Author Topic: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation  (Read 89729 times)

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Offline mrmojo1

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #760 on: April 28, 2013, 04:05:52 PM »
Great to hear from you again Loo!!!!


Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #761 on: April 28, 2013, 04:39:39 PM »
Head hurting.  Trying to catch up.  Must sift through much information.  Want to experiment.  No time. 

Loo
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Pull up a seat an watch me mess up, er I mean, try to recreate HRI pizza.  ;D
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Offline redox

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #762 on: April 30, 2013, 12:17:10 AM »
Jay,
I did one a week ago in a 12"cutter pan. I used some technique that lamination expert member John "fazzari" is helping me with...I inadvertently used a cutter pan instead of his recommended "straight on the stone". I can tell you that mine did not work although it did produce some areas that had very promising crazy good layers/flakiness. I have not given up on this HRI deal and now that my bronchitis is gone I'm back in the saddle.  8)

Bob

Bob,
Glad you're feeling better. A lamination technique sounds interesting. I'll have to get one of my favorite local pizzas and post some pix, they do something like that. I just have no idea how.

Offline pythonic

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #763 on: April 30, 2013, 05:24:28 PM »
Ahhh man...now that Loo is back I may need to participate as well.

Nate
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Offline Gruvypoet

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #764 on: May 08, 2013, 03:38:20 PM »
EVERYONE !
I'm a newbie to the forum (well, as a registered member)
But not a newbie to pizza experimentation (many successes and a few failures)
I just wanna give a shout out to you guys, I feel like the prodigal son who has come back to his family.
I'm looking forward to learning as well as sharing some of my "avant garde" techniques and "home-oven" work arounds !!!!
Lets continue to be the coolest kids on the block by blowing away our friends with KILLER PIZZA !!!
Cheers,
Gruvy

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #765 on: May 08, 2013, 04:33:06 PM »
Sounds groovy to me man!  :)
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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #766 on: May 18, 2013, 01:07:24 PM »
I just spent several hours skimming all 39 pages or so of this thread.  Sorry I didn't read all the post, it is just too overwhelming.  I commend everyone for their efforts.   I've never had an HRI pie, but based on the discription and efforts, I want to give it a try.  Instead of building on everyone's efforts I want to take a slightly new approach.  I have a few thoughts in mind concerning the characteristics of this peculiar crust.  Sorry if any of this has already been discussed or tried but it's where my gut tells me to go.  Again, I apologize for not having read every post here.

1) yeasty flavor.  Of all the doughs I've ever made from emergency doughs to moderately long fermented doughs, the ONLY doughs that had that yeasty taste whether it be pizza or dinner rolls were emergency doughs with around 2% cake yeast.  If you all want that "yeasty" flavor, that is where I would look.

2)Flakiness and use of oil versus solid fats.  I know the ingredients list corn oil and I am aware that Norma mentioned modifying a pie crust recipe.  I make an ETREMELY flaky pie crust that is basically comprised of 50% shortening and 50% AP flour with just a small amount of water, salt, sugar, vinegar, and an egg.  I'm not suggesting using a pie crust recipe for this dough, but I will be starting out with about 25% to perhaps 30%+ butter flavor crisco shortening and then working in small amounts of water to get a semi stiff dough.  I will also be using the pie crust technique of cutting the fat into the flour first.  The crumbles, especially marble sized should help create that layered effect resembling lamination.

My pie crust also calls for a small amount of vinegar.  It is suppose to help relax the gluten.  What I need to know from those of you who have eaten a lot of this pizza is if the crust is chewy at all?  How much chew is there?  A little or a lot or none at all?  Again, I'm not making a pie crust per se, but will use that knowledge to make a HRI clone with similar crust characteristics.

My pie crust recipe also calls for freezing the dough first and then allowing it thaw out.  The reviews that I read on this particular pie crust, one poster commented on how he had tested freezing vs not freezing the pie crust and that there was a difference in flakiness.  Is it possible that HRI is freezing their dough first or keeping them at really cold temps prior to thawing out and making pizza?  Just wondering.   ???

Anyways, I hope to attempt this in the next several weeks and will try to post pictures if I get anything close to what HRI is suppose to look like.

