Author Topic: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation  (Read 115952 times)

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Offline mrmojo1

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #250 on: March 07, 2013, 10:54:09 PM »
I'm liking the looks of that cheese blend too!  dang!
"My Doctor says I swallow a lot of aggression.  Along with a lot of pizzas!!"


Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #251 on: March 07, 2013, 11:13:47 PM »
woah! that looks pretty awesome to me.   Great job Bob!  cant wait to hear and see the next one!!
Thank you Terry...but you are much too gracious.  :angel:
I have another batter on deck and hope that this next hitter has the stuff to hit a Home Run!  >:D

Bob
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Offline mrmojo1

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #252 on: March 08, 2013, 12:06:21 AM »
Hey Bob!! you got some nice leoparding going on too.  those are some dark spots!  looks tasty!!! and yet still flowing cheese elsewhere!  hmmmm.  i need to change somthin!!
"My Doctor says I swallow a lot of aggression.  Along with a lot of pizzas!!"

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #253 on: March 08, 2013, 08:52:46 AM »
Thanks for posting the pictures.  Your HRI clone attempt looks very pleasing to my eyes.   ;) How did you bake that pizza?  How would describe the crust texture when eaten and what texture does a real HRI pizza have?
Norma,

I recall asking Loo the same types of questions long ago when we first started to work on an HRI clone. You can read his response at Reply 2 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6009.msg51557.html#msg51557. I would say that his description was apt, but I would add that there is flakiness to the HRI crust. You can see that if you peel back the crust to see the insides.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #254 on: March 08, 2013, 09:33:42 AM »
Norma,

I recall asking Loo the same types of questions long ago when we first started to work on an HRI clone. You can read his response at Reply 2 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6009.msg51557.html#msg51557. I would say that his description was apt, but I would add that there is flakiness to the HRI crust. You can see that if you peel back the crust to see the insides.

Peter

Peter,

Thank you for linking me to Loo’s post where his descriptions of the crust were.  I am interested in finding that flakiness in an HRI crust.  I don’t think I have ever tasted a pizza with flakiness in the crust. 

I might try an attempt on a HRI pizza this weekend.  Would you recommend I try my 10” cutter pan, or just bake on my pizza stone at home?

Norma

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #255 on: March 08, 2013, 10:20:57 AM »
I might try an attempt on a HRI pizza this weekend.  Would you recommend I try my 10” cutter pan, or just bake on my pizza stone at home?
Norma,

As best I can tell from my research, there are basically three versions of the HRI dough over its long history. The first version was a dough that went through a sheeter, the worker formed a rim and, after dressing, the pizza was baked in a deck oven. The next iteration is the one used in the HRI stores today where the dough is hot pressed, placed on a perforated dark anodized disk, formed with an upstanding rim, dressed, and baked in a conveyor oven. The third and final iteration is the frozen HRI pizza where the dough is hot pressed, pre-baked without a carrier in a conveyor oven, dressed, and baked a bit more, and then flash frozen. HRI claims that the dough recipe has not changed over the years despite these multiple versions. I am not entirely convinced of that but the best data we have is for the HRI frozen pizzas.

So, you have multiple choices. Since you have a cutter pan, which I assume is not perforated, you might use that but it would not be true to the methods used at HRI over the years, although I think you should still be able to get a good pizza out of it. I believe that it is also possible to use a pizza screen in lieu of a disk. As you may know, pizza operators are increasingly going from screens to disks in conveyor ovens so that would suggest that either carrier should work in a conveyor oven. Of course, in your case, you would be using a home oven.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #256 on: March 08, 2013, 11:56:01 AM »
Norma,

As best I can tell from my research, there are basically three versions of the HRI dough over its long history. The first version was a dough that went through a sheeter, the worker formed a rim and, after dressing, the pizza was baked in a deck oven. The next iteration is the one used in the HRI stores today where the dough is hot pressed, placed on a perforated dark anodized disk, formed with an upstanding rim, dressed, and baked in a conveyor oven. The third and final iteration is the frozen HRI pizza where the dough is hot pressed, pre-baked without a carrier in a conveyor oven, dressed, and baked a bit more, and then flash frozen. HRI claims that the dough recipe has not changed over the years despite these multiple versions. I am not entirely convinced of that but the best data we have is for the HRI frozen pizzas.

