Author Topic: Ultragrain  (Read 27307 times)

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Offline November

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Ultragrain
« on: February 21, 2008, 01:10:46 PM »
Ultragrain is a ConAgra Foods product intended to provide the nutrition of whole grain flour with the taste and texture of processed white wheat flour.  More information can be found at ConAgra Food's Ultragrain website: http://www.ultragrain.com/

I wondered how well a flour of this kind would work for making a pizza crust, comparing it against traditional whole wheat and white wheat flour based crusts.  The flour I used was Eagle Mills All-Purpose flour which can probably be found at most supermarkets now.  The dough formula was as follows:

100.0 Eagle Mills All-Purpose flour
64.72 water
2.236 honey
1.732 kosher salt
1.414 soybean oil
000.3 ADY

The fermentation schedule was as follows:

1) 3 h @ 86F (bulk)
2) 2 h @ 68F (divided)
3) 1 h @ 68F (sheeted).

The dough ball weight for a single 14" pizza was 490 g.  My analysis is that this flour is an excellent replacement for traditional whole wheat flour, but it still lacks the more favorable flavor that comes from using bread or high-gluten flour.  I would describe the flavor as similar to a mixture of traditional all-purpose and traditional whole wheat.  The Ultragrain flour did have comparable gluten strength to something found between a bread and high-gluten flour.  The texture of the baked crust was probably the best of its qualities.  I found the interior of the rim to be much more pillowy than what can be achieved with a traditional whole grain flour.  I'm not sure if that is enough to compel me to use this flour for pizzas on a regular basis, but it is good enough for me to say I will probably never use traditional whole wheat flour again in a pizza crust as long as this flour is available.  I highly recommend this flour for anyone who is already committed to using whole grains on a regular basis for their pizza crust.

- red.november


Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2008, 05:28:34 PM »
For the curious that haven't asked yet, the pizza was baked on a perforated pan at 600F for about 4 minutes.

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2008, 05:40:38 PM »
I responded to the other thread you linked from on whole wheat flour. I'm curious if the flavor profile would be inhanced with a longer proof in the fridge or a 24 hour counter top proof, also, how a cracker crust would perform using this. I have to go to the store for a few things and will check to see if they have any to try out.
Thanks again for the info.
Jon
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Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2008, 08:21:12 AM »
Jon,

It would be a matter of preference as to whether a cold fermentation would improve the flavor, but in general a longer fermentation almost always improves the flavor.  Given how well the outside of the crust crisps I think this flour is well suited for a cracker crust, or even a deep dish crust.  This flour is the first I have encountered that I would truly call "all-purpose."  For the past several weeks I have used it for cakes and cookies with great success; I already knew it would do well for making bread; and now I think it works well as a pizza crust flour.  It has already replaced traditional all-purpose flour in my pantry, and I can't think of a good reason why it shouldn't replace traditional whole wheat flour for any recipe that calls for it.

- red.november

Offline charbo

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2008, 12:58:38 PM »
I haven't been able to find this flour in a store yet.  The bag photos indicate 9 grams of whole grain per serving.  I guess that means it's a 30% blend of whole wheat and refined wheat.  Would like to find 100% ultragrain.


Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2008, 01:35:16 PM »
Yes, according to the resource I linked to:

"Ultragrain can also be found in Eagle Mills All-Purpose Flour, a blend of 30% Ultragrain and 70% premium white flour, which can be used as a direct replacement for white or bread flour in any recipe, making already delicious recipes more nutritious. Eagle Mills All-Purpose Flour offers 9 grams of whole grains per cup serving."

I'm not sure if there would be much benefit to using 100% Ultragrain.  At 30% it provides most of the nutrition of 100% whole wheat flour, but with much less "whole graininess."  Keep in mind the principle comparison.  King Arthur's White Whole Wheat flour contains 3g of fiber and 4g of protein per 1/4 cup serving, while Eagle Mills All-Purpose flour contains 2g of fiber and 4g of protein.  Obviously those numbers are crude, but it shows a notable increase in fiber and protein over bread flour (1g of fiber and 3g of protein).  Flour mills like Eagle Mills might in fact be using a graham flour (milled using the Graham process) base rather than a standard processed white flour base to achieve more of the physical characteristics of white flour and nutrition of whole wheat flour.  I don't know if graham flour can be advertised as whole grain flour in the United States.  The ingredients only state: Unbleached Flour (Wheat Flour and Ultragrain Whole Wheat Flour).  "Wheat Flour" could mean several different things.