Chau
« Last Edit: May 18, 2013, 01:27:02 PM by Jackie Tran »

Offline norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #767 on: May 20, 2013, 07:03:10 PM »
Chau,

I missed your post because I was away and didn't get an email that you replied on this thread.  I wish you the best when you decide to give your method a try.  ;) I do have two frozen Home Run Inn pizzas left to try and I am interested in trying to see if the Ultra Thin pizza does get those layers in the crust when it is baked.  There is some way that Home Run Inn crusts gets those layers of flakiness, but I sure haven't been able to achieve it yet.

Norma
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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #768 on: May 21, 2013, 12:20:36 AM »
Thanks Norma.  Can you tell me how much chew there is to the crust?  Is the crust a little chewy or not at all?
« Last Edit: May 21, 2013, 12:23:09 AM by Jackie Tran »

Offline norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #769 on: May 21, 2013, 06:49:14 AM »
Thanks Norma.  Can you tell me how much chew there is to the crust?  Is the crust a little chewy or not at all?

Chau,

I never really had a fresh Home Run Inn pizza, but the ones I attempted and the frozen ones I tried had no chew at all if I try to explain them in a context to a NY style pizza.

Norma
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Offline Garvey

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #770 on: May 21, 2013, 06:29:44 PM »
No chew, Chau.  Crunchy bottom that softens towards top.  Should be able to lift a piece and it wouldn't droop at all.

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #771 on: May 23, 2013, 12:26:13 AM »
Thank you Norma and Garvey for the description of the HRI crust.  I really want to try and make this crust, but not ever having had it and only going by pictures and descriptions from members poses a unique challenge to me.

I just mixed up my first batch of experimental dough (one of many I am sure) and wanted to share some thoughts and bounce some ideas off of you HRI experts.

 In keeping with the pie crust technique, I cut the shortening into the flour to make a crumbly texture like that of rough sand.  I opted for this technique b/c I believe this is where the layered effect comes from and not actual lamination of the dough.  I then dissolved my salt and sugar into the water and added the water to the crumbly flour and shortening mixture.  As I began to mix this up, I noticed 2 things right away...
1) the dough resembles my pie dough where I could visually see layers upon layers of dough coming together.  Think flaky lamination effect.
2) the dough felt too dry initially.   I then proceeded to up the amount of water by small increments while I kneaded the dough gently to incorporate the new water until the dough felt "right" to me. 
As I was doing this though I noted that the layering (lamination) effect was disappearing as more and more water was incorporated.   I stopped adding water and worked the dough a bit more with a final hydration of 64% hydration.

I am noting this just to say that I believe the laminating effect in the crust is due to 2 things.  Cutting the oil/fat into the flour first and secondly an overall relatively low hydration dough.  Keeping the hydration low accomplishes 2 things.  One it preserves and layering effect from the fat and secondly it will give that drier crispier and flaky crust.  This would seem to be inline with Garvey's observation that crust doesn't bend or droop when picked up and it is flaky without "chew" to it.   Garvey also shared with me in a PM that when the crust is cut, there will be chips or flakes of crust on the plate. 

Chau
« Last Edit: May 23, 2013, 08:30:57 AM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #772 on: May 23, 2013, 01:14:13 AM »
I went ahead and made a 2nd batch with 60% hydration for pictures and testing purposes. 60% hydration in my dry and elvated climate is closer to a 56% hydration at sea level.  Anywho, this batch felt really too dry to me so I wrapped it in plastic wrap and will let it sit out for a bit to see if it won't soften up.  I'm posting some pictures to show the layering effect in the dough.  Pic 1 is after water is added and dough is beginning to form.  Pic 2, after a short and gentle incoporation of the water.  You can see the dough is flaking off onto the bench.  I don't know if this will translate through post bake.  Who knows, I may just end up with a dense crust.  ???
« Last Edit: May 23, 2013, 08:33:23 AM by Jackie Tran »

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #773 on: May 23, 2013, 01:20:15 AM »
I wanted to ask you HRI experts a question.  When the dough is rolled out, about how thick is it? 1/8" thick?  Also after rolling out and docking, do you sauce and top immediately and the pie goes into the oven right away or is the rolled dough allow to proof up a bit before baking? 

