Author Topic: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation  (Read 78650 times)

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Offline imisschicagopizza

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #100 on: August 09, 2009, 07:04:43 PM »
Thanks, Randy.  I think I'm at least in the ballpark, no pun intended.  It's in the oven right now.  Drum roll, please......

Carol


Offline madjack

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #101 on: August 15, 2009, 12:40:57 AM »
...With the bread flour, go ahead and give it a try and let us know how it works for you.  I've been using bread flour lately (KA or Gold Medal) with the Generic Thin and a little milk as a third of the liquid with nice results.  I know, I'm not much help.   :-\

Loo

I had guests over last weekend and was able to do a bread flour version, and an AP version at the same time, with the same toppings.  I didn't try an overnight rise in the fridge yet. The version made with the bread flour was a little less dense, and seemed to have a little more rise, but honestly, you would have to look pretty hard to tell a difference.

I am trying the Generic Thin with the 1/3 milk as you mentioned tomorrow, with 12 hour rise in the fridge. I'll post any noteworthy results in that topic.

Offline mrmojo1

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #102 on: September 01, 2009, 01:27:08 AM »
madjack! im dying to know! did you try the 1/3 milk??  if so what did you think? howd it change the crsut?  thanks man!

Offline madjack

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #103 on: September 01, 2009, 01:31:30 PM »
Sorry, I totally forgot to post... too busy enjoying the results  ;D.


I am posting the results to the Generic Chicago Thin crust thread so as to not goo too far off topic here.

parallei

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #104 on: January 17, 2010, 10:46:40 PM »
I'd never tasted this style of pizza before, so we decided to give it a try.  Whoa!  great stuff!  It might have needed a couple on minutes more here in the Mile-High City, but that gives me an excuse to try it again next weekend.  Photo attached.  Thanks for the recipe....

paralleli

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #105 on: January 18, 2010, 10:15:31 AM »
Paul,

That's a great looking pizza.

Peter

parallei

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #106 on: January 19, 2010, 02:54:31 PM »
Thanks Peter!

We were happy with how it turned out.  With all the experiences shared, and previous work done by others on this board, it's pretty easy to be succsesful.....

Best

Paul 

Offline mrmojo1

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #107 on: January 20, 2010, 01:46:03 AM »
no doubt! that is a delicious looking pizza! ive paid good money and would do again in an instant for a za like that!!!  great job!

Offline WestCountry

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #108 on: January 25, 2010, 11:43:05 AM »
Inspired by everyone's success above, I decided to give this a shot.
It was my first time trying this style pie and decided to also try using scamorza cheese (which we all really liked).

I didn’t have any ADY on hand, so I had to get creative and used IDY with a long room temp fermentation & proof.

Pie came out great. I loved it, and nice break from NY Style. I’ll definitely make it again. Thanks!

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #109 on: January 25, 2010, 01:27:21 PM »
Looks great, WC!   ;D

I'd say you definitely hit a ... homerun. ::) :-D
Let them eat pizza.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #110 on: January 25, 2010, 01:32:23 PM »
Chris,

Very nice. How did you bake the pizza--on a pan/screen or stone--and did you shape the skin by hand or using a rolling pin?

Peter

Offline WestCountry

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #111 on: January 25, 2010, 02:51:21 PM »
Hi Peter,
I baked the pizza on this pan I found in my pantry (15 inch base)...very similar to the attached. It has a little rim which allowed me to get a nice round shape. I wiped a very light coat of corn oil into the bottom of pan with a paper towel, and this seemed to allow the pizza to came right out after it cooked. I did not use a rolling pin and gently formed/stretched the dough in the air with my hands/fingers, then knuckles, then put the dough into the pan and gently formed/worked it towards the edge. It was very manageable dough for me (meaning it formed and spread well, no tearing)... especially for my 11 hour room temp fermentation-proof.

I am definitely adding this to my repertoire of pizza recipes.

Chris

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #112 on: January 25, 2010, 04:50:51 PM »
Chris:

Given the pan you used, I am curious about the consistency of the crust.  Was it crunchy or chewy?

-ME
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Offline WestCountry

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #113 on: January 25, 2010, 05:07:37 PM »
Hi ME,
Thanks for the kudos and question.
The majority of the crust was not crispy, crunchy or chewy... but instead very light, tender and just a little bit fluffy, one of my family members said it was almost a flaky crust, but not quite. I guess and attribute this to the amount of corn oil (24%) in the dough and type of flour. I used the KAAP flour and TF per recipe (.111). The rim where dough was more exposed did have a nice crunch to it though.

Next time I am in Chicago I can't wait to try the real Home Run Inn as well as several other Chicago style pizzerias to experience their true flavors.

Chris

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #114 on: January 26, 2010, 10:42:49 AM »
Chris:

Thanks for the reply.  I'd be curious to find out what results you would get if next time you placed the pizza on a heated stone instead of using the pan.

