Author Topic: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style  (Read 73788 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #40 on: November 08, 2007, 08:33:06 PM »
BTB,

Considering all that you went through, I would say that you did pretty well for a start. However, I can assure you that it can be done much more easily that what you experienced. But it was good to know what you did because it convinces me more than ever that a critical part of the process is the use of a food processor to prepare the dough. There is an entire thread on the forum devoted to using a stand mixer to make the DKM cracker-style dough, but having used a stand mixer before to make cracker-style doughs, even those with much greater hydration, I can tell you that it is not really up to the task, and certainly not my basic KitchenAid mixer with a C-hook. Every DKM dough I have made with my food processor has been just about perfect and very easy to produce. It is important to weigh the flour and water, but the rest of the ingredients can be volume measurements. Next time, if I remember, I will take a photo of the dough mixture as it comes out of my food processor so you can see what the texture of the mixture should ideally look like.

The yeast you used is a variation of IDY. It is the SAF counterpart to the Fleishchman's Rapid-Rise yeast. It should have worked. As for the rise in the dough, I went back to my notes and saw that the dough in my case rose about a third during the two hours in the proofing box. Even then, it was hard to tell because the dough slumped and filled the corners of the storage container, making it difficult to tell how much it actually rose. Hence, I didn't pay too much attention to that.

In addition to the food processor, and pre-baking the dough skin, I think the cutter pan is an important part of the equation to achieve good results and ease of preparation of the pizza in a home environment. If you didn't have a cutter pan at your disposal, it is quite likely that you wouldn't have been able to finish your pizza. Even if the dough skin isn't perfect, if you can get it into the cutter pan, you have a chance of success.

The biggest obstacle in your case is likely to be in getting the proper dough to begin with. Using the electric hand mixer isn't likely to be adequate for that purpose. You might want to drag your mixer out and use that next time. You might even read the thread (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1628.0.html) that deals with the use of a stand mixer to make the DKM dough to see what was recommended there.

Peter


« Last Edit: November 09, 2007, 07:56:22 AM by Pete-zza »


Offline Jackitup

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #41 on: November 09, 2007, 09:05:57 AM »
I agree the food processor would be better. This dough comes out with a density more akin to a pasta dough than a bread/pizza dough and a good food processor would hold up better and do a better job. I have a homemade, scratch pasta dough recipe that I got from a restaurant owner in Mexico that calls for the dough to be mixed to 112 degr. 'BY FRICTION' starting with room temp ingredients, and the only thing that would do it was my old Waring food processor that I recenly laid to rest after 25+ years of faithfull service (very sad day). Now I have to pick out a new one, just haven't got around to getting one yet.
Jon
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #42 on: November 09, 2007, 12:06:58 PM »
BTB,

I did some testing with my electric oven this morning to see if I could get it to a stable temperature of around 110-120 degrees F so that I could use the oven in lieu of the proofing box to warm up the dough. My oven has no temperature readout and I discovered that my oven knob setting starts at 150 degrees F and that my oven thermometers start measuring at around 200 degrees F. When I turned the oven on at a setting below 200 degrees F, the oven heated up too much, especially the racks. I knew this from using my IR thermometer. I found that I could put a pizza stone in the oven and get the temperature of the stone around 125 degrees F, but it would take some tests to determine how to get to that temperature consistently and reliably. So, for now, I will stick with my proofing box because I can set it at its maximum operating temperature of around 115 degrees F and it will stay there for as long as I want.

It occurred to me as I was testing my oven that unless you had a way of knowing the temperature of your oven when you put your dough into it, it is possible that the oven heat was too high and killed the yeast in your dough. Yeast starts to become dormant at around 140 degrees F and dies at around 145 degrees F. At around 153 degrees F, the starch is gelatinized but still swelling.

I might add that you could have still ended up with a pizza even if the yeast died. As we know from the Shakey's experience, it is possible to make a cracker-style pizza without any yeast in the dough. But the dough would still have to be at a temperature to work with.

I have gone back to my post in which I suggested the oven as a possibility in lieu of the proofing box and noted in an edit to see this post.

