to follow the recommendations of Tom. L. with respect to VWG for his recipe. 

The finished dough was refrigerated for about 24 hours, and brought out to room temperature for about 1/2 hour before shaping. The dough was an extremely good dough--easy to toss, stretch and form.  It had good extensibility, elasticity and smoothness.  After the dough was shaped, it was dressed in a simple pepperoni style and baked for about 7 minutes on the 16-inch pizza screen at a temperature of around 475 degrees F and finished for a final 2 minutes on a pizza stone that had been preheated for about an hour at 475 degrees F.  The finished pizza had the typical characteristics of a NY style pizza.  However, I can't say that it was identical to one made using the KASL high-gluten flour.  As between the two, I prefer a pizza dough made using the KASL flour.  This is not to diminish the pizza made with the KA bread flour supplemented by the VWG. The dough was exceptional--one of the best I have made--and it produced a good pizza.  And, since high-gluten flour is virtually unavailable at the retail level, one can still make a decent pizza if bread flour (or even all-purpose flour) and VWG are available.  (VWG is available in most large supermarkets and specialty food stores; the Arrowhead brand typically sells for about $3 for a 10 ounce package and is often sold in the bulk bins at places like Whole Foods and Wild Oats).

A photo of the finished pizza is shown below.  Note the presence of the bubbling.  I had intentionally shaped the dough earlier than usual to see if I would experience that effect.  I happen to like bubbles, but for those who don't I recommend that the dough be allowed to sit at room temperature for 1-2 hours before shaping.  A slice photo follows this posting.

Peter

 
Hi,

I'd like to make a dough based on this process, but, as is the case with many non-commercial process, I need to adjust it based on what I have available.

I have Hodgson Mill VWG, which, based on their nutrition facts, has a slightly higher amount of protein/gram than the Arrowhead used here, though I know that companies frequently tend to round their nutrition facts. So it may be the same protein content. I think it is best to start out using the same measurements, and adjust based on the results. Is this a good approach here? (BTW, I do not have a scale).

Also, I have a standard KitchenAid Mixer. Pete used a water temp of 42F when using a food processor. Do I need to go up or down on the water temp to get the 80-85F dough ball temp?

Finally - is a food processor or a mixer better for making the dough? Could somone explain to me the pros/cons of each?

Any other advice is appreciated. Thanks in advance for the help!


Online Pete-zza

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Re:Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1051 on: October 21, 2013, 10:42:06 AM »
I have Hodgson Mill VWG, which, based on their nutrition facts, has a slightly higher amount of protein/gram than the Arrowhead used here, though I know that companies frequently tend to round their nutrition facts. So it may be the same protein content. I think it is best to start out using the same measurements, and adjust based on the results. Is this a good approach here? (BTW, I do not have a scale).

Also, I have a standard KitchenAid Mixer. Pete used a water temp of 42F when using a food processor. Do I need to go up or down on the water temp to get the 80-85F dough ball temp?

Finally - is a food processor or a mixer better for making the dough? Could someone explain to me the pros/cons of each?
WarEagle09,

The best way to determine how much vital wheat gluten (VWG) to use, whatever the brand, is to use the Mixed Mass Percentage Calculator at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/. For example, if you have KABF and the Hodgson Mill VWG and you would like to raise the protein content of the KABF from 12.7% to 14.2%, and the amount of the KABF you have is 12.04 ounces (about 2 3/4 cups), the Mixed Mass Percentage Calculator says that you should use 0.3351 ounces of the Hodgson Mill VWG. Since you don't have a scale, you would have to use the conversion factor for converting a weight of the Hodgson Mill VWG to a volume measurement. In this case, the conversion factor is 0.1058201. This yields 0.3351/0.1058201 = 3.17 teaspoons of the Hodgson Mill VWG, or about 3 1/8 teaspoons. Before adding this amount of VWG to the flour, you should first remove 3 1/8 teaspoons of the KABF. That way, the weight of the KABF and VWG combined will remain about the same as the original flour weight (12.04 ounces in our example).

