Author Topic: Tonights pizza with Recipe.  (Read 11675 times)

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Offline pizzaisgood

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Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« on: January 08, 2008, 05:53:08 PM »
I've been developing this recipe for about a year now. My family and friends all love it. It is chewy, soft and delicious.

20 oz King Arthur Bread Flour by weight
12 oz filtered water by weight
1.5 tsp Morton Kosher salt
3 tsp honey (raw white preferred but normal honey works fine)
1 tsp ADY

Combine flour and salt together

Warm filtered water in microwave until hand hot and stir in honey until dissolved. Add ADY  and wait until it is frothy.

Combine all ingredients in your mixer. Mix 5 minutes on low, autolyse 5 minutes, then mix on #2 for 5 minutes. The dough should clear the sides of the mixer but not the bottom.

This makes (2) 16.5-17 oz dough balls.

Place dough in oiled bowl, cover and refrigerate for 24-48 hours. 

Let the dough raise on the counter until it is room temperature. Then turn out on floured surface and bake on either a stone or screen at 550 degrees.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2008, 06:11:33 PM by pizzaisgood »


Offline pizzaisgood

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2008, 06:01:37 PM »
My sauce recipe

1) 28 oz can 6in1 ground tomatoes in heavy puree
1 tsp basil
1/2 tsp kosher salt
3/4 tsp ground pepper
1 tsp sugar

Place all ingredients in a large mason jar. Close and shake vigorously!
« Last Edit: January 08, 2008, 06:03:22 PM by pizzaisgood »

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2008, 06:04:27 PM »
pizzaisgood,

Your pizza looks great.

As points of clarification, can you tell me 1) which particular KA flour you used, 1) what brand of Kosher salt you used, and 3) what size pizzas you made?

Do I detect a pizzatools.com pizza screen in your first photo?

Peter

Offline pizzaisgood

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2008, 06:14:22 PM »
pizzaisgood,

Your pizza looks great.

As points of clarification, can you tell me 1) which particular KA flour you used, 1) what brand of Kosher salt you used, and 3) what size pizzas you made?

Do I detect a pizzatools.com pizza screen in your first photo?

Peter

Peter, I used KA bread flour and Morton Kosher salt. The pizza is about 14". I got the screen from a vendor on Ebay a while back. I will check out the ones on pizzatools.com though as I could use a few more.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2008, 06:43:48 PM »
pizzaisgood,

The reason I asked about the screen is because pizzatools.com is the only company I have seen to date that uses overlapping metal at the rim and where the rim is crimped to form what look like rivets. Their screens are made in the U.S. and are more expensive than the screens from competitors. Pizzatools makes good products but lower priced screens from others should work as well in a low-abuse home environment.

Peter

Offline pizzaisgood

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2008, 07:04:42 PM »
Their Screens do seem very similar to mine, but what really caught my eye are the pizza disks. I wonder how those wold work in a home oven? They would certainly be more durable than screens.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2008, 07:21:44 PM »
pizzaisgood,

I have several perforated pizzatools disks with the PSTK coating but haven't done enough experimenting with them to draw any meaningful conclusions. They are more durable than screens but most people in a home environment aren't particularly hard on screens. Professionals use screens thousands of times and ultimately they go out of round and become grungy from all the stuff that ends up in mesh part of the screen. For many operators price is a big consideration so they are more likely to use screens rather than disks, which cost multiples of the screens. I personally am a big fan of the PSTK cutter pans, both perforated and nonperforated. I have found that I can use them as I would disks but with a rim to help contain the cheeses and toppings right out to the edge. I have used them both on and off of pizza stones. The PSTK cutter pans are pricey but amortized over several years of projected use I think they are worth it.

