Author Topic: Ultragrain  (Read 31603 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #25 on: March 20, 2008, 01:19:53 PM »
1004 + 3/4 cupsEagle Mills All-Purpose flour
66.81 + 1/3 + 1/4 cupswater

November,

Do you have a recommended way for measuring out the flour and water by volume?

Peter


Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #26 on: March 20, 2008, 06:07:18 PM »
Do you have a recommended way for measuring out the flour and water by volume?

Same as usual: Stir, scoop, and level for the flour; and observe the bottom of the meniscus for measuring water in a glass measuring cup or just use individual (e.g. plastic, metal, etc.) measuring cups.

Offline November

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Volumetric Formula Results
« Reply #27 on: March 24, 2008, 07:56:50 PM »
As previously noted, this formula is optimized for volume measurements and common ingredients.  If following the volumetric amounts listed, this is for making two (2) 14" pizzas.  The flavor was great, and it was very crispy on the surface.  If I had to change anything it would be to underknead it.  With that much protein, and with that much preferment time and yeast, it takes far less kneading than usual.  I think this particular fermentation schedule works best if 50% of the flour is a bread flour or a flour with a lower amount of protein.

Dough Formula
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6290.msg55090.html#msg55090

Fermentation Schedule
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6290.msg55074.html#msg55074
[Note: Half of the flour was used in the preferment.]

(The toppings were turkey pepperoni and pineapple.)

- red.november

Offline pizzoid

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #28 on: April 01, 2008, 01:44:15 PM »
For anyone who has been looking, my local Shaw's in SE Massachusetts appears to have just put the Eagle Mills 30/70 mix on the shelves this week.

- pizzoid

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #29 on: May 12, 2008, 08:23:26 PM »
I wasn't planning on reporting on another 50/50 blend, but I have changed the formula a bit, and the results have been consistently good.  The slight change-up in ingredient percentages was in order to give the crust a better balance in sweetness.  For fun I started with getting the various sugars (sucrose, glucose, fructose, and lactose/maltose) closer together in quantity.  I also used 40% potassium chloride for the salt because of the recent discussion on the subject of this salt.

 100   50% Eagle Mills All-Purpose, 50% King Arthur Bread
65.0   water
2.00   honey
1.75   60% kosher salt, 40% potassium chloride
1.50   malted milk powder
1.25   soybean oil
1.00   turbinado sugar
0.30   ADY

- red.november

Offline November

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Ultragrain, Brown Rice & Soy
« Reply #30 on: May 26, 2008, 08:00:10 PM »
 100   88% Eagle Mills All-Purpose flour
     :   8% Bob's Red Mill Brown Rice flour
     :   4% Arrowhead Mills Soy flour
66.9   water
2.00   turbinado sugar
1.82   kosher salt
0.30   ADY


Offline 2stone

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #31 on: May 26, 2008, 11:41:33 PM »
November,

Beautiful pies.....stunning ......did they taste as good as they look?

willard

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #32 on: May 27, 2008, 07:01:03 AM »
Willard,

Thank you.  [I just extracted a leftover slice from the refrigerator to consume as I compose this.]  The crust was very good.  I used the brown rice flour and soy flour to "scrub" the whole-wheat-grainy flavor and to balance out a few of other characteristics.  For instance, rather than adding oil in this formula, I relied on the lecithin and fat from the soy flour to achieve the texture I wanted.  Also while not having as much gluten, making the dough easier to work with for a dough containing whole grain, the overall amount of protein was raised a bit with the soy flour, contributing to good browning.  The gluten-containing wheat source of protein came to around 11.7%, while the overall protein content was about 13.7%.  Those percentages were intentionally meant to surround the 12.7% of King Arthur's bread flour.

- red.november

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #33 on: June 03, 2008, 07:12:28 PM »
Papa John's recently introduced a new whole-wheat pizza in all of its stores. According to this website, http://www.kinyradio.com/healthman.html, one of the crust ingredients is Ultragrain. The ingredients list appears to have been garbled (it looks like they put the pizza sauce in the middle of the crust ingredients), but I believe that the proper listing for the new whole-wheat crust is as follows:

Ultragrain Hard White Wheat Flour, water, coarse whole-wheat flour, sugar, soybean oil, salt, wheat gluten, vanilla extract, baker's yeast.

