Author Topic: NY Pizza in UK  (Read 7690 times)

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Offline MWTC

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Re: NY Pizza in UK
« Reply #20 on: November 19, 2007, 03:35:28 PM »
Peter,

Check out this flour.

http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=189

I talked to the Rep. at Honeyville and he said this was the closest to the above mentioned flour. What do you think?

MWTC  :chef:


Offline Robin

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Re: NY Pizza in UK
« Reply #21 on: November 19, 2007, 05:20:07 PM »
For the small amount of yeast you are using, have you found it necessary to make seasonal adjustments to your dough formulation or is the place where you store the doughs at a pretty constant temperature year round?

Yes I do have to make seasonal adjustments to the amount of yeast I use. In summer the amount is nearer 1/4 tsp whilst in winter the amount is nearer 1/2 tsp.

Robin

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: NY Pizza in UK
« Reply #22 on: November 19, 2007, 06:07:31 PM »
Peter,

Check out this flour.

http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=189

I talked to the Rep. at Honeyville and he said this was the closest to the above mentioned flour. What do you think?

MWTC,

I would have to see the corresponding specs for the French 55 flour. However, I will tell you that unless the Honeyville flour is made from the same grains as the French flour, I will be hard to convince that the Honeyville flour will perform comparably. It's the same thing as comparing the Caputo 00 flours with domestic flours. On more than one occasion, I saw Tom Lehmann recommend a domestic flour to someone who asked about 00 flour solely on the basis of comparable protein content. King Arthur's 00 clone is likewise a poor analog to the imported 00 flours. The grains are different. It's only when the grains are the same or nearly the same that a meaningful comparison can be made. That is why you will find that the All Trumps high-gluten flour and the King Arthur Sir Lancelot high-gluten flour are quite similar (and their specs show this).

Peter

Offline MWTC

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Re: NY Pizza in UK
« Reply #23 on: November 28, 2007, 03:59:51 PM »
Robin,

What type/brand of cheese are you using, are you mixing types?

MWTC  :chef:
« Last Edit: November 28, 2007, 04:03:15 PM by MWTC »

Offline MWTC

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Re: NY Pizza in UK
« Reply #24 on: November 29, 2007, 11:40:27 AM »
Peter,

I contacted Shipton Mill and asked them for the specs. on the French White Type 55 flour and they sent me this printout.

MILL RECIPE   RECIPE   F.11%OP.25
   GUSSET   FRENCH TYPE 55   BAG CODE   B860.SPEC/OP.25
   SPECIFICATION   MINIMUM   MAXIMUM
   PROTEIN                  10.5    10.9
   MOISTURE                13.6    14.6
   W/ABS                      57      59
   COLOUR                               1

Does that reveal anything that we can get here in the USA?

MWTC  :chef:

Remember, I contacted the People at Honeyville and they said that this is the closest to the French flour that they have. How does it compare to Shipton from what you can see from the above specs?

http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=189
« Last Edit: November 30, 2007, 04:40:02 PM by MWTC »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: NY Pizza in UK
« Reply #25 on: November 29, 2007, 03:24:10 PM »
MWTC,

I don't know what the codes stand for but from the standpoint of protein content, moisture content, and absorption rate, the French flour most closely mimics a low-protein all-purpose flour, perhaps something like a southern all-purpose flour, not one like the King Arthur all-purpose flour that has a protein content of 11.7%. But that doesn't mean that you can use a domestic all-purpose flour and expect the same results, for the reasons previously mentioned. The Honeyville flour you referenced has a higher protein content than the French 55 (more in the range of bread flour) and it has a higher absorption rate (63% vs. 57-59%).

Peter
« Last Edit: November 30, 2007, 11:31:53 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline MWTC

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Re: NY Pizza in UK
« Reply #26 on: November 29, 2007, 03:47:27 PM »
Peter,

Why is it that Robin can get an electric oven that she is using in Her basement that can get close to 1000 degrees and we can't here in the USA?

MWTC  :chef:

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: NY Pizza in UK
« Reply #27 on: November 29, 2007, 04:59:55 PM »
Peter,

Why is it that Robin can get an electric oven that she is using in Her basement that can get close to 1000 degrees and we can't here in the USA?

MWTC,

I don't believe that Robin said that the oven is in the basement (but rather the dough). Most commercial electric deck ovens in the U.S. don't get up to around 900 degrees F, but here is one that does: http://eeclink.com/products/images/default.asp?item=12741. I don't think you would want to keep that beast in the basement (plus you would need 208-volt, three-phase service).

Peter

Offline Robin

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Re: NY Pizza in UK
« Reply #28 on: November 30, 2007, 04:33:37 AM »
What type/brand of cheese are you using, are you mixing types?
MWTC  :chef:

I use the wet bags of mozzarella which are left to drain for about 5/6 hours. I have not found much difference between the brands available in the UK.

Robin

Offline Robin

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Re: NY Pizza in UK
« Reply #29 on: November 30, 2007, 04:39:23 AM »
Why is it that Robin can get an electric oven that she is using in Her basement that can get close to 1000 degrees and we can't here in the USA?
MWTC  :chef:

Just wanted to clarify I'm a He not a She  :D

Pete is right I keep the dough in the basement and the oven in the kitchen. The oven runs on a domestic single phase supply. However I think maybe the UK domestic voltage is higher than in the US and that is why I can run the oven at a higher temp.

Robin


Offline MWTC

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Re: NY Pizza in UK
« Reply #30 on: November 30, 2007, 10:58:44 AM »
Just wanted to clarify I'm a He not a She  :D
Robin

OOPS  :-[

Sorry DUDE !!!   :-D

Thank-you for sharing your experience and information.

MWTC  :chef:

Offline MWTC

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Re: NY Pizza in UK
« Reply #31 on: November 30, 2007, 11:05:43 AM »
I don't think you would want to keep that beast in the basement (plus you would need 208-volt, three-phase service).
Peter

That might be a tad on the excessive side.  :-D

I'll stick with the 2stone oven for now !!!

MWTC  :chef: