Author Topic: Rising-crust pizza recipe  (Read 6118 times)

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Offline Allene

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Rising-crust pizza recipe
« on: January 27, 2008, 01:37:40 PM »
Hello! I'm looking for a recipe for rising-crust pizza dough. I tried to find it by searching the archives but didn't have any luck. Thanks for any help you can give me.  Allene


Offline Jackitup

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Re: Rising-crust pizza recipe
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2008, 01:57:49 PM »
If you're looking for that real poofy kind of crust try using a little more yeast or try some baking powder in your dough. Look thru the 'Thick Style' section on the Home page and something in there should suit you. Lot's of good pics in there to guide your choice.
Jon
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Rising-crust pizza recipe
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2008, 02:00:14 PM »
Allene,

If you are looking for a "bake to rise" formulation, ala DiGiorno's, then you may want to take a look at this: http://www.pmq.com/recipe/view_recipe.php?id=60. There are also bake-to-rise doughs that use chemical leavening systems, but it isn't clear from your post if that is what you are looking for.

Peter
« Last Edit: January 27, 2008, 02:12:12 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Rising-crust pizza recipe
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2008, 02:16:19 PM »
Also, the Sicillian Style and Foaccia Style sections have alot of stuff in the high rising formulations, but as Pete said more specifics would help.
Jon
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Offline Allene

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Re: Rising-crust pizza recipe
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2008, 02:24:58 PM »
Thank you all for your replies. Sorry I wasn't clear enough. I'm referring to something like DiGiorno or Freschetta-style doughs. I am coming back later today to look at all the links you mentioned.  Allene

Offline Allene

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Re: Rising-crust pizza recipe
« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2008, 06:22:20 PM »
I'm back after looking at the Lehmann dough recipe and the Briar Hill Thick Style recipe. The Lehmann recipe leaves me scratching my head. I don't understand the percentages. How does one go about converting them to standard measurements? I can understand the Briar Hill recipe, but neither of these recipes tell me how to bake the dough. I do have a newly purchased pizza stone, and I've read about high heat requirements. I'm not sure how to apply this to a thicker crust, though. I would think thicker crusts would take longer to bake and possibly at a lower heat. Thanks again for any help you can give me.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Rising-crust pizza recipe
« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2008, 07:01:06 PM »
Allene,

Since you posted in the Newbie Topics section, it wasn't entirely clear to me why you were looking for a bake-to-rise dough recipe. Bake-to-rise dough recipes are usually intended for commercial operators who are looking to prepare pizzas that can be refrigerated or frozen and baked in a standard home oven much like a frozen DiGiorno's pizza would be baked, that is, without requiring a pizza stone or anything else like that. Home pizza hobbyists do not normally make bake-to-rise doughs. Also, they don't usually have SALP (sodium aluminum phosphate) on hand to make such doughs. Commercial operators often use a product known as WRISE, which is a combination of SALP and sodium bicarbonate and typically sold in 50-lb. bags. If you have SALP and baking soda or WRISE on hand, I am sure that I can convert the Lehmann dough formulation into whatever number and weights of dough balls (or corresponding pizza sizes) you would like. But unless you are planning to become a frozen bake-to-rise pizza manufacturer, you may want to revisit what it is that you are trying to do. If you are a newbie, there are far better pizzas to be made without using chemical leavening systems such as used in the Lehmann dough formulation I referenced.

Peter

Offline Allene

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Re: Rising-crust pizza recipe
« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2008, 07:14:46 PM »
Pete,

My original question was a reflection of my ignorance.   :) I have never made pizza dough before, although I've made other types of doughs for years. I have no plans to start a pizza business,   ;D and I never heard of SALP before, but I'd like to find a good thick-crust pizza recipe that's not as heavy or deep as a Chicago-style pizza. The Briar Hill recipe is probably more like what I'm looking for. I guess I should just go to the library and get a pizza recipe book. I bought the pizza stone for other things besides pizza baking, so even if I never use it for pizza, it won't go to waste. Allene


 

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