Peter
« Last Edit: November 09, 2007, 01:04:02 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline fazzari

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #43 on: November 11, 2007, 02:44:05 PM »
Just one more experiment!
I made a batch of 45% dough, let it set at room temp for 12 hours...I then rolled out the dough into a quarter inch sheet, folded the dough into 3 layers and rolled just as thin as I could, may be a bit less than one quarter inch.  Cut out 2 skins and refrigerated over night.  Took out the skins and let them warm up about 1 hour...I then took one skin and rolled it thinner....it was very, very, very easy to do and so this skin ended up being 8.75 inches and weighed 5.75 ounce.  The other skin I left alone..it was a 9.5inch skin which weighed 9.5 ounces.  Cooked both at 475 degrees, right on the pizza stone .  Both pizzas were tender, crispy and delicious..but the one I rolled thinner, even left crumbs the way the Dough Doctor describes from his childhood.  The top pictures should be the one I rolled even thinner.
John

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #44 on: November 11, 2007, 04:34:02 PM »
John,

Thanks for keeping the experiments coming. I don't recall offhand whether I folded and re-rolled the skins when I made the 45-50% hydration Lehmann doughs. I didn't roll out the skins until after one day of room-temperature fermentation, and it was very easy to roll them out. When I get back to my Lehmann cracker-style experiments, I will try the fold and re-roll method.

I have found the 36% hydration doughs to be a greater challenge although I think I am making good progress toward that end.

Over the last couple of days I prepared some doughs using my basic KitchenAid stand mixer. Even though I like the food processor better than my KitchenAid for the low-hydration doughs, I want to see if I can make a decent dough and pizza when using the KitchenAid.

Peter

Offline mr.monte

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #45 on: November 12, 2007, 09:29:15 AM »
Has anybody made the  thin crackery dough and topped it and froze it to bake at a later time ? I'm pretty happy with my recipe, but I noticed when  I topped a few ( I always par-bake a couple minutes ) and froze them for later cooking that when I baked them, the crust was WAY more crispy, in fact almost crunchy.

Offline mr.monte

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #46 on: November 12, 2007, 09:30:33 AM »
Does anybody have a good pizza sauce recipe ? Im glad I got into making my own pizzas as all the "Good" pizza joints around here are going to pre-made crusts and they are horrible.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #47 on: November 12, 2007, 10:15:32 AM »
Has anybody made the  thin crackery dough and topped it and froze it to bake at a later time ?

mr.monte,

Making and freezing the dough with cheese, sauce and toppings is not generally considered to be a good idea because of the damage that is done to the yeast by freezing. However, it is possible to use a chemical leavening system like WRISE in the dough, which is similar to what is used by the frozen pizza manufacturers when they make frozen pizzas like DiGiorno's. The chemical leavenings systems kick in only during baking of the frozen pizza. That way, the dough can still rise even though there is yeast damage. The negative of the chemical leavening systems is that they impart their own unique flavor to the crust (there is baking soda and sodium aluminum phosphate, or SALP, in the WRISE product). To mask the taste of the chemicals, it is usually recommended that high sugar levels be used in the dough--something around 5% by weight of flour.

As you noted, most of the major pizza chains have gone to frozen par-baked dough/skins. They are made at commissaries and delivered to the individual shops where they are kept frozen and later thawed for daily use. Some of the frozen cracker-style crusts also include things like baking soda.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #48 on: November 12, 2007, 10:22:44 AM »
Does anybody have a good pizza sauce recipe ?


mr.monte,

The only sauce recipe that comes to mind for the cracker style pizza is the one at http://www.pizzamaking.com/thincrust.php. However, I can't vouch for the recipe since I haven't tried it. In my experiments with the DKM cracker-style pizza and variations, the only sauce I have been using is the basic 6-in-1 tomatoes right out of the can with a little dried Italian oregano from my garden. That's it. I kept the sauce simple so that it wouldn't take away from the flavors of the rest of the pizzas. Having made several pizzas that way recently, I have gotten quite fond of the sauce.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #49 on: November 12, 2007, 11:01:18 AM »
As I mentioned in Reply 44, I decided to see if I could make a decent cracker-style dough using my KitchenAid stand mixer in lieu of my Cuisinart food processor. In part it was because I thought that other members like BTB without food processors might be interested but I also wondered whether the results using the two different machines would be similar.