If you do not have a food processor, and plan to use your stand mixer, you will want to increase the water temperature. That is because the heat from friction is considerably higher with the food processor than the stand mixer because of the food processor's higher speed. The water temperature in your case will be a function of the friction factor for your stand mixer, the room temperature and the flour temperature, and the type of dough and the dough batch size. There are ways of calculating the water temperature that will yield a finished dough temperature of around 80 degrees F, but it is usually easier to just experiment with water temperatures to find what temperature works best in your case. For example, in the summer, you might use around 65 degrees F and increase it in the winter to something closer to 90 degrees F. Each case and each environment is different so some experimentation is required. And you don't have to be precise. Being off a few degrees on one side or the other of the desired finished dough temperature will not be the end of the world. For an interesting take on this subject, you might read the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14376.msg143632.html#msg143632.

As for the use of a food processor versus a stand mixer, you might want to read Reply 1 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2189.msg19291/topicseen.html#msg19291 and the article at http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2011/02/pizza-protips-kneading-converting-recipes-for-food-processor.html. You might also take a look at the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12877.msg125013.html#msg125013.

Peter

Offline flyhigh123

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1052 on: October 21, 2013, 06:01:00 PM »
finally made it again using the breadmachine recipe. the dough looked amazing this time.

Do you oil the plastic container before the 24 hour wait? Mine stuck to the bottom of the container.

Also, my edges didn't brown and looked pale. When you are shaping the dough, do you use bread flour or should i use something different? The taste was pretty good.

1st pizza at 550, it cooked quick but the bottom didn't brown and get crispy enough.

2nd pizza at 510, it cooked perfect this time, just not browned crust.

Offline cooper

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1053 on: November 01, 2013, 09:26:42 AM »
I've tried some different pizza dough formulations and baking techniques, though very few compared to many posters here.  For something I know works right for me every time, which may be helpful to newbies, here is my basic Lehmann recipe for 2 pizzas of approximately 13" diameter.  I don't have a mixer.  I have a pizza stone, a wooden peel and a pizza screen (the screen is helpful, but not required).  Oh, and perhaps the most useful gadget of all: a food scale.

Cold "yeast" pizza dough fermentations strike me as essentially the same thing as "no knead" bread, with which I've had great success, though I use a sourdough starter for that.  It isn't necessary to work the dough very much by hand.  Time does the job.

My usual NY pizza dough (makes two 12.5 to 13ish" pizzas):

480g King Arthur bread flour
300g water (bottled usually)
3/8 t IDY
1 1/2 t salt
1 t oil

Plus a little bench flour while kneading. 

I weigh out 480g flour in one bowl.  300g water in another.  I add the yeast to the water and stir.  Add salt to the flour.  Pour about half the flour into the water and stir with a fork.  Cover and let rest for 10-20 minutes.  Then add the oil and mix well using a fork.  Work in the remaining flour.  When it comes together briefly knead.  Gluten development isn't important here, as that will happen in the fridge; just thoroughly mix.  If the flour stiffens too much while kneading, cover and let it rest a little while and then continue kneading.  Divide into 2 portions, place in lightly oiled plastic bowls.  Cover and refrigerate for 2-3 days.

Set bowls out on counter roughly 2 hours before bake time.

I use just shy of 8 ounces of cheese per pizza.  So far, I prefer a combination of mozzarella and provalone.  I still haven't measured how much sauce I use, though I should. 

I bake in my old gas oven on a stone preheated at 550ish for an hour on the bottom rack for about 4:45, then move up to a screen on the top rack for another couple minutes to finish the top.  I almost always have mushrooms and other moist toppings that benefit from the extended cooking/drying time.  I intend to experiment with partially drying mushrooms in a dehydrator.  Pre-cooking doesn't provide what I like.

When the first pizza is done I set it (along with the screen) on top of the stove burners to vent/rest while I make the next pizza.  I move the pizza to a pan or baking sheet lined with paper towels when I need to use the screen for the next pizza.