For further confirmation, see also http://www.vrg.org/vrgnews/2008sep.htm and http://www.kval.com/news/health/19402444.html.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 23, 2009, 12:19:30 PM by Pete-zza »


Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #34 on: June 06, 2008, 09:03:17 PM »
A different formula using VWG and raw agave nectar:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6747.msg58166.html#msg58166

Offline November

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Ultragrain - Twisted
« Reply #35 on: June 18, 2008, 10:01:50 PM »
With this batch I attempted to diversify this dough's portfolio.  Although this post could just as easily reside in the "Other Types" board, the deal maker was the Eagle Mills All-Purpose flour with Ultragrain.  With a single batch I made naan, parmesan cheese sticks, cinnamon rolls, and a soft pretzel.  The naan was okay.  The parmesan cheese sticks were good.  The cinnamon rolls were really good.  The soft pretzel was the best soft pretzel I have ever eaten in my life.  I have had numerous soft pretzels in my day, including those served by street venders in New York and Philadelphia as well as from skating rinks and sports stadiums from my youth, but I really do think there was something special going on here.  I can't adequately describe just how happy I was eating this pretzel.  If I hadn't already dumped my alkaline water, I would have discarded any notion of making naan, sticks, or rolls with the remaining dough.  For a moment I even considered never making pizza again and just making pretzels henceforth.  It was just a moment though.  (It must have been the alkalinity messing with my mind.)  I was too anxious to sample the goods to stop and take pictures, but here's the schedule and formula:

4.0 hours @ 86°F (preferment)
1.5 hours @ 86°F (bulk)
1.0 hours @ 72°F (divided)
0.5 hours @ 72°F (shaped)

100.0   : 48.7% Eagle Mills All-Purpose
... ...   : 48.7% King Arthur Bread
... ...   : 2.6% Hodgson Mill VWG
62.00   water
03.50   raw agave nectar (2.5 dry)
01.75   sea salt
01.00   malted milk
01.00   rice bran oil
00.33   ADY

The formed pretzel was boiled for about 45 seconds in alkaline water (95% water, 5% sodium bicarbonate), coarse sea salt was sprinkled atop, and finally baked directly on the rack in a 600°F oven for just under 6 minutes.

The Ultragrain based flour really added just the right flavor and texture to make the pretzel stand out.  I could detect a small symphony playing in the background with the nectar and malted milk, but ultimately I think it was how the flour boiled and baked that made the biggest difference.

- red.november

Offline Pizza_Not_War

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #36 on: June 19, 2008, 11:07:11 AM »
red.november,

Pretzels sound great. Can't wait to try them.

I have been unable to locate Ultragrain locally. Where are you buying it?

Also, what kind of indoor oven do you use that is giving you 600 degrees?

TIA


PNW

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #37 on: June 19, 2008, 12:28:00 PM »
I have been unable to locate Ultragrain locally. Where are you buying it?

The flour I buy is Eagle Mills All-Purpose.  I can get it ay any supermarket in town.  I normally shop at Publix as they have a large organic selection and they're just two blocks away.

Also, what kind of indoor oven do you use that is giving you 600 degrees?

Mine.  ;)  It actually goes higher than 600°F, but the insulation around the oven isn't meant to take on more than around 525°F, so I try not to push it too much.  As it is, the surrounding cabinets approach 200°F when the oven is on at 600°F.  And no, it is not a modified self-cleaning oven, nor is it an oven that can be purchased anymore.  It was originally manufactured by General Electric.

- red.november

Offline Pizza_Not_War

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #38 on: June 24, 2008, 10:14:07 PM »
The flour I buy is Eagle Mills All-Purpose.  I can get it ay any supermarket in town.  I normally shop at Publix as they have a large organic selection and they're just two blocks away.

I received a reply from Con Agra today - I consider it to be "a hoot": As if I did not already attempt that! Duh!!
Anyway for anyone else trying to find the product, here it is.

Thank you for your inquiry.  We are always pleased to hear from our consumers but are sorry to learn that you have experienced difficulty locating our Eagle Mills® All-Purpose Unbleached Flour.