As will be described below, as part of my strategy in using the KitchenAid machine I decided to use the same basic methods as previously described in order to get improved hydration of the flour, but also to minimize development of the gluten as much as possible so that the dough would be easier to roll out. I also decided to increase the size of the finished pizza to 15, the size of my cutter pan including the sloping sides. For purposes of the expanded dough calculating tool, I used 16, or one inch greater than the desired final size. As before, I used a thickness factor of 0.07. The formulation I used looked like this:

Flour (100%):
Water (36%):
IDY (1%):
Salt (1.75%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (3.5%):
Sugar (1.2%):
Total (143.45%):
278.15 g  |  9.81 oz | 0.61 lbs
100.13 g  |  3.53 oz | 0.22 lbs
2.78 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.92 tsp | 0.31 tbsp
4.87 g | 0.17 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.87 tsp | 0.29 tbsp
9.74 g | 0.34 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.14 tsp | 0.71 tbsp
3.34 g | 0.12 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.84 tsp | 0.28 tbsp
399.01 g | 14.07 oz | 0.88 lbs | TF = 0.07
Note: Pizza size entered into the tool is 16; desired final pizza size is 15; no bowl residue compensation

To prepare the dough, I started by sifting the flour (Harvest King) to which I added the IDY and stirred to uniformly disperse it in the flour. I then added the formula water, which I had preheated to 135 degrees F, to the mixer bowl. I gradually added the flour mixture to the water by tablespoonsful and stirred the mixture after each flour addition using a standard kitchen fork. I did this until a shaggy wet dough ball formed around the fork. Using this simple method ensured that there would be little or no gluten development at this stage. I estimate that about half of the flour was added to this point. I then covered the bowl and let the dough rest (autolyse) for 15 minutes in order to improve the hydration of the flour. The autolyse period also served to shorten the overall mix time.

At the end of the 15-minute period, I added the salt, sugar, oil and the remaining flour/IDY to the bowl. Using the paddle attachment and operating the mixer at stir speed, I mixed the ingredients for about 6 minutes. I decided not to mix longer than that because I did not want to overly develop the gluten. At the end of the 6 minutes, the dough mix took on the appearance of popcorn, with small-to-medium irregularly shaped pieces. The first photo below shows the dough as I put it on my work surface to form into a ball. As can be seen in the first photo, there was little loose flour. To form the ball, I just pressed everything together. I kneaded the dough ball gently for about a minute. Again, I did not want to overly develop the gluten. The second photo below shows the dough after it was formed. I then flattened the dough ball, oiled it, and placed it into my lightweight plastic snap-fit storage container. The container then went into my proofing box, which I had preheated to its maximum operating temperature of about 115-120 degrees F. The dough remained in the proofing box for an hour and a half. During that time, the dough expanded by about double, as is shown in the third photo below.

The heated dough was removed from its container and rolled out using my heavy rolling pin. The dough was rolled out to 16. The dough did not roll out quite as easily as the dough made using my food processor, but it was still far easier than if I were rolling out an unheated dough. It took maybe a few minutes longer, plus I was rolling out to a larger size. From the 16 skin, I cut out a skin of 15. The weight of the 15 skin was 9.70 ounces. I calculated a thickness factor for the 15 skin of 0.063, which was within normal range based on my recent experiments. As before, I dusted the final skin, folded it in quarters, encased it in plastic wrap, and put it in the refrigerator. It remained in the refrigerator for 2 days and 4 hours, at which point I brought it out to room temperature and let it warm up, still in the plastic wrap, for an hour and a half.

When I was ready to use the dough skin, I noticed that it had shrunk about a half-inch while in the refrigerator. However, using my rolling pin, I was able easily to restore the skin to its 15 size. I then docked the skin on both sides and fitted it within my 14 cutter pan that I had pre-oiled in order to get increased bottom crust browning. The cutter pan was then placed in a 475-degree F preheated oven, on the lowest oven rack position, for about 5 minutes. The cutter pan was then removed from the oven to dress the pre-baked crust.