So, you have multiple choices. Since you have a cutter pan, which I assume is not perforated, you might use that but it would not be true to the methods used at HRI over the years, although I think you should still be able to get a good pizza out of it. I believe that it is also possible to use a pizza screen in lieu of a disk. As you may know, pizza operators are increasingly going from screens to disks in conveyor ovens so that would suggest that either carrier should work in a conveyor oven. Of course, in your case, you would be using a home oven.

Peter

Peter,

Thanks for telling me to the best of you knowledge HRI dough has 3 versions of their dough and what they are.

No, my cutter pan is not perforated, but I just brought my Lloyd’s perforated I think that is a pre-seasoned Tuff-Kote dark disk home from market.  Would that be a better option to use, and if it is would I then baked on my pizza stone?  I would guess my disk is a dark anodized disk, but I am not sure.  I recalled that pizza operators are increasing going from screens to disks in conveyor ovens.  I do have a screen at home too. 

Norma

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #257 on: March 08, 2013, 01:02:10 PM »
No, my cutter pan is not perforated, but I just brought my Lloyd’s perforated I think that is a pre-seasoned Tuff-Kote dark disk home from market.  Would that be a better option to use, and if it is would I then baked on my pizza stone?  I would guess my disk is a dark anodized disk, but I am not sure.  I recalled that pizza operators are increasing going from screens to disks in conveyor ovens.  I do have a screen at home too. 
Norma,

I can't say absolutely that a perforated cutter pan will be better than a nonperforated cutter pan since I have not tried the nonperforated cutter pan for the HRI style of pizza. I used my perforated cutter pan on the middle oven rack position of my oven. I did that because I was trying to simulate the frozen HRI pizza (that I had defrosted completely and reassembled after I finished my tests on the pizza) that is baked directly on an oven rack, not on a carrier (like a cookie sheet) or on a stone.

A nonanodized perforated pan or disk should work if the pan or disk is seasoned enough. Costco uses seasoned perforated disks in its conveyor ovens in the food courts where they make their pizzas.

Peter

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #258 on: March 08, 2013, 01:17:06 PM »
Norma,

I used my non perforated dark anodized cutter pan on the rack. I think you would be fine with either your cutter pan you have or the Loyds perforated disc. If you decide to use one of these 2 then I will try my next one directly on a stone so that we have more pies to compare with.

Bob
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Offline norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #259 on: March 08, 2013, 07:10:45 PM »
Norma,

I can't say absolutely that a perforated cutter pan will be better than a nonperforated cutter pan since I have not tried the nonperforated cutter pan for the HRI style of pizza. I used my perforated cutter pan on the middle oven rack position of my oven. I did that because I was trying to simulate the frozen HRI pizza (that I had defrosted completely and reassembled after I finished my tests on the pizza) that is baked directly on an oven rack, not on a carrier (like a cookie sheet) or on a stone.

A nonanodized perforated pan or disk should work if the pan or disk is seasoned enough. Costco uses seasoned perforated disks in its conveyor ovens in the food courts where they make their pizzas.

Peter

Peter,

Thanks for telling me that you can’t say absolutely that a perforated cutter pan will be better than a nonperforated cutter pan since you have not tried the nonperforated cutter pan for the HRI style of pizza. 

I didn’t bring my nonanodized perforated disk home from market, but either I will either try the Lloyd’s seasoned disk or my nonperforated cutter pan. 

Norma

Offline norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #260 on: March 08, 2013, 07:14:54 PM »
Norma,

I used my non perforated dark anodized cutter pan on the rack. I think you would be fine with either your cutter pan you have or the Loyds perforated disc. If you decide to use one of these 2 then I will try my next one directly on a stone so that we have more pies to compare with.

Bob

Bob,

Thank you for telling me you used you nonperforated dark anodized cutter pan on the rack.  Thanks also for telling me you think I should be fine with either my cutter pan or the Lloyd’s perforated disk.  What rack position did you bake on?