In the future you may want to use our online product locator to find ConAgra Foods products. You can access it at:
www.conagrafoods.com/consumer/storelocator/search.jsp?ftr=true. However, the product you are looking for is not on this product locator.  You may find the Eagle Mills® All-Purpose Unbleached Flour at the following stores around the country (you might also try asking your local grocer to special order it for you):

Eagle Mills Flour - Availability

Hy-Vee
Super Valu Northern Region
Meijers
Associated Wholesale Grocers
Albertson's
Winn Dixie   Are these guys still in business?
Publix
Byerly's
Lunds
Coburns
Cubs
Jewel
Dallas
Schnucks
Sentry
Dierbergs
Acme
United Supermarkets
Price Choppers

We appreciate the time you have taken to contact us and your interest in our products.  We hope this information is helpful in selecting our fine products in the future.


Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #39 on: June 24, 2008, 10:45:16 PM »
Albertson's
Winn Dixie   Are these guys still in business?
Publix

The three quoted above are the main stores around here where I live.

Offline Pizza_Not_War

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #40 on: June 24, 2008, 11:42:21 PM »
The three quoted above are the main stores around here where I live.

I used to live in Sarasota and Publix was always crowded, Albertsons & Winn Dixie split the other 5 customers between them. I never could figure out how they survived. Now I am in Oregon and Albertsons seems to have 6 customers here, I don't understand why they still exist. And as I recall Winn Dixie was going BK in 2005, I just was curious if they still were around.

Albertsons of Portland, Oregon does not know Ultragrain. Maybe it has not hit the West Coast.

PNW

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #41 on: September 08, 2008, 02:03:26 PM »
Ultragrain Hard White Wheat Flour, water, coarse whole-wheat flour, sugar, soybean oil, salt, wheat gluten, vanilla extract, baker's yeast.

Peter,

The vanilla extract in the list of ingredients for Papa John's whole wheat pizza intrigued me, and I've been thinking about it every since you posted the list.  Over the past couple of weeks I have been making a dough with the following formula:

100   598.0 g   4.6667 c      King Arthur bread flour
63   377.0 g   1.5 c, 1.5 T      water
3.5   21.00 g   3 T         malted milk, powder
1.84   11.00 g   2 t         sea salt

I have been referring to it jokingly as "The Maltese Dough" (not to be confused with dough made in Malta) since it's being "teased" with malted milk and doesn't get any of the usual sugar or oil.  The fat and soy lecithin in the malted milk suffice as primitive oil stand-ins.

Today I decided to make it a vanilla malted milkshake dough.  I figured there wouldn't be a better time to try out vanilla in dough than with malted milk as the only other additive.  To the above I added a whole teaspoon of vanilla extract.  The results of combining malted milk and vanilla extract were predictable.  It smelled a little like a barley milkshake.  However, once I added the yeast it took on a completely different form of fragrance.  It was like a sweetened, intense version of yeast aroma.  After combining all the ingredients and kneading the dough for about seven minutes, it started to take on an intense bread aroma, almost as if the dough had already partially baked.

Vanillin is typically used in baking to heighten the flavor (olfaction and gustation) intensity of sweet goods, but in the case where there is little perceived sweetness, it simply intensifies whatever flavor is there.  There is a slight sweetening effect even in the absence of additional sugar, but in the presence of so much flour, bread is the overwhelming sensory perception.  This dough I made earlier will be baked later tonight.

- red.november


Offline BBQhunter

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #42 on: November 01, 2008, 08:10:24 PM »
Does anyone know what supermarket chains carry the Eagle Mills All Purpose white flour with Ultragrain ? Their web site is poorly designed and I can't seem to find the answer to that question.  Where are you people buying it ?