As a change of pace, I decided to make a Mexican-style pizza that was inspired by a favorite tostada that I make using fresh chorizo from a local Mexican butcher shop and shredded quesadilla cheese, which is a mild-tasting Hispanic cheese similar to mozzarella cheese and often recommended for use on pizza. I put the shredded quesadilla cheese on the pre-baked crust and distributed small pieces of the chorizo, which I had lightly sauteed until pink, over the cheese. There was no pizza sauce. The dressed pizza was returned to the oven and baked for 7 minutes, again at 475 degrees F, on the lowest oven rack position. I then moved the pizza to the top oven rack position for about 1 minutes of additional baking, mainly to get a bit more browning of the quesadilla cheese. I noticed throughout how well the cheese held up to the oven heat.

The photos in the next post show the finished pizza. The crust of the pizza was crispy and crackery although the texture was a bit different than the crust made using the food processor. It was perhaps a bit more tender with a texture that reminded me of a thinner version of the first pizza I made and reported on in this thread. However, the crust was flavorful and enjoyable nonetheless. At some point I plan to make a dough for a larger sized pizza (14) using my food processor to see if the end results are the same as using the stand mixer.

Peter
« Last Edit: August 07, 2008, 10:13:57 PM by Pete-zza »


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #50 on: November 12, 2007, 11:07:30 AM »
The photos below show the finished pizza, a single slice as I cut it out of the finished pizza, and a second slice that I enhanced with additional toppings. Specifically, I added some Mexican picante sauce (medium heat) to the second slice as shown below, along with some chopped fresh tomatoes, shredded lettuce and a couple of dollops of sour cream. That combination was exceptional, with several different textures, flavors, heat (from the jalapeno peppers in the picante sauce) and temperatures. The unadorned slice was also very tasty in its own right.

Peter

Offline scott r

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #51 on: November 12, 2007, 11:46:49 AM »
Does anybody have a good pizza sauce recipe ? Im glad I got into making my own pizzas as all the "Good" pizza joints around here are going to pre-made crusts and they are horrible.

I think the classic sauce style for this type of pizza (at least what I have had various pizzerias in the midwest where this style is the most prevalent) is fairly pasty when compared to other sauces.  Usually I suspect something like Escalon's Bonta or the Stanislaus Saporito extra heavy rather than a tomato base with texture like a whole peeled, crushed, or a puree.  The tendency is not to thin these down as much as you would for a typical NY style slice.

In a home setting a simple Hunts or Contadina tomato paste would be the closest thing to the Saporito or Bonta. 

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #52 on: November 12, 2007, 08:48:30 PM »
The photos below show my latest cracker-style pizza based on the modified DKM cracker-style dough recipe.

The dough for this pizza was made almost identically to the last dough but for a few small changes. First, I used room temperature water instead of water at 135 degrees F on the basis that the dough would get plenty of heat in the proofing box without the need for the water temperature to be elevated to 135 degrees F. Second, I autolysed part of the flour (about half of it) and the total formula water, without the IDY mixed in with the flour as I did the last time. Instead, the IDY was combined with the rest of the dry ingredients (the rest of the flour, salt and sugar). Third, once the dough ball was formed from the popcorn-like dough pieces, the dough ball was put into the proofing box for 2 hours instead of 1 hours. This small change appears to have been the most significant since the dough was very easy to roll out. In all respects, the dough and the rolled out skin at every stage were virtually identical to the last dough. The photos of the two dough balls up to the point where the skins were placed in the refrigerator were virtually indistinguishable.

After the skin was removed from the refrigerator (after about 2 days), it was prepared essentially identically to the last one except that I did a better job of fitting the latest skin into my 14 cutter pan, and I went back to the basic pepperoni style. As with the last skin, the one I worked on today shrunk a bit while it was in the refrigerator. However, I was able very easily to roll it back out to its original size (and more if I wanted) to nicely fit the cutter pan. The skin was docked on both sides before placement in the cutter pan (pre-oiled) and it was pre-baked for about 4 minutes on the lowest oven rack position. The dressed pre-baked crust was baked for 8 minutes on the lowest oven rack position and for 2 minutes on the upper rack position, all at 475 degrees F.