Norma

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #261 on: March 08, 2013, 09:58:24 PM »
Bob,

Thank you for telling me you used you nonperforated dark anodized cutter pan on the rack.  Thanks also for telling me you think I should be fine with either my cutter pan or the Lloyd’s perforated disk.  What rack position did you bake on?

Norma
Right in the middle Norma. And with my stone(which is the same as yours)on the rack just above it.
Bob
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Offline norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #262 on: March 08, 2013, 10:25:20 PM »
Right in the middle Norma. And with my stone(which is the same as yours)on the rack just above it.
Bob

Bob,

Thanks so much for telling me what rack you baked on and that you had your stone on the rack just above it.  Do you know what placing the stone above the pizza does for the bake?  Do you always place a stone above the rack when you are baking a pizza like the HRI pizza?  Sorry to be asking so many questions. 

Norma

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #263 on: March 08, 2013, 10:50:26 PM »
Bob,

Thanks so much for telling me what rack you baked on and that you had your stone on the rack just above it.  Do you know what placing the stone above the pizza does for the bake?  Do you always place a stone above the rack when you are baking a pizza like the HRI pizza?  Sorry to be asking so many questions. 

Norma
That's fine Norma, ask all you want...you never turn me away.  :)

With this gas oven that has the burner in the drawer, all of the heat travels up(obviously). And the top rack is really not very close to the ceiling of the oven. So...it won't really help much for top browning(if it is necessary). Having the stone right above the pizza that is baking helps me get the correct amount of top heat..balanced if you will.  Without having to mess around with the juggeling act of putting the pizza down in the drawer(broil) at the last minute.   This works great but does take a little trial and error(which racks to use)   depending on the style of pizza one is baking.
I've described the set-up that will probably give you good results for your HRI attempt. Center rack...disk/cutter pan...stone just above that.
Good luck Norma, you will like this pizza.....I gauuuuurrraaaannteee!   iiiyeee!!  >:D

Bob
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Offline norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #264 on: March 08, 2013, 11:03:00 PM »
That's fine Norma, ask all you want...you never turn me away.  :)

With this gas oven that has the burner in the drawer, all of the heat travels up(obviously). And the top rack is really not very close to the ceiling of the oven. So...it won't really help much for top browning(if it is necessary). Having the stone right above the pizza that is baking helps me get the correct amount of top heat..balanced if you will.  Without having to mess around with the juggeling act of putting the pizza down in the drawer(broil) at the last minute.   This works great but does take a little trial and error(which racks to use)   depending on the style of pizza one is baking.
I've described the set-up that will probably give you good results for your HRI attempt. Center rack...disk/cutter pan...stone just above that.
Good luck Norma, you will like this pizza.....I gauuuuurrraaaannteee!   iiiyeee!!  >:D

Bob

Bob,

I am glad you don’t mind too many questions.   ;D

I am not sure if I will do the bake in my mom’s oven, or my home oven.  My mom is fussy about making any kind of mess in her oven, or her kitchen. 

Thanks for your detailed reply to my questions.  Thanks also for describing the set-up that will probably give me good results with my HRI attempt. 

This is all new to me, so I will see what happens.  Thanks so much for the good luck too.

Norma

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #265 on: March 08, 2013, 11:15:39 PM »
Bob,

I am glad you don’t mind too many questions.   ;D

I am not sure if I will do the bake in my mom’s oven, or my home oven.  My mom is fussy about making any kind of mess in her oven, or her kitchen.  

Thanks for your detailed reply to my questions.  Thanks also for describing the set-up that will probably give me good results with my HRI attempt.  

This is all new to me, so I will see what happens.  Thanks so much for the good luck too.

Norma
Oh...that's right...I forgot that Momma said from now on you are only allowed to cook DS(?) style pizza's in her oven, sorry.  :(

Maybe you could bribe her with a fresh bouquet of flowers(that would be thoughtful)...I have a feeling she may prefer a nice 'lil bottle of your brothers vino though.... ^^^
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Offline norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #266 on: March 08, 2013, 11:28:46 PM »
Oh...that's right...I forgot that Momma said from now on you are only allowed to cook DS(?) style pizza's in her oven, sorry.  :(

Maybe you could bribe her with a fresh bouquet of flowers(that would be thoughtful)...I have a feeling she may prefer a nice 'lil bottle of your brothers vino though.... ^^^

Bob,

Mom said I can only bake Mack's clones, or Detroit style pizzas at her home.  She still gets upset if I get a little bit of flour anywhere. 