Thanks guys and gal. 
Chau

Offline norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #774 on: May 23, 2013, 07:53:59 AM »
Chau,

I am not an expert on this style of pizza, but have given an HRI pizza a few attempts.  In Peter's Reply to Jay at 678 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6112.msg248622.html#msg248622 you can see what hydration, ADY amount, salt and corn oil were recommended by Peter.  Peter also tells how to prepare the dough in that post.  Jay replies at Reply 680 of what he used.  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6112.msg248691.html#msg248691 Peter also explained more at Reply 713 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6112.msg249182.html#msg249182 Peter gave me advice at Reply 733 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6112.msg249424.html#msg249424 but if you look at what I posted next, I didn't try that. 

Since I never really had a real HRI pizza and only tried the frozen ones, this dough and pizza also pose a unique challenge for me and something I could not get right, especially with the flakiness in the crust. 

Are you really planning on making a clone HRI pizza, or do you just want to make a flaky crust?  If you really want to make a HRI clone, corn oil is used. 

Peter asked me at Reply 348 about if I wanted my mother's pie crust recipe converted to an HRI clone dough.  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6112.msg242823.html#msg242823  If you look at the photos I posted at Reply 372 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6112.msg243063.html#msg243063 you can see the crust was flaky.  When I tried to make the whole pizza, all didn't go well.  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6112.msg243111.html#msg243111

I think if I wasn't trying to make an attempted HRI clone, I might be able to get the flakiness in the crust with another formulation, but every time I did try to make an HRI clone with different problems along the way.  The last attempt I made was good in my opinion, but I think with me rolling the dough more than I should have really didn't make that pizza an HRI clone pizza.

Norma
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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #775 on: May 23, 2013, 08:25:24 AM »
Thank you Norma for putting up those links.  I did happen to read those posts before and again just now and they do help.  I don't think I can make a clone HRI crust b/c I've never had one so I won't be able to base my findings on something to compare to.  I would be happy to make a good tasting flaky Chicago thin type crust.   In one of those links you posted, I agree with Peter, that one of the challenges is to find the right balance between oil and hydration.  To get a dough that looks and behaves like their dough but will also keep the fluted edge during the bake. 
« Last Edit: May 23, 2013, 08:56:36 AM by Jackie Tran »

Offline norma427

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #776 on: May 23, 2013, 09:20:06 AM »
Thank you Norma for putting up those links.  I did happen to read those posts before and again just now and they do help.  I don't think I can make a clone HRI crust b/c I've never had one so I won't be able to base my findings on something to compare to.  I would be happy to make a good tasting flaky Chicago thin type crust.   In one of those links you posted, I agree with Peter, that one of the challenges is to find the right balance between oil and hydration.  To get a dough that looks and behaves like their dough but will also keep the fluted edge during the bake.

Chau,

That is one of the problems I had when trying to make a clone HRI pizza.  Since I never really tasted a HRI pizza right out of the oven at one of their pizzerias I never will know if I made a decent attempt or not.  For me the frozen HRI pizzas really don't have a lot of taste, or aren't that special for me.  I am still interested in trying to make a HRI clone attempt again, but really don't know what to try next. 

Good luck with your experiments.  I know you have done many experiments and are successful many times so I will be watching to see where your experiments lead you.  ;D

Norma
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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #777 on: May 23, 2013, 01:21:29 PM »
Who knows, I may just end up with a dense crust.  ???
Well, I think part of the HRI crust is dense Chau. Although it has these pastry like layers it by no means is light an flaky. The pizza eats rather "heavy" if you will and with so much oil in the crust one feels like they have eaten twice as much as they actually have.
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Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #778 on: May 23, 2013, 01:37:35 PM »
^^i agree.  it's kind of like a very dense and oily phyllo pastry, if you can imagine that.  I actually think it's a kind of bland yet disgusting crust ( :-D), but different strokes, right!     :chef:

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Home Run Inn Success and Final Formulation
« Reply #779 on: May 23, 2013, 02:48:19 PM »
Well hell guys, maybe I'm on the right track!  :-D