The finished pizza was also very much like the last one in terms of the degree of crispiness and cracker quality. Interestingly, neither had the layered or flaky characteristic of the crusts that were based on using the food processor to make the two doughs. At this point, I would give the nod to the food processor over my KitchenAid mixer because of the ease and speed of preparation of the dough using the food processor and the more flaky cracker quality that I got (and liked) when I used the food processor to make the doughs. It remains to be seen if I can reproduce the results using the food processor for a larger pizza (14 vs. 12).

I think the most significant advancement to date is the use of the proofing box to heat the dough before rolling it out. That technique pretty much solves the problem that a lot of people have had rolling out the DKM low-hydration dough (or any other low-hydration dough). It is the method I plan to use with future low-hydration doughs, at least until I find a better way. As future experiments unfold on this style, I will report back to the membership.

Peter

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #53 on: November 14, 2007, 12:51:11 AM »
Latest cracker crust....Tonites pie inspired by Peter. Taco pizza made with the following crust recipe last posted by Peter. Perfect for a 16" pie with no extra dough left over.

Flour (100%):
Water (36%):
IDY (1%):
Salt (1.75%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (3.5%):
Sugar (1.2%):
Total (143.45%):
 278.15 g  |  9.81 oz | 0.61 lbs
100.13 g  |  3.53 oz | 0.22 lbs
2.78 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.92 tsp | 0.31 tbsp
4.87 g | 0.17 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.87 tsp | 0.29 tbsp
9.74 g | 0.34 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.14 tsp | 0.71 tbsp
3.34 g | 0.12 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.84 tsp | 0.28 tbsp
399.01 g | 14.07 oz | 0.88 lbs | TF = 0.07
Note: Pizza size entered into the tool is 16; desired final pizza size is 15; no bowl residue compensation.

After making the dough, it rested on the counter for 24 hours. Then seeing as I don't have a proofing box as Peter described I filled a container with water that was 105-110 degrees and submerged the container of dough in it holding it down with a strip of duct tape and covered with a towel, added more hot water as needed to maintain temp. Proofed like that for about an hour, flipping the dough ball once. Dough rolled out great with no problem at all.

I rolled it to 16", docked on both sides and par-baked for 5 min. in a 500 degree oven on a fibrament pzza stone. I don't have a cutter pan so what I do is generously oil with olive oil or ghee on one side then stick heavy duty foil 18" wide to the oiled side and flip onto pizza peel. Then the foiled side goes to the stone for the par-bake. After I let it cool, then oil the top side before topping. Topping was a mix of diced tomatoes (drained) mixed with some taco sauce about 50/50, onions, gr peppers, bl olives and burger pre-fried with Tones taco seasoning, mozz and cheddar cheese with a little extra pizza seasoning sprinkled on. A few jalapeno peppers on 1/2 for me as the bride doesn't like them as much. Back in the oven til done at 475 on the foil/stone. Probably one of the best, crispiest crusts to date, Bubbley, crunchy and snapped when I ran the cutter thru it. I gotta figure a way to stop the maddness. Too many pizzas, and too many extra pounds going on. I guess I can blame all you guys for such a great wealth of info here ;-)   Great work guys, following is the latest pics.....
Jon

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #54 on: November 14, 2007, 09:51:53 AM »
Jon,

I'm glad that you were able to make the process work for you. I'm pleased also to see that you used the dough warming method at the end of the fermentation rather than at the beginning as I did. That is something I was planning to do at some point but hadn't gotten around to it just yet. What machine did you use to prepare the dough?

These pies can become addictive.

