Author Topic: Neapolitan Dough w/KitchenAid Classic  (Read 1678 times)

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Offline Essen1

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Neapolitan Dough w/KitchenAid Classic
« on: July 10, 2008, 08:17:04 PM »
Hello all,

First off, I'm posting this in the "General" section since it describes two different dough styles and therefore, putting it solely in the "Neapolitan" section seemed inappropriate to me.

Anyway, I figured since there are members on here who are not as lucky as to call a Santos Fork mixer their own, and that includes me unfortunately, I would come up with a different, and hopefully just as effective process, to put together a decent Neapolitan crust, made with a Standard KA Mixer. Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m far from having the same experience as PFT, for example, but thought a little pizza project can’t hurt. Plus, it’s fun and I’m always up for learning something along the way.

PFT’s dough formula, however, has not been changed with the exception of increasing the starter by 1%. I also strongly recommend the use of a high heat oven, such as a WFO, a 2stone or an LBE. If you use a regular home oven, I suggest increasing the hydration level by perhaps 2%, and letting the pizza stone heat up for at least an hour on the lowest rack. 90 mins might even be better.

It would be great if a few members with a KA mixer or something equivalent would give this dough mixing regimen a try and post the feedback here.

Okay, here we go:

Neapolitan Dough w/KitchenAid Classic


Formula for three 275 gr. dough balls, circa 13”-14” diam.

·   495 gr. Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour (100%)
·   296 gr. bottled water (60%)
·   020 gr. Starter 50/50 - fully activated (4%)
·   014 gr. fine-milled sea salt (2.73%)


At this point, the KA Mixer is not needed for the first four steps. All you need is the Mixer's bowl.

Step 1:

Dissolve 200 gr. of flour in the water. I did this by sifting the flour right into the bowl, filled with water. Use a hand held wire whisk and stir until most of the lumps are smoothened out.

Step 2:

Add the starter. With a spatula, completely incorporate the starter, clearing the sides of the bowl from any residue.

Step 3:

Cover the bowl with a damp tea towel and let rest for 45 – 60 mins.

Step 4:

Add the salt. Using the wire whisk again, gently stir to incorporate the salt.

The reason I add the salt last is I’ve read on a few other pizza and baking-related websites that the salt, if added to soon, can be counterproductive to the starter. Since I’m not a scientist, I can’t proof if those statements are correct or not. But since I have always added the amount of salt first, I was inclined to do it in a different way this time.

Okay, now’s a good time to get out the KA mixer, attach the dough hook, in my case it’s the “C” hook. If you have a spiral hook, even better.

Kneading procedure:

Attach the dough hook and on stir speed, slowly add the rest of the flower, occasionally scraping down the sides of the bowl with a spatula so all the flour gets incorporated. When the dough clears the walls of the bowl by itself, turn off the KA, pull the dough off the hook, remove the hook and cover the bowl with a damp tea towel for 15 mins.

In the meantime, clean the hook from the dough residue and re-attach. Also, take the temperature of the dough with an IR thermometer. I find that a temp between 72 – 75 F is adequate.

After 15 mins, give the dough another spin for about 2 mins on stir speed. You can see that the dough is very smooth and silky looking.

Repeat the above process – 15 mins rest, covered with a teat towel. Make sure the hook’s clean before continuing.

Give it one last spin for about a minute – the dough needs to completely clear the walls of the bowl - and remove dough from bowl and onto a lightly floured surface. Hand knead until it feels soft and springy. Form into a ball and cover with a damp towel for 2 hours. Divide into three dough balls, roughly 275 gr., and place them in a lightly oiled container for a room temp rise of  6 – 12 hrs. You could also do a cold-rise for 2 days +.



“Neapolitan” Dough II  w/KitchenAid Classic


Here’s another version with different flour and hydration, that’s why I put “Neapolitan” in quotation marks:

Formula for two 250 gr. dough balls, circa 12” diam.

·   327 gr. King Arthur Bread Flour (100%)
·   190 gr. bottled water (58%)
·   001 gr. ADY (0.3%)
·   009 gr. fine-milled sea salt (2.75%)


At this point, the KA Mixer is not needed for the first four steps. All you need is KA’s mixing bowl.

Step 1:

Dissolve the salt in the water.

Step 2:

Add the yeast. With a whisk or spatula, fully incorporate the yeast.

Step 3:

Add 50% of the flour and with a wire whisk, stir in the flour until it takes on a smooth, batter-like consistency. Let rest for 30 mins.

Step 4:

Kneading procedure:

Same as for the Neapolitan.


Note: I added a little amount, perhaps a ¼ tsp (didn’t measure it in grams), of olive oil to the batter before starting the mixing process and adding the rest of the flour. I know, I know, it’s not very Neapolitan but I found that the dough does very well in my LBE when it includes a little amount of oil.


Currently I have both doughs retarding and will try out Dough formula No.1 tonight and take some pics.

Any feedback is appreciated.

Mike


Edit: Content & Grammar
« Last Edit: July 13, 2008, 08:56:29 PM by Essen1 »
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/


Offline Essen1

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Re: Neapolitan Dough w/KitchenAid Classic
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2008, 04:05:59 PM »
Here are some pics from last night's Neapolitan Dough 1 (pftaylor's formula), made with the KA Mixer.

The crust was excellent. Light and chewy with a nice crunch to it, even though I think the retardation time needs to be increased somewhat to develop a tad more flavor. By how much I don't know yet. Anyway, I made three pies at 275 gr. each. Unfortunately I only have pics of the first two because my camera ran out of juice.

The first one is a half & half - Ham & Tuna - with a Fontina/Mozza cheese combo and some olives thrown on top.

The second one is a Mushroom/olive pizza with the same cheese combo. Both tasted great but have still major room for improvement, in terms of retardation and baking.

I also made a batch (2 dough balls at 250gr/ea.) of the second dough formula which are still fermenting.


First batch:

Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/


 

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