Author Topic: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation  (Read 85147 times)

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Online norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #280 on: March 09, 2013, 05:44:34 PM »


I tried clicking on those little papers too earlier for something and found out it works if you click just to the right..on the topic heading...RE:Home run Inn   (or where ever it is you are at).  Click that and it will change the www. location box at the top of your screen...just copy and then paste that.
This is what I'm doing anyway..you probably know a better way.

Bob,

Thanks for telling me to click on the topic heading now.  ;) I see that does work if someone want to copy what was posted before.

Norma
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Offline Garvey

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #281 on: March 09, 2013, 06:11:30 PM »
Great intel on HRI!

That being said, we have to assume that they would certainly hold back some proprietary information.  I just can't see how forum members tweaking oil levels and fermentation times will result in the dough spontaneously forming itself into flaky layers like actual HRI exhibits.  Is that possible?

I just pulled a finished HRI Ultrathin from the oven, cut it, and even this thinner dough shows five to seven layers.  There has to be some sheeting or laminating if some kind, no?

That is why the HRI recipe I tried in this thread was such a complete and thorough failure.  It is not even close to the real thing.  Some essential part of the process is missing.

Online norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #282 on: March 09, 2013, 07:34:53 PM »
These are the ingredients I use for toppings and the rest of the process.  The pizza was dressed on the wooden peel and then it was deposited HRI onto the disk that was already heated on the pizza stone.  The dough was open by hand and rice flour was used on the wooden peel.  The one problem was the bottom crust didn’t get brown enough.  I did try at the end of the bake to take the pizza off the screen and put it right on the pizza stone, but don’t think I did it soon enough.  The crust was flaky (if I understand what a flaky pizza crust really is), but since I never have eaten a real or frozen HRI pizza, I have no idea if my attempt was any good.  I think this attempt could have been baked the whole way on my pizza stone, but am not sure.  There appears also to be what is somewhat of a gum line under the dressings.  Since the pizza crust became cooler the crust got flakier.

Of the thin crust pizzas I have tried so far this was the best for my tastes.  It was tender in the middle of the crust.

Norma 
« Last Edit: March 09, 2013, 07:41:29 PM by norma427 »
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Online norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #283 on: March 09, 2013, 07:37:21 PM »
Norma
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Online norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #284 on: March 09, 2013, 07:39:55 PM »
Norma
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #285 on: March 09, 2013, 08:16:20 PM »
Norma,

The video you mentioned where the HRI employee talks about the 2-3 days of fermentation is in the EDIT at Reply 188 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6112.msg190395.html#msg190395 but with a slightly different URL.

Can you tell us what oven temperature you used to bake the pizza? The bottom crust is on the light side but that could have been due to an oven temperature that was too high and did not allow the bottom crust enough time to brown up more. Next time, you might want to use the perforated disk by itself and form the skin right on the disk and dress it there. 

Also, did you note the weights of the cheese and sauce? And how did you arrive at the weight of the dough for the pizza?

I suspect that originally HRI used fresh yeast, and then went to ADY until IDY was invented. It is still possible I suppose that HRI is using ADY but the article at http://digital.bnpmedia.com/publication/?i=37488&p=14 states that the yeast is added after the oil is added to the dough. It is possible that the ADY is added dry, that is, without prehydration, but that would seem to be an unnecessary step for a commercial, high-volume operations. It is far easier to add IDY to the dough ingredients.

Overall, I think you did well for a first try. Maybe when Bob sends you a real HRI frozen pizza, you can make another attempt and compare the two pizzas.

Peter

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #286 on: March 09, 2013, 08:33:07 PM »
That being said, we have to assume that they would certainly hold back some proprietary information.  I just can't see how forum members tweaking oil levels and fermentation times will result in the dough spontaneously forming itself into flaky layers like actual HRI exhibits.  Is that possible?

Garvey,

I seriously doubt that HRI uses any lamination method. For its stores and for its frozen pizza operation, it uses hot dough presses. In fact, for the frozen pizza operation, you can see the dough presses at page 24 of the article at http://digital.bnpmedia.com/publication/?i=37488&p=14. I believe that the flakiness comes from the way the ingredients are combined in their mixers, which is also discussed at page 24 of the article mentioned above. From the article, it also sounds like the dough goes right from the mixer to the chunker, and the dough pieces are then divided, rounded, manually checked for weight and racked. The article is silent as to whether the racked dough balls are fermented before processing through the dough presses.