Peter

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #55 on: November 14, 2007, 10:28:27 AM »
Hi Peter,
I have a new Kitchen Aid Pro 600. I used the paddle on low/stir speed til it started to tighten up a bit then let rest/autolyse for 15 minutes then put that new fangled hook on for another 6-7 minutes. I gave my old KA to one of my daughters. I'm going to have to go get me a new, decent food processor though to try the dough out on that. Need one anyway for making my pasta dough, getting a real bad jones for some scratch pasta, especially leftover, thick-cut noodles fried in butter in the morning with some eggs....mmmmmm
Jon
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Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #56 on: November 14, 2007, 01:50:11 PM »
Hi Peter,

Have you decided to keep the par-baking in the recipe to reduce the "gummy-layer" below the toppings? Or do you feel the par-bake gives rise to more air pockets in the crust? -D

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #57 on: November 14, 2007, 02:46:01 PM »
Dan,

I have decided to pre-bake mainly because I think it gives me greater control over the process and the end product, mainly in terms of the crispy and cracker characteristics of the finished crust. With pre-baking, I don't have to worry so much whether the cheese, sauce and toppings will be too weighty on the crust and slow down the bake such that I end up with a crust that isn't crispy or crackery enough for my taste. Also, I may not have to worry so much whether the skin is thin or thicker.

With my home oven and based on what I have learned so far, I think I will be inclined to use the pre-bake whether the dough is a low-hydration dough or a medium-hydration dough. I might change my mind if I go to a lamination method, as John has done with some of his experiments. Absent some form of lamination, I don't think that you can get around having to use a pre-bake with a medium-hydration dough (for example, a dough with a hydration of about 45-50%). With such a dough, I don't think you can load it up with cheese, sauce and toppings and expect to bake it in a home oven and produce a crust that is crispy and crackery. There is just too much mass for the oven heat to penetrate and drive out the moisture such that you end up with a dry and crispy and crackery crust. In that case, I think the risk of getting a pasty crust is fairly high. It is less with a low-hydration dough. However, it can still be an iffy proposition with a low-hydration dough. You might get a great crispy and crackery crust but, then again, you might not. My recollection from reading the posts on DKM's cracker-style dough recipe is that a lot of the members have been using a pre-bake.

Obviously, pre-baking crusts is impractical in a commercial setting. I am sure that the higher oven temperatures (around 650 degrees F) that are available with commercial deck ovens, along with laminating the doughs using a commercial sheeter, will allow one to bake pizzas without using a pre-bake and end up with a crispy and crackery crust. It may not matter whether the dough is a low-hydration dough or a medium-hydration dough. In my home setting, I have found that laminating skins is very hard. I haven't yet tried laminating a skin made from a warm low-hydration dough as I have been experimenting with, so I can't say yet whether it is a viable method. If so, I think I should be able to bake the pizza directly on a pizza stone, or in a cutter pan, without using a pre-bake. But I won't know for sure until I try it.

What I am ultimately after is coming up with a "system" that increases the likelihood of success by the people who try it.

Peter
« Last Edit: November 14, 2007, 02:47:50 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #58 on: November 14, 2007, 03:24:38 PM »
Peter, Dan,
Although I've been making homemade pizzas for years this site and you guys have helped immensely, and my research not being as vast as you guys, in my experience the par-bake WAY out runs 'not' doing it for that crispy, bubbly, crunch as my last photos show. Also on a commercial level my favorite pizza joint, Savoy's Pizza in St Paul, MN uses par-baked crusts. I think they bake them off during the day, because when we go there to eat all the crusts are pre-rolled, and look par-baked and stacked above the prep station. They reach up and grab the size they want, top (generously) with toppings of choice and into the oven. It's a sturdy, cracker type of crust. Not as bubbly and crunchy as what we've been doing here but close. This last crust I did was one of the best yet. I found a good re-heating method rather than nuking and getting a soft crust or having to start up the whole oven is to put a couple slices in a large non-stick skillet, covered on low. Crust is snappy crispy and heats thru very nicely.
Jon
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Offline mbusse

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Re: Pete-zza Does DKM Cracker Style
« Reply #59 on: November 14, 2007, 04:24:47 PM »
Pete,

I see you use vegetable oil in the latest test. Do the results vary if you use olive oil?
I looked but could not find a reference to the reason for using veg oil.

I will be trying this recipe and cooking at about 700F without prebake to see what I get.

Mark