I have only limited experience baking in other ovens, and as most know, ovens are a big YMMV factor.  Quite some time ago when my oven was on the blink I used a newer oven across the street.  That was fun.  Make up a pizza and run it over to the oven.  Same stone.  However, this newer oven topped out at only 500 on the dial.  Pizzas weren't nearly as good as baked at 550 in mine.  Just not quite enough heat.

Offline GarlicLover

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1054 on: November 01, 2013, 05:57:43 PM »
I'd love to try Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza recipe. Can someone convert/reduce the amount of ingredients so that the dough makes about three 14-inch pizzas?

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1055 on: November 01, 2013, 07:53:52 PM »
I'd love to try Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza recipe. Can someone convert/reduce the amount of ingredients so that the dough makes about three 14-inch pizzas?
GarlicLover,

I know you are in Germany but can you tell us what kinds of flours you have available to you to attempt the Lehmann NY style dough recipe? For your information, a NY style dough in general benefits from a flour with a protein content of from about 12.7% to around 14.2%, and preferably bromated. However, I can understand that you will not be able to locate a source of bromated flour in Germany.

I also understand that you do not currently have a pizza stone but are using a perforated disk or a cutter pan. Do you intend to buy a pizza stone? I further understand that you do not currently have a scale. Do you intend to buy one or are you also asking for a version specified by volume measurements.

Also, are you after a thin crust version of the NY style, and what fermentation period are you after?

It might be possible to come up with a dough formulation for you to try but we won't know for sure until you can provide information to guide us.

Peter

Offline GarlicLover

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1056 on: November 01, 2013, 09:01:48 PM »
I know you are in Germany but can you tell us what kinds of flours you have available to you to attempt the Lehmann NY style dough recipe?

I'll have to look first. I'll do that in the next few days.

Quote
I also understand that you do not currently have a pizza stone but are using a perforated disk or a cutter pan. Do you intend to buy a pizza stone?

I'm looking to order a pizza stone from Amazon.de: http://www.amazon.de/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1/280-7259041-7685045?__mk_de_DE=%C3%85M%C3%85%C5%BD%C3%95%C3%91&url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=pizzastein&sprefix=pizza%2Caps&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Apizzastein ... but first I need to know what to look for/what to avoid.

Currently discussing that in this thread: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,28333.msg285871.html

If you could also shed some light on that subject, that'd be great. :)

Quote
I further understand that you do not currently have a scale. Do you intend to buy one or are you also asking for a version specified by volume measurements.

I will buy a scale ASAP, so I'd appreciate a regular "by-weight" recipe for three 13-inch pizzas.

Quote
Also, are you after a thin crust version of the NY style, and what fermentation period are you after?

Well, I'd love something that's ready to be used after 15 - 20 hours of cold fermentation. As far as crust, didn't really think much about it. I'd say not thin and not huge, kinda medium I guess?

Offline Morgan

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1057 on: November 22, 2013, 09:58:40 AM »
Just made a batch of this Lehmann ny style: http://feelingfoodish.com/the-best-new-york-style-pizza-dough/

I guess its the same dough, but with weight measures which is easier to me.

« Last Edit: November 22, 2013, 10:01:10 AM by Morgan »

Offline ilikepizzaandbbq

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1058 on: December 02, 2013, 09:09:11 PM »
I'm new to the forum, but I've been reading it for a while. I only recently bought a scale, which helped my pizzamaking a lot, but my attempts at homemade starters never really panned out. Below are a couple of my first lehmann dough attempts. The first one was a same-day dough (man's gotta eat) of around 59% hydration using IDY only. Second was a similar hydration, but I let that one cold-ferment for 3 days. Predictably, the second one was much tastier. I think it sat in the refrigerator a little too long though because when I was laying out the dough a massive bubble formed in it that I had to pop. I sifted the flour twice and used rest periods when mixing. Both of them were around 5 minute bakes at just over 500 degrees. Left the stone on the bottom rack. I need to work on drying the cheese when using fresh mozzarella. Still, slowly making progress thanks to all the info on this site.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2013, 09:18:37 PM by ilikepizzaandbbq »


Offline Simple Man

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1059 on: December 12, 2013, 09:35:32 AM »
Here is my 1st attempt at the Lehmann's NY Style Pizza.

