Author Topic: Deep Dish Cooking  (Read 6601 times)

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Offline Foccaciaman

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Deep Dish Cooking
« on: September 30, 2004, 05:05:08 PM »
I was recently having a deep dish pizza at my favorited Deep dish pizza place (Davanni's). It has a fantastic crust which I cannot duplicate nor have I found its equal.  I suppose in some ways it is quite similar to the Pizza Hut Pan pizza with its oily crunchy almost garlic toast like bottom. But it is far superior in my opinion.

But when served in the resturaunt (and I have had this in a few other resturaunts also) it comes in the pan, but it is also sitting on a sort of pan fitting cooling rack. Now I had always assumed that this was done after the cooking, but I do not understand why. As many Chicago Deepdish pizzas come just sitting in the pan.

Then I began to wonder if it was possible to cook it this way. Leaving about 1/2 inch space between the crust and the hot oil on the bottom of the pan. I also wondered if this is the way that they achieve their results. Perhaps it would even be possible to par-bake the pizza, then removing it and placing a rack/spacer in the pan and returning it to the oven for the final bake.

Anyone have any comments or ideas on the subject.
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Re:Deep Dish Cooking
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2004, 03:43:36 PM »
About the only way I see to do this to a par-baked pizza would be with one of those removable-bottom pans.  Otherwise you (well, ok, I) would mangle the pizza trying to remove it from the pan!  Does the pizzaria use a removable-bottom pan?

It seems more like a way to let the bottom of the pizza drain of excess oil.  Is the bottom of the pan really oily when the pizza comes?  Maybe the secret is to use more oil in the pan than the pizza could possibly absorb, then drain.

This doesn't sound healthy...

Offline Foccaciaman

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Re:Deep Dish Cooking
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2004, 08:56:13 PM »
If it tastes great, You know its unhealthy. ;D ;D
Ahhh, Pizza The Fifth Food Group

Offline DKM

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Re:Deep Dish Cooking
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2004, 09:26:00 PM »
Amen brother!
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline RoadPizza

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Re: Deep Dish Cooking
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2006, 05:22:33 AM »
You could try parbaking it first.  After it cools, you can top it and cook it on top of a pizza screen.

Offline Lydia

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Re: Deep Dish Cooking
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2006, 08:43:47 PM »
THe type of crust youre describing could be prone to a couple of issues.

One reason is to prevent steam from causing a soggy crust.  The other would be that if excess oil is in the pan while it cools, this crust will start to absorb that oil like a sponge and it will get way too greasy.

The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline RoadPizza

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Re: Deep Dish Cooking
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2007, 05:09:38 AM »
THe type of crust youre describing could be prone to a couple of issues.

One reason is to prevent steam from causing a soggy crust.  The other would be that if excess oil is in the pan while it cools, this crust will start to absorb that oil like a sponge and it will get way too greasy.



You can avoid a soggy crust by letting it cool down first BEFORE topping it.  Topping it while it's still warm/hot will just deflate the crust.

Also, you need to take it out of the pan after parbaking to avoid the excess grease while it cools down.


 

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