Again, excellent job.

-ME
Let them eat pizza.

parallei

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #115 on: January 27, 2010, 02:54:18 PM »
Chris:

Looks great, a much more orderly looking pie than mine!

I wasn't pleased with the bottom on my first attempt. First attempt was 475 F on dark perforated disk on the middle rack.  I tried again this last weekend and put the perforated disk right on the stone and it still didn't brown up like I'd hoped.  More biscut like, as you mentioned.  Like you, I used KAAP and 24% corn oil.

Did the bottom of your pie brown up?

Paul

Offline WestCountry

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #116 on: January 27, 2010, 03:47:20 PM »
Paul,
I got some browning on the bottom but it was not a "crispy" style crust (as I would get in a NY style recipe). Definitely more tender style crust. But the cool thing was that the crust held up well, did not get soggy and stayed pretty tender as the pizza cooled.  Next time I will try cooking it on the stone direct just to see the difference.
:)
Chris

Offline jbrom

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #117 on: January 31, 2010, 05:34:33 PM »
loowaters and Pete-zza, you guys are an inspiration. The detailed analysis, your knowledge and commitment, are downright impressive.

I know I’m late to the party, as I've only been reading this site since December 2009. My first attempt at using the posted HRI formulation was as close as I've ever come to the HRI crust taste. Thank you for renewing my interest in trying this crust again. The only problem that I had was trying to get the crust off of the peel onto the pizza stone. It seems as if this was a problem in early posts, for others as well, and why I assume that the main recipe calls for pressing the dough into a pan.

I haven't read every post, but I did want to provide my knowledge of the HRI operation if it could help the overall discussion...and if you guys are still interested in tweaking this recipe. I’d love for the dough to be less oily and be able to use a pizza stone in the process. At least for me, this is the way that I remember making them.

I worked in the Darien HRI location the summer in 1987. We made the pizzas from ingredients delivered from (what I assumed was) the main 31st location. The dough came in large plastic bins (~ 30" x 18" x 18") at least a couple of times a week and we stored them in the fridge downstairs until we needed them. Pizzas at this location seemed to be created using the "older" method at that time.

* The dough was not pre-portioned in the bins. For the summer I was there, only one guy typically had responsibility for the rolling out the dough according to the pizza size on the order. From experience, he knew how much dough to use from the bin. He would just grab "about" the right amount from the dough bin, form it by hand into a very thick frisbee shape, and pass it though two sheeters to reduce the thickness. His job was done when the flattened dough was on a lightly floured pizza peel.
* The pizza would travel down one of the two kitchen assembly lines creating the finished product. Usually, with at least 3 people on a side, and the “cheeser” at the end who had some quality control responsibility.
* The crust ring was created by hand. It was basically a two hand process: Thumbs slightly overlapping; index fingers flipping the edge of the dough, up and over; thumbs pinching the dough against the index fingers to create the lip.
* Sauce was applied with a ladle to cover the dough. Oregano sprinkled on top from a shaker. I now wish I remember what sauce we used. Sorry, no help.
* All ingredients, except mushrooms, went on before the cheese. HRI sausage came in the same plastic bins as the dough. It was portioned out by hand, and went on raw.
* Once topped, the pizza would go into the oven until the cheese slightly browned. I think there were two ovens in the location, each identical. With five, rotating 6’ x 2’ stone shelves. The ovens were set to 450-460*

Question: If I would like to use less oil and more salt in the recipe, is there any other adjustments that I should consider. I think that someone mentioned using more salt means using more yeast

Thanks again for the enthusiasm shown on this board. It is very cool.

Jim

Offline loowaters

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #118 on: January 31, 2010, 08:05:37 PM »
Jim, welcome to the board and thanks for your insight in to how it's done, or at least was done, at HRI. 

Peter did some trials on it, and many of us can also attest that oil inhibits oven spring of the crust.  After several trials that had less oil I just kept getting pies that looked right going in to the oven, but nothing like a HRI pie out of the oven.  This formulation is quite close to a Malnati's or Uno's recipe with that oil content, with an addition of salt.

Getting this off the peel was not easy for me either.  I just gave up on it and bought my perforated disks to make these pies after seeing a video of the frozen operation using them to cook the pies.  If I were to revisit it I'm sure I'd have better luck now knowing how the top of the dough ball dries out and becoming the bottom of the skin and taking care to keep it moving on the peel and working quickly. 

Loo

Edit:  Also, the salt and yeast.  The ingredients listing has yeast before salt so there is either more yeast than salt or they are of equal parts.  Equal parts seems unlikely because you'd think that would need to be listed alphabetically.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2010, 08:10:41 PM by loowaters »
Using pizza to expand my waistline since 1969!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #119 on: January 31, 2010, 08:59:06 PM »
Loo,

What type of perforated disk are you using--a plain aluminum (initially unseasoned) disk or one of the dark anodized type?

Peter