I used ingredients per Peter's reply # 68 on this thread with the exception of the VWG.

I hand kneaded the dough, oiled lightly and refrigerated for 24Hrs. I then removed and let the dough come to room temp (65F) for 2 hours. I hand tossed the dough to approximately fit a 16" perforated pizza pan. Dough seemed exceptionally easy to work with and I was able to get almost paper thin. Covered with sauce, shredded whole milk mozz. (Sargento), pepperoni (Hormel)and fresh basil. I thought I had this one nailed but dough ended up quite hard and didn't have the air pockets I was expecting. It also shrunk in diameter about and inch during the baking process. Baked on middle rack of preheated oven at 475F for 10 mins, then turned on broiler at 500F for 5 mins.

The mistakes I know I made were;
1) Using volume as opposed to weight measurements
2) Baking on pizza pan vs. stone

Once I find my pizza stone I will attempt again using weight measurements and maybe longer cold ferment times.
Dave

Offline JulianN

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1060 on: December 26, 2013, 11:48:10 PM »
I have a question for people who use or have used Pillsbury bread flour for the Tom Le Mann recipe. What is a good Hydration percentage for a pretty small batch of dough? It is my first time using this brand of flour, and I have no idea how well it absorbs water.

Thanks for any and all help,
Julian

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1061 on: December 26, 2013, 11:56:58 PM »
Julian,

I would say around 61-62%.

Peter

Offline JulianN

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1062 on: December 27, 2013, 12:30:11 AM »
Thanks, Pete. I will give that percentage a try and tell everyone how it works out.

Julian

Offline JulianN

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1063 on: December 28, 2013, 11:50:23 AM »
I tried it at 61% and found it to be far to wet. I began adding flour to the mixture and put somewhere around a half a cup more flour in. The beginning flour amount was about 7 1/2 Oz. I also tried using the food processor for the first time with no luck. It just got tangled between the blade and bowl. Am I doing something wrong or do I just have a bad blender from many years ago?

Julian

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1064 on: December 28, 2013, 12:56:29 PM »
Julian,

This is the thread that I usually cite for those who choose to use a food processor to make a NY style dough:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2189.msg19289.html#msg19289

Peter

Offline JulianN

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1065 on: December 29, 2013, 12:48:15 AM »
Thanks, Pete. I have read through that and others, but I still managed to mess it up. I am more of a visual learner; do you know of any good videos demonstrating this technique? I think that the main reason it didn't work, is that my dough was to wet. I have only recently begun taking my pizza dough seriously, and I am still working on finding a good mixture for me.

I have a quick question: on the dough calculator it says that EVO isn't recommended; why? This is the only olive oil I have right now so I haven't been putting any oil in my dough.

Thanks,
Julian

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1066 on: December 29, 2013, 09:38:11 AM »
Julian,

Most domestic bread flours can usually handle around 62% hydration, so I am surprised that you needed to add as much extra flour as you did, even when using a food processor (I assume you weighed the flour and water). Most millers don't cite the rated absorption values for their flours, but for the King Arthur bread flour, where we do know the value, it is 62%. Many professionals typically operate within a range of absorption values and, for a bread flour, it might be 57-64%. So you might have to play around with the Pillsbury bread flour quantity to get the sough consistency and cohesiveness you desire.

As for the recommendation that extra virgin olive oil not be used for a dough to be made using the Lehmann dough calculating tool, you can find the explanation at Reply 5 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,19477.msg190635/topicseen.html#msg190635.

As for a video that shows how to use a food processor to make pizza dough, I am not aware of having seen one although I did not specifically look for one especially when the techniques I developed seemed to work well for me.