- red.november
« Last Edit: February 22, 2008, 01:37:00 PM by November »

Offline November

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Eagle Mills All-Purpose / King Arthur Bread - Flour Blend
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2008, 08:00:01 PM »
I decided to try a few things to improve the flavor (not that the flavor was bad, but it was still very "whole-grain" tasting) and see what a blend with bread flour would produce.  I was very impressed with the results.  The flavor was much closer to what is typical of pure bread or high-gluten flour based crusts.  Due to the increase in sugar from additional honey, and the addition of malted milk powder, the texture wandered a bit into bread territory, but was still far above average if comparing against chain restaurant fare.  The following was the dough formula used:

 100   50% Eagle Mills All-Purpose, 50% King Arthur Bread
64.3   water
2.50   honey
2.00   malted milk powder
1.75   kosher salt
1.00   soybean oil
0.30   ADY

The fermentation schedule was the same as the last.  The baking temperature was hovering just above 600F and each pizza finished baking in about 3.5 minutes.

Offline scott r

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2008, 04:42:18 PM »
November, Beautiful pizza!
I am curious about your fermentation schedule.  From reading your posts I know that you leave no stone unturned when it comes to your endeavors.  I am wondering how much volume increase you get in this amount of time.  I would also love to know why you would prefer this short rise time over a longer slower rise. I am assuming it is at least partially because of the increase in enzymatic activity that you get with the elevated yeast levels.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2008, 05:34:15 PM by scott r »

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2008, 04:44:42 PM »
November, Beautiful pizza!


Thank you.  I'm hoping today's pizza will be even better.  I'm using turbinado sugar, which I prefer over honey any day, and a 50/50 flour blend with the formula in the initial post.

I am wondering how much volume increase you get in this amount of time.


About 200% (100% increase) during the bulk rise, and an additional 150% (50% increase) during the divided rise.

I would also love to know why you would prefer this short rise time over a longer slower rise. I am assuming it is at least partially because of the increase in enzymatic activity that you get with the elevated yeast levels.


I've discussed this before, but I'm not sure where all the places are that I did.  Here's one place: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4517.msg48023.html#msg48023

I also created a chart about 9 months ago that illustrates where the sweet spot is for a combination (blue line) of enzymatic action under the influence of artificially high acid production (red line) and yeast productivity (green line): http://www.unclesalmon.com/lib/images/graphs/sweet_spot.png  You can see that the apex of the combination is right around 40C (104F).  Determined through experimentation, under normal acid production (not shown) the sweet spot is closer to 30C (86F).

It's also a very convenient schedule to follow, and I have been using it consistently for a while now to judge the differences between dough formulas.  It's simple and it allows me the opportunity to see the dough perform in a bulk stage, divided stage, a warm stage, and a room-temperature stage.  That much variation in the schedule gives me a lot to compare dough formulas with.

- red.november
« Last Edit: February 27, 2008, 04:51:41 PM by November »

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2008, 08:20:15 PM »
100.0 50% Eagle Mills All-Purpose, 50% King Arthur Bread
64.72 water
1.732 sea salt
1.414 turbinado sugar
1.414 soybean oil
0.300 ADY

I was pleased with the flavor and the texture.  This blend could have easily gone more in the Ultragrain direction without compromising good flavor.  I'll probably make one more 50/50 crust but with malted brown rice syrup as a sweetener before increasing the Eagle Mills All-Purpose proportion to two-thirds.

EDIT: I almost forgot I went with the sea salt for this one.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2008, 08:26:39 PM by November »


Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2008, 08:10:33 PM »
This is the last 50/50 blend I anticipate reporting on.  This formula includes my preferred sweetener, malted brown rice syrup (MBRS).  Since MBRS is not as sweet as sucrose, and because it obviously contains water, the amount is adjusted accordingly (higher than sucrose or honey).  Future blends and 100% formulas will probably include MBRS just because I favor the resulting flavor.

100.0 50% Eagle Mills All-Purpose, 50% King Arthur Bread
64.72 water
2.739 malted brown rice syrup
1.732 kosher salt
1.414 soybean oil
0.300 ADY

As already eluded to, the flavor resulting from using MBRS is my favorite, so it didn't surprise me that I liked this crust the best of the blends tested so far.

- red.november
« Last Edit: March 03, 2008, 08:26:32 PM by November »

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2008, 08:08:50 PM »
I decided to extend the usage of my ingredient and process preferences by using rice bran oil for the lipid, and add a preferment stage to the process.

100.0   Eagle Mills All-Purpose flour
66.00   water
2.828   malted brown rice syrup
1.732   kosher salt
1.414   rice bran oil
0.150   ADY

Only 50% of the flour was used at the start to form a quasi-poolish.  This quasi-poolish fermented for six (6) hours at 68F.  Then the rest of the flour was added and the schedule outlined in the first post was followed for a grand total of twelve (12) hours.