Peter

Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #287 on: March 09, 2013, 09:00:10 PM »
I've got an HRI forzen pizza in the oven right now -- MAN does it smell good!

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #288 on: March 09, 2013, 09:27:44 PM »
Just finished eating some of the frozen HRI.  This will probably get me in trouble, (  >:D ), but to be honest, I found it really bland.  I'm not sure how much the freezing has to do with that, or if pizzas from the shops taste that way too.  It was better than most other frozen pizzas I've had, but to be honest I can think of at least a few local chains in Minnesota that make better pizza of that same style.   :chef:

The dough was very flaky, like a pie crust.  I can discern pronounced layers in the crust...  or, at least I think I can.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2013, 09:31:33 PM by CDNpielover »

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #289 on: March 09, 2013, 09:33:50 PM »
Norma,

The video you mentioned where the HRI employee talks about the 2-3 days of fermentation is in the EDIT at Reply 188 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6112.msg190395.html#msg190395 but with a slightly different URL.

Can you tell us what oven temperature you used to bake the pizza? The bottom crust is on the light side but that could have been due to an oven temperature that was too high and did not allow the bottom crust enough time to brown up more. Next time, you might want to use the perforated disk by itself and form the skin right on the disk and dress it there. 

Also, did you note the weights of the cheese and sauce? And how did you arrive at the weight of the dough for the pizza?

I suspect that originally HRI used fresh yeast, and then went to ADY until IDY was invented. It is still possible I suppose that HRI is using ADY but the article at http://digital.bnpmedia.com/publication/?i=37488&p=14 states that the yeast is added after the oil is added to the dough. It is possible that the ADY is added dry, that is, without prehydration, but that would seem to be an unnecessary step for a commercial, high-volume operations. It is far easier to add IDY to the dough ingredients.

Overall, I think you did well for a first try. Maybe when Bob sends you a real HRI frozen pizza, you can make another attempt and compare the two pizzas.

Peter


Peter,

Thank you for telling me where the HRI employees talks about the 2-3 days of fermentation on the link from your post. 

I used an oven temperature of about 440 degrees F and had heated my pizza stone for an hour before I baked the pizza.  In my next attempt I will either try this at market on the perforated disk on the stone, or at home just on the perforated disk.  I will also dress on the screen next time.

I did note the weight of the sausage before I deposited pieces of it.  The sausage link before the casing came off was 4.2 oz.  The sauce was 4.5 ounces and the blend of mozzarellas was 5 ounces.  I just used the whole weight of the dough with the bowl residue compensation added.  I did not subtract the bowl residue compensation because I really didn’t know how this attempt would turn out, so I sure wasn’t being too precise.

I only wanted to try ADY to see what would happen and used a high amount of ADY.  Thanks also for the link to the second article that stated that the yeast is added after the oil is added to the dough.  I can understand it is far easier to add IDY to the dough ingredients for a commercial, high-volume operation.  I will used IDY the next time. 

I can make another attempt when Bob sends me a frozen HRI pizza.  My daughter also said she might take me to Maryland in the next couple of weeks to pick-up a couple of HRI frozen pizzas.

Norma
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Offline mrmojo1

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #290 on: March 09, 2013, 10:00:50 PM »
Hey Norma!  that HRI of yours looks fantastic!!!  your sauce looks wonderful!  how did you prepare it if you dont mind me asking!! the way you desribe the crust sounds excellent.  i love it when it is not too thick, you get that nice gumlayer and some tenderness in the middle! really looks awesome!! you rock!!!

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #291 on: March 09, 2013, 10:09:34 PM »
Hey Norma!  that HRI of yours looks fantastic!!!  your sauce looks wonderful!  how did you prepare it if you dont mind me asking!! the way you desribe the crust sounds excellent.  i love it when it is not too thick, you get that nice gumlayer and some tenderness in the middle! really looks awesome!! you rock!!!

mrmojo1,

Thank you for your kind comments!