Peter


Offline JulianN

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1067 on: December 29, 2013, 12:06:36 PM »
Thanks, Pete. I don't have a scale right now, but I would really like to get one. How long do you have to run your processor before your dough forms a ball around the blade? It never formed a ball for me; it just made my blades unable to spin. Thanks for the link, I will use olive oil next time I make dough. As for the video, I, too, have looked to no avail.

Thanks,
Julian

P.S. Are there any scales in the price range of around $15 that you recommend?

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1068 on: December 30, 2013, 11:02:34 AM »
Julian,

If you are not using a scale, I don't know how you have been measuring out flour and water so that the correct hydration value is achieved. If you are using the hydration value based on volume measurements, that will give you incorrect results. The hydration value is a weight-based value. So, for example, if you have 100 grams of flour and you want a hydration value of 62%, you would use 62 grams of water. In some early recipes in this thread, there were attempts to convert weight measurements to volume measurements but they turned out not to be entirely reliable in a general home setting.

With respect to your question about how long it takes for a ball to form in a food processor, that will depend on the recipe, the amount of dough to be made, and especially the hydration value and whether any other liquids are also used, such as oil. But if the dough as it is being mixed remains crumbly and refuses to combine into a cohesive ball, as is quite common for low-hydration cracker style doughs, that is an indication that there is not enough water to allow a dough ball to be formed, no matter how hard the machine tries to do this. On the other hand, if the dough is wet and liquidy, like a thick pancake batter, the blade will continue to whirl away and never be able to form a dough ball because there is just too much water. I suspect that problems like this will go away for the most part if you start using a scale.

I have not researched digital scales recently, but $15 is perhaps somewhat on the low side for a quality digital scale. At a minimum, you want to look for a scale that can measure to 1 gram/0.1 ounce resolution. It should also be able to handle several pounds of weight. Unless another member reads this post and can offer up a recommendation based on recent experience, you might look for threads on scales on the board at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?board=48.0.

Peter

Offline JulianN

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1069 on: December 30, 2013, 11:28:20 PM »
I guess I need a scale. I have seen that the AWS low weight scales have been recommended. The AWS 1000 - 0.1g is my first choice, but this scale is a lot more appealing because of the fact that there is nothing blocking any of the sides, which means I could put a bigger bowl on this one.

Can you say if either of these would be a good choice for a hobby?

Julian

P.S. 1000g is plenty for me and I don't think I will mind not being able to go past 0.1g.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1070 on: December 30, 2013, 11:40:34 PM »
I guess I need a scale. I have seen that the AWS low weight scales have been recommended. The AWS 1000 - 0.1g is my first choice, but this scale is a lot more appealing because of the fact that there is nothing blocking any of the sides, which means I could put a bigger bowl on this one.

Can you say if either of these would be a good choice for a hobby?

Julian

P.S. 1000g is plenty for me and I don't think I will mind not being able to go past 0.1g.
Julian, do you know how to include "links" within your post to objects you are referencing ?  i.e. https://www.pricemaster.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=2648

ps...I have that scale and it is great for the small stuff. Only weighs to 2lbs. though and you would need to use a very small bowl....platform has maybe 2" by 2" footprint.  ;)
« Last Edit: December 30, 2013, 11:45:45 PM by Chicago Bob »
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Offline JulianN

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« Last Edit: March 04, 2014, 06:43:02 PM by Steve »

Offline JulianN

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1072 on: December 30, 2013, 11:50:55 PM »
If the first scale that I linked to is as good as the second, I would very much prefer to get it it because of the un-ubstructed sides.

Julian

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1073 on: December 31, 2013, 09:35:44 AM »
If the first scale that I linked to is as good as the second, I would very much prefer to get it it because of the un-ubstructed sides.

Julian
Scale #2 lid lays flat so there is no obstruction....both scales will do the same things.
Myself, I'd go with #2 because of the built in lid and because I know it's a good scale(I have one). #1 has moving parts, the swing out dial...I wouldn't trust that.
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Offline JulianN

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Re: Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1074 on: December 31, 2013, 12:36:33 PM »
I didn't know that the lid went all the way down. I guess I will go with the second one.


Thanks,
Julian