I might try to bake my attempt in my home oven first to see what happens.  My heat comes from my bottom coil in my electric oven.  Mine might even be a disaster, so I would want to try it first.   :-D

Norma


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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #267 on: March 08, 2013, 11:32:41 PM »
This is off topic, but Norma, if I understand correctly, you're a grandmother -- right?  does that mean you're cooking in a great-grandmother's oven?  If so, that is SO COOL!  reminds me of when I (as a toddler) used to spend time in my great-grandmother's kitchen, many years ago now.   :chef: :chef: :chef:

Offline norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #268 on: March 08, 2013, 11:39:36 PM »
This is off topic, but Norma, if I understand correctly, you're a grandmother -- right?  does that mean you're cooking in a great-grandmother's oven?  If so, that is SO COOL!  reminds me of when I (as a toddler) used to spend time in my great-grandmother's kitchen, many years ago now.   :chef: :chef: :chef:

CDNpielover,

I am a great-grandmother.  It would be my mother's oven I used a few times.  

I am glad it reminded you of when you were a toddler and spent time at your great-grandmother's.  :) I really like memories too.  My grandmother used to bake in an old-fashioned wood oven in the middle of her kitchen, but she didn't want anyone messing in her kitchen either, but that wasn't my mother's mother, it was my dad's mother.  :-D

Norma

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #269 on: March 08, 2013, 11:42:05 PM »
CDNpielover,

I am a great-grandmother.  It would be my mother's oven I used a few times.  

I am glad it reminded you of when you were a toddler and spent time at your great-grandmother's.  :) I really like memories too.  My grandmother used to bake in an old-fashioned wood oven in the middle of her kitchen, but she didn't want anyone messing in her kitchen either, but that wasn't my mother' mother, it was my dad's mother.  :-D

Norma

Haha, that's awesome!  Again, this is off topic, but thanks for all of your input on this forum.  You're one of my favorite (top 2 or 3) contributors on this forum.   :chef: :pizza:

EDIT:  wait - does that mean the great-great-grandmother is still alive???  (that would be amazing, and SO cool!)

Offline norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #270 on: March 08, 2013, 11:51:38 PM »
Haha, that's awesome!  Again, this is off topic, but thanks for all of your input on this forum.  You're one of my favorite (top 2 or 3) contributors on this forum.   :chef: :pizza:

EDIT:  wait - does that mean the great-great-grandmother is still alive???  (that would be amazing, and SO cool!)

CDNpielover,

Thanks for your kind comment.  I don't want to get off-topic anymore either, but my neither of my grandmothers are alive anymore.  My mom is over 90 years old now.

Norma

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #271 on: March 08, 2013, 11:54:33 PM »
CDNpielover,

Thanks for your kind comment.  I don't want to get off-topic anymore either, but my neither of my grandmothers are alive anymore.  My mom is over 90 years old now.

Norma

Thanks, Norma!  I don't mean to be sappy, but it's really neat that we have about 4 generations of people actively involved on these forums.   :chef: :pizza:  Thank your mother for all of us!   :chef:

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #272 on: March 09, 2013, 12:22:53 AM »
Thanks, Norma!  I don't mean to be sappy, but it's really neat that we have about 4 generations of people actively involved on these forums.   :chef: :pizza:  Thank your mother for all of us!   :chef:
And please tell her we need her oven!  :-*
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Offline norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #273 on: March 09, 2013, 03:35:27 PM »
After reading the article that Peter had referenced before about HRI and how they operate their frozen pizza facility, I decide to try some of their methods.  These are some things taken out of article at http://www.bsimagazine.com/Features/Company%20Profiles/US%20Archive/At%20its%20new%20plant%20Home%20Run%20Inn%20makes%20frozen%20pizza%20the%20pizzaria%20way.aspx?p=1&cck=1 

“We know we offer the best pizza we can make,” he continued. “Our approach has been to make one type of product and keep it simple.” Mr. DeAngelo pointed to the ingredient statement on product packages, saying, “We keep the list short.”