Peter

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2008, 07:50:34 PM »
For those who might be interested in trying out pizzaisgood’s dough recipe but for a different size pizza, I have converted the recipe to baker’s percent format, as follows:

Flour (100%):
Water (60%):
ADY (0.67%):
Salt (1.27%):
Honey (3.7%):
Total (165.64%):
283.5 g  |  10 oz | 0.62 lbs
170.1 g  |  6 oz | 0.37 lbs
1.9 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.5 tsp | 0.17 tbsp
3.6 g | 0.13 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.75 tsp | 0.25 tbsp
10.49 g | 0.37 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.5 tsp | 0.5 tbsp
469.58 g | 16.56 oz | 1.04 lbs | TF = 0.1076
Note: The flour is KA bread flour; the salt is Morton's Kosher salt

The above is for a single 14” pizza. The thickness factor for that size is 0.1076. Entering that value into the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, along with the above baker’s percents and the desired pizza size and the desired number of pizzas, the tool will provide the quantities of ingredients needed. If one wants to use a bowl residue factor to compensate for minor dough losses in the bowl, I would recommend 1.5%.

Peter

Offline pizzaisgood

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2008, 10:14:07 PM »
Here is the second dough ball after a 54 hour raise. I topped it with provolone, feta and italian sausage.
The 54 hour raise has a more developed flavor and is a bit softer. Some things that I will be trying next time I make pizza are to go with more gourmet artisan ingredients such as Giusto's ultimate high gluten organic flour, Hawaiian white honey, and French grey sea salt  and cake yeast. I do not know if the pizza will get any better using "gourmet" ingredients but it should be fun anyway! I will also make my sauce with fresh basil next time.

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2008, 08:11:45 AM »
pizzaisgood,

Another great looking pizza. I can see the telltale signs of long fermentation in the finished crust.

I also think that it is great that you plan to experiment with other flours, honey, fancy salts, and fresh yeast. I like honey in dough because of the rheology (flow characteristics) that honey gives to the dough. Also, if the honey is raw honey, there are several enzymes that bees add to the nectar that help break down complex sugars into simple sugars that feed the yeast, among other things. Typically, commercial honey lacks many of these enzymes because heat is used to extract the honey from the comb and doing this destroys enzymes. I believe the white Hawaiian honey you referred to is organic and raw and may have the full complement of enzymes. Using a higher quality salt will also provide nutrients to the yeast that are lacking or less available in ordinary table salt. It may well be that you won't be able to tell the difference in the finished product from using the alternative ingredients, but who knows? I hope you will report back on your results.

Peter


Offline pizzaisgood

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2008, 10:58:52 PM »
Pete, thanks again for the replies. I will certainly post my results next time I make pizza. I myself prefer honey in dough over sugar. The Hawaiian honey is raw and organic I'm pretty excited to try it out as it tastes very good and is really mild. As far as flour goes I plan on trying my Dough with the Giusto's, Kasl and  Caputo. Do you think Caputo would be suitable for my recipe or is it mostly suited to neapolitan styled pizzas?
I also have an idea to make my dough with a poolish or use the "old dough method" to try and further develop flavor.

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2008, 11:30:59 PM »
pizzaisgood,

One of our members, Les, did a fair amount of research a couple of years ago on honey, as you will see from this post: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1931.msg17060.html#msg17060 (Reply 2).

Looking at your dough formulation, I would describe it as a cross between a NY style and an American style. For that style, I think the Giusto's and KASL flours may make a better fit. I am sure that the Caputo flour would also work but you may not get the same degree of crust coloration as with the other flours, even with the honey. To get the full benefit of the Caputo flour, you would need a very high temperature oven.

Exploring the use of a poolish or old dough preferment should be a lot of fun. I personally would start with the poolish method, which I think is a more direct method than the old dough method. But, whichever method you decide to use, my best advice is to follow the classic methods. Once you master those methods and have learned the principles involved, then you can modify them to your heart's content.

Peter

Offline pizzaisgood

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2008, 05:04:42 PM »
Pete, Les's recipe is actually what inspired me to use raw white honey to begin with. It seems to work out really well in my dough. Btw what is your current favorite recipe for a New York or American style pizza,
and do you have a Pizza in Teglia style recipe that you reccomend?
« Last Edit: January 11, 2008, 05:10:01 PM by pizzaisgood »

Offline jeff v

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2008, 05:20:25 PM »
pizzaisgood,

Another great looking pizza. I can see the telltale signs of long fermentation in the finished crust.