My conclusion is that this crust was among the best I've had out of all crusts, including ones made with 100% bread flour or 100% high-gluten flour.  The combination of increasing the hydration, using MBRS and rice bran oil, and a six-hour preferment really made an incredible difference.  The dough handled almost identically to a high-gluten flour based dough.  The additional acids produced during the preferment stage really helped to break down the bran and create a super soft crumb while canceling out all but a tiny bit of the "whole-wheat-like" flavor.  This shouldn't come as any major surprise, but it's worth mentioning for those who would not normally consider a preferment.  I know that I typically wouldn't because of time constraints, however it may be worth the trouble in this case.  I could see myself making this crust on a regular basis with results like these.  Without the changes in this post from the first post in this thread, I wouldn't bother with it for frequent consumption.

- red.november

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2008, 08:33:52 PM »
Thanks for the update. I haven't tried this flour on a pizza crust yet, maybe this weekend. I found some at the local Coborns Grocery and made some bread from it a week ago and was less than impressed with the outcome. Would have been better with some high glutin flour mixed in due to it turning out a bit flat and not much rise, very little glutin developement even though I beat and kneaded the devil out of it, including starting a preferment the day before. But on the other hand your crusts look fantastic. I think this flour is more suited to pizza. I'll let you know how it turns out when I make one.
Jon
Save A Cow, Eat A Vegan....Totally Organic And Hormone Free!!

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #13 on: March 05, 2008, 08:43:59 PM »
Jon,

I'm surprised that you had complications with gluten development.  I actually have to be careful not to knead the dough too much otherwise the gluten bonds become so strong, it's difficult to stretch.  As I mentioned before, without the preferment the "100%" dough handled with gluten strength between a bread flour dough and a high-gluten flour dough.  With the preferment it handled like a high-gluten flour dough.  I can't ask for better than that.  I look forward to a report of your experience.

- red.november

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #14 on: March 09, 2008, 08:42:57 PM »
I found some at the local Coborns Grocery and made some bread from it a week ago and was less than impressed with the outcome. Would have been better with some high glutin flour mixed in due to it turning out a bit flat


RE: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,528.msg54696.html#msg54696

Not only was I impressed with the rise, I had to flatten it a bit before putting it in the oven so that when I went to apply peanut butter and jelly, it wouldn't seep through any large holes.  If I had left the dough alone before baking it, it would have had outrageous voids.

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #15 on: March 14, 2008, 12:53:07 AM »
100.0   (66.67%) Eagle Mills All-Purpose flour, (33.33%) King Arthur Bread flour
66.67   water
2.828   malted brown rice syrup
1.732   kosher salt
1.414   turbinado sugar
1.414   rice bran oil
0.225   ADY

All of the Eagle Mills flour, all of the water, the sugar, and the yeast were mixed together to form a preferment.  The preferment was kept at 86F for 3 hours before adding the rest of the ingredients and following the fermentation schedule used in the first post of this thread.  Of this crust's characteristics, the flavor was the best.

- red.november

Offline DWChun

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #16 on: March 14, 2008, 01:22:52 PM »
Thank you for bringing Ultragrain to our attention, November.

I incorporate whole grain into my pizza dough usually so I'm definitely going to try it out when I can get a hold of some Ultragrain.


DW

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #17 on: March 14, 2008, 04:03:52 PM »
Thank you for bringing Ultragrain to our attention, November.


I did not bring Ultragrain to the attention of this forum.  It was already discussed here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2454.0.html

Offline DWChun

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #18 on: March 15, 2008, 12:01:35 AM »
I did not bring Ultragrain to the attention of this forum.  It was already discussed here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,2454.0.html


Oh wow, I wish I read that thread sooner. Better late than never!

Offline November

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New Fermentation
« Reply #19 on: March 19, 2008, 07:42:06 PM »
I went back to 50/50 for this one because I wanted to try out a different fermentation schedule rather than a different blend.  The next time I use this schedule it will probably be with 100% Eagle Mills All-Purpose flour.

100.0   (50%) Eagle Mills All-Purpose flour, (50%) King Arthur Bread flour
66.67   water
2.828   malted brown rice syrup
1.732   kosher salt
1.414   rice bran oil
0.600   ADY

1) 3 h @ 86F (preferment)
2) 1 h @ 86F (bulk)
3) 1 h @ 68F (divided)
4) 1 h @ 68F (sheeted)

The preferment consisted of all the Eagle Mills flour, all the water, all the malted brown rice syrup, and all the ADY.  The additional ADY and the use of a preferment certainly maximized the flavor; and when I say maximized, I mean I wouldn't want any more.  It was characteristic of a very long room temperature rise.

- red.november