Home Run Inn pizza stands out not only for its simple ingredient statement but also for its unique processing style. Every pizza is baked before it's frozen.

“Conventional frozen pizza is made with a partially baked crust that is frozen first, then topped with cheese, sauce and par-cooked meats, only to be frozen again. That's the standard way,” Mr. DeAngelo said.

“But we are one of only a few companies to manufacture in this style, producing pre-baked pizzas,” he continued. “We use all raw ingredients and par-bake the pizza as a unit. This is just like pizzerias do. It's a process that blends the flavors so you get real pizzeria taste.”

“We take pizza to the next step,” Mr. Perrino said. “We do not double-freeze the crust, so there is no loss of flavor. Because we bake the pizza, the toppings don't fall off as they do with conventional frozen pizza. And we use cryogenic freezing methods to further protect the flavor.”

Home Run Inn chose cryogenic freezing over mechanical and blast styles. Temperatures generated by the liquid nitrogen process reach -50° to -80°F (-45° to -62°C). Each pizza goes directly from the oven to the freezer and within minutes is frozen solid.

“This locks in the flavor we want,” Mr. DeAngelo said.

The cryogenic method prevents dehydration from refrigeration, according to the company. And it opens up future opportunities for new products such as pirogies and ravioli.

Soon after setting up its commercial plant, the company sought the assistance of Tom Lehman of the American Institute of Baking. “What we learned is that we have to stick to the basics, keep up our quality and not be tempted to cut costs,” said Mr. Perrino. “These are expensive choices, but they're what the public wants. And it's what we must do to achieve our plan to ‘take the niche' for premium pizzas in our market area.”

This is one part of that article that I found interesting and what was said. 

“The hardest thing to do under U.S.D.A. standards,” Mr. Perrino said, “is to run a bakery in a U.S.D.A. plant, and that's what we have here.”

After mixing, the pizza dough is allowed to ferment in tubs containing 40-lb batches. The company likes the unique flavor that natural fermentation produces. Tubs are cleaned and sanitized between batches.

“Our dough is given the time to develop flavor naturally,” Mr. Perrino said. “No additives are used to speed up the process. We follow ‘old world' methods that rely on time and natural fermentation.”

After the proper amount of floor time, the dough is dumped into a Benier bread system that divides and rounds individual dough pieces and puts them through a period of intermediate proofing. From the proofer, the dough balls travel along an overhead delivery conveyor into the pressing room. A chute sends the balls to a shallow bin, and an operator manually places the balls on the conveyor leading to the presses.

That part of the article got me to thinking that I wanted to try to get the unique flavor that natural fermentation produces.  The proofing two times also interested me.

I also watched the video that was referenced before at   and this video I found.    In the video I found they said the dough is aged for 2 to 3 days like an Artisan bread.  The showed the dough on that video.  They also showed how to shape the dough and dress it.  I don’t think the second video was posted on either of the HRI threads, but maybe I missed it.

Home Run Inn CEO Joe Perrino appeared on Fox Business in February to about the company's history and our strategy for growth even in the worst of times.


I also read though both of the HRI threads and then this is what I decided to do.  Basically, I use some of the formulations posted here, but changed them a little as what was posted on both threads.  I mixed the dough with the flat beater first, then changed to a dough hook.  The dough mixed fine.  The dough was left in the oven to proof and then was punched down and I am letting it proof again with the oven light on.  From there I will ball the dough and place it into the fridge.  I am not sure if I will be able to make pizza tonight or tomorrow, but with all that yeast that was put into the dough I guess I should try to make the pizza tonight.  I would have tried these methods over two or three days, but didn’t read about it before.  I know am trying to decide how much sauce, cheese and sausage to use on the 10” pizza.

Any comments about what I have done and if I should have changed anything, or still need to change anything?

Pictures of the progression and the formulation I used for a 10” HRI attempt.

Norma
« Last Edit: March 10, 2013, 12:27:51 PM by norma427 »

Offline norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #274 on: March 09, 2013, 03:38:33 PM »
I will have to learn to resize my pictures differently because now they are really off center.

Norma


 

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