Offline Kookoutside

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #43 on: March 15, 2009, 09:32:13 AM »
November,

Are you proofing the yeast in this recipe or adding it dry?  I scaled it up to 800 grams of flour and that resulted in 12 grams of yeast.  Seems like a lot. Final product came out quite good but the coronas (crust edges) were a bit puffy for my taste.  Seems like using less yeast, or not proofing first might fix that.
Thanks
« Last Edit: March 15, 2009, 02:34:51 PM by Kookoutside »

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #44 on: March 15, 2009, 11:30:06 AM »
Is the yeast being proffed in this recipe?  I scaled it up to 800 grams of flour and that resulted in 12 grams of yeast.  Seems like a lot.
Thanks

There are 11 dough formulas in this thread specifying a yeast amount.  None of them scale to 800 g of flour and 12 g of yeast.  What dough formula are you looking at and what math are you using to scale it?  All the yeast listed here so far has been ADY, so yes, in accordance with recommended practices, the ADY is being proofed in water before being added to the flour.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2009, 11:38:48 AM by November »

Offline Kookoutside

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #45 on: March 15, 2009, 02:48:03 PM »
November,

Thanks for your reply.  I just realized I skipped a decimal.  For 800 grams flour I should have used 1.2 grams ADY, not 12.  No wonder the crust edges got so puffy.  Other than that the dough came out pretty good.  I just finished cooking 8 9"ers.  I used your recipe that calls for 1.414 rice bran oil and 0.150 ADY.

kookoutside

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #46 on: April 02, 2009, 06:40:10 PM »
For those who are interested, according to an article (see below) that I recently read at bakingbusiness.com, Ultragrain Whole Wheat Flour is scheduled to appear on some supermarket shelves this spring:

Ultragrain Whole Wheat Flour to appear at retail

(Bakingbusiness.com, April 02, 2009)
by Jeff Gelski 

OMAHA — ConAgra Foods, Inc. will make Eagle Mills 100% Ultragrain White Whole Wheat Flour available at select grocery stores nationwide starting this spring. The flour’s taste, appearance and texture are similar to that of refined white flours, and the flour offers the same nutrition as 100% whole wheat, according to the company.

"Most Americans aren’t willing to sacrifice taste, appearance and flavor to get whole grain nutrition," said Phil Lempert, a food trends editor known as the "Supermarket Guru." "Today’s consumers want whole grain products to taste as good as the refined white flour products they know and love, and Ultragrain White Whole Wheat Flour is a perfect balance of what consumers need and want."

Ultragrain flour delivers 30 grams of whole grains per serving and 4.5 times the amount of fiber as refined white flours. It performs well when blended with refined flour. Consumers may use the Eagle Mills 100% Ultragrain White Whole Wheat Flour wheat flour to replace a portion of their refined flour in recipes ranging from cookies, biscuits and rolls to baked or fried chicken. Eagle Mills 100% Ultragrain White Whole Wheat Flour has a suggested retail price of $3.69 to $3.99 for a 5-lb bag.

ConAgra Mills already makes Ultragrain available to food manufacturers and food service operators.

"We have seen the success that food manufacturers and schools have had in changing their recipes to include whole grains using Ultragrain," said Mike Veal, vice-president of marketing for Omaha-based ConAgra Mills. "This retail package of Ultragrain is huge in that consumers can now add Ultragrain to their family recipes and increase the whole grain nutrition in the meals that their families already love."

Also at the retail level, Eagle Mills all-purpose flour that has 30% Ultragrain and 70% refined flour is available. It has 9 grams of whole grains per serving and works as a cup-for-cup replacement to other all-purpose flours. The suggested retail price is $2.99 to $3.49 for a 5-lb bag.


Peter

Offline jagercola

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #47 on: April 06, 2009, 10:35:48 PM »
Just saw the 100% ultragrain on special as a new item at my local Ingles.  This comes a day after I ordered a 50# bag of Wheat Montana's Prairie Gold (White Wheat) from a local health store.  Oh well, I got a 50# bag of Wheat Montana's hi-gluten white to go with it!

Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #48 on: November 16, 2010, 08:28:13 AM »
Hey November!

I hope you're still reading this!

I recently purchased 20lbs of this stuff from Costco as it was cheap, not always the best reason but I have it now...

I was just wondering what the purpose of Soy Bean oil was in your initial post?

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #49 on: November 16, 2010, 02:26:21 PM »
I was just wondering what the purpose of Soy Bean oil was in your initial post?

The same general purpose as adding any oil to dough, or were you wondering why oil is added to dough at all?


 

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