I just used the Classico Crushed Tomatoes from Walmart right out of the can.  I think they taste like 6-in-1s.  Classico Crushed Tomatoes are made by Escalon.  Since I used sausage I didn’t want to add any spices to the Classico Crushed Tomatoes.  Did you ever try the Classico Crushed Tomatoes?

Norma
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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #292 on: March 09, 2013, 10:30:21 PM »

Peter,

After I read over that article better and reread the pages that you referenced at http://digital.bnpmedia.com/publication/?i=37488&p=14 it says on page 24 that vegetable oil is used in HRI dough.  Do you really think anyone should change to vegetable oil instead of corn oil when making an attempt on a HRI pizza?

Norma
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Offline mrmojo1

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #293 on: March 10, 2013, 12:22:17 AM »
hi norma!  ive never tried classico!  I am going to now!! thank you!

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #294 on: March 10, 2013, 09:47:07 AM »
After I read over that article better and reread the pages that you referenced at http://digital.bnpmedia.com/publication/?i=37488&p=14 it says on page 24 that vegetable oil is used in HRI dough.  Do you really think anyone should change to vegetable oil instead of corn oil when making an attempt on a HRI pizza?

Norma,

If you look at the ingredients list for a typical HRI frozen pizza, for example, an HRI frozen sausage pizza, at http://www.homeruninnpizza.com/frozen-pizza/details?alias=classic-sausage, you will see that the oil used in their dough is corn oil. Corn is a vegetable, so corn oil is generically a "vegetable oil". All of the HRI frozen pizzas use corn oil in the dough. If they are using soybean oil, which is most commonly referred to as a vegetable oil, I have not read anything to suggest that soybean oil is being used.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 10, 2013, 09:49:43 AM by Pete-zza »

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #295 on: March 10, 2013, 09:58:13 AM »
ive never tried classico!  I am going to now!! thank you!

Terry,

HRI has always made a big point of the fact that they use a puree because of its supposed better flavor. They say that it is a thick puree and they also water it down a bit and add a little bit of oregano and black pepper. The Classico puree is sold at some Wal-Marts so you might want to be on the lookout for that product at your local Wal-Mart.  This is what that product looks like: http://www.walmart.com/ip/Classico-Heavy-Tomato-Puree-28-oz/19399875.

Peter


Offline Steve

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #296 on: March 10, 2013, 10:40:16 AM »
I just used the Classico Crushed Tomatoes from Walmart right out of the can.  I think they taste like 6-in-1s.  Classico Crushed Tomatoes are made by Escalon.  Since I used sausage I didn’t want to add any spices to the Classico Crushed Tomatoes.  Did you ever try the Classico Crushed Tomatoes?

Norma, are you sure about that? Your post intrigued me since I love Escalon 6-in-1 tomatoes (fortunately, my local Kroger carries them). But, if Classico is made by Escalon then I'd like to try some!

I went to Classico's website and it appears that Classico is made by Heinz (not Escalon) as this is what I found:

Looking for your favorite Classico® Canned Tomato products? Enter a ZIP code below, then click the "Find It" button to locate a Walmart® store near you. If you can't find what you're looking for, contact H.J. Heinz Company, L.P. customer service by using our contact us form or call 1-888-337-2420 to find out which Walmarts in your area have them in stock.
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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #297 on: March 10, 2013, 10:48:12 AM »
Steve,

See Reply 8 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,16096.msg162383.html#msg162383. A good part of the thread is devoted to this subject.

Peter

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #298 on: March 10, 2013, 10:48:57 AM »
Norma, are you sure about that? Your post intrigued me since I love Escalon 6-in-1 tomatoes (fortunately, my local Kroger carries them). But, if Classico is made by Escalon then I'd like to try some!

I went to Classico's website and it appears that Classico is made by Heinz (not Escalon) as this is what I found:

Looking for your favorite Classico® Canned Tomato products? Enter a ZIP code below, then click the "Find It" button to locate a Walmart® store near you. If you can't find what you're looking for, contact H.J. Heinz Company, L.P. customer service by using our contact us form or call 1-888-337-2420 to find out which Walmarts in your area have them in stock.
Here you go Steve...http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,15703.msg154848.html#msg154848
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Offline Steve

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #299 on: March 10, 2013, 10:54:47 AM »
I should have known better than to question Norma!  :-[
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