Pete-

So I know what your looking at could you clarify this for me?

Thanks,
Jeff
Back to being a civilian pizza maker only.

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #14 on: January 11, 2008, 05:29:12 PM »
Btw what is your current favorite recipe for a New York or American style pizza,
and do you have a Pizza in Teglia style recipe that you reccomend?

pizzaisgood,

I would have to say that the basic Lehmann NY style dough formulation is my favorite, with a close second being the "geriatric" versions using the alternative KitchenAid dough making method. I also like Canadave's original NY style dough formulation, both the thicker version and my thinner version. For the American style, I would say Randy's original American dough formulation and my thinner versions.

I have not yet ventured into the Pizza in Teglia and Sicilian arenas yet, so I don't have a recipe to recommend. However, I have a nice dark, anodized "Sicilian" pan from pizzatools.com ready when I do decide to try those types.

Peter

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2008, 06:41:49 PM »
So I know what your looking at could you clarify this for me?

Jeff,

I was looking at the irregular surface and mottled coloration of the rim, which is quite typical of a crust that has had good fermentation. If you look carefully, you will also see little blisters. For comparison purposes, take a look at the smooth and uniform surface of the rim of the pizza shown in this post: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6030.msg51667.html#msg51667. That pizza was made using dough with a short fermentation.

For more extreme examples of crusts that were based on doughs with long fermentation times, look at the crusts in these posts: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg37060.html#msg37060 (Reply 35, roughly 6-day old dough), http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg35370.html#msg35370 (Reply 23, roughly 10-day old dough) and http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg40092.html#msg40092 (Reply 57, roughly 15-day old dough). An important thing to note is that none of the geriatric doughs used any sugar, so the crust coloration was due entirely to the natural sugars extracted from the flour. To contrast the last three pizzas with another short-term pizza, made in about 3 hours, see the smoothness and uniform coloration of the crust in the pizza shown at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3146.msg27116.html#msg27116 (Reply 28). Likewise with the pizza shown at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3736.msg43865.html#msg43865 (Reply 18).

Peter
« Last Edit: January 27, 2008, 03:21:55 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline jeff v

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #16 on: January 14, 2008, 01:33:34 PM »
Jeff,

I was looking at the irregular surface and mottled coloration of the rim, which is quite typical of a crust that has had good fermentation. If you look carefully, you will also see little blisters. For comparison purposes, take a look at the smooth and uniform surface of the rim of the pizza shown in this post: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6030.msg51667.html#msg51667. That pizza was made using dough with a short fermentation.

For more extreme examples of crusts that were based on doughs with long fermentation times, look at the crusts in these posts: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg37060.html#msg37060 (Reply 35, roughly 6-day old dough), http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg35370.html#msg35370 (Reply 23, roughly 10-day old dough) and http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3985.msg40092.html#msg40092 (Reply 57, roughly 15-day old dough). An important thing to note is that none of the geriatric doughs used any sugar, so the crust coloration was due entirely to the natural sugars extracted from the flour. To contrast the last three pizzas with another short-term pizza, made in about 3 hours, see the smoothness and uniform coloration of the crust in the pizza shown at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3146.msg27116.html#msg27116 (Reply 28).

Peter



Peter-

What a great lesson!

Thank you so much.
Back to being a civilian pizza maker only.

Offline Fullback66

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2008, 06:37:41 AM »
pizzaisgood,
I am going to make your sauce. I will tell you how it turned out.
fb66

Offline pizzaisgood

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #18 on: January 17, 2008, 08:59:47 AM »
pizzaisgood,
I am going to make your sauce. I will tell you how it turned out.
fb66

Sounds good.

Adam

Offline Chet

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Re: Tonights pizza with Recipe.
« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2008, 09:16:14 PM »


 I am reading alot about baking the pizza, I like your recipes of the dough and the sauce, what can i expect with an oven that will only go to 500 deg.

                      Chet