Author Topic: Ultragrain  (Read 27435 times)

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Offline Pizza_Not_War

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #40 on: June 24, 2008, 11:42:21 PM »
The three quoted above are the main stores around here where I live.

I used to live in Sarasota and Publix was always crowded, Albertsons & Winn Dixie split the other 5 customers between them. I never could figure out how they survived. Now I am in Oregon and Albertsons seems to have 6 customers here, I don't understand why they still exist. And as I recall Winn Dixie was going BK in 2005, I just was curious if they still were around.

Albertsons of Portland, Oregon does not know Ultragrain. Maybe it has not hit the West Coast.

PNW


Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #41 on: September 08, 2008, 02:03:26 PM »
Ultragrain Hard White Wheat Flour, water, coarse whole-wheat flour, sugar, soybean oil, salt, wheat gluten, vanilla extract, baker's yeast.

Peter,

The vanilla extract in the list of ingredients for Papa John's whole wheat pizza intrigued me, and I've been thinking about it every since you posted the list.  Over the past couple of weeks I have been making a dough with the following formula:

100   598.0 g   4.6667 c      King Arthur bread flour
63   377.0 g   1.5 c, 1.5 T      water
3.5   21.00 g   3 T         malted milk, powder
1.84   11.00 g   2 t         sea salt

I have been referring to it jokingly as "The Maltese Dough" (not to be confused with dough made in Malta) since it's being "teased" with malted milk and doesn't get any of the usual sugar or oil.  The fat and soy lecithin in the malted milk suffice as primitive oil stand-ins.

Today I decided to make it a vanilla malted milkshake dough.  I figured there wouldn't be a better time to try out vanilla in dough than with malted milk as the only other additive.  To the above I added a whole teaspoon of vanilla extract.  The results of combining malted milk and vanilla extract were predictable.  It smelled a little like a barley milkshake.  However, once I added the yeast it took on a completely different form of fragrance.  It was like a sweetened, intense version of yeast aroma.  After combining all the ingredients and kneading the dough for about seven minutes, it started to take on an intense bread aroma, almost as if the dough had already partially baked.

Vanillin is typically used in baking to heighten the flavor (olfaction and gustation) intensity of sweet goods, but in the case where there is little perceived sweetness, it simply intensifies whatever flavor is there.  There is a slight sweetening effect even in the absence of additional sugar, but in the presence of so much flour, bread is the overwhelming sensory perception.  This dough I made earlier will be baked later tonight.

- red.november

Offline BBQhunter

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #42 on: November 01, 2008, 08:10:24 PM »
Does anyone know what supermarket chains carry the Eagle Mills All Purpose white flour with Ultragrain ? Their web site is poorly designed and I can't seem to find the answer to that question.  Where are you people buying it ?

Offline Kookoutside

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #43 on: March 15, 2009, 09:32:13 AM »
November,

Are you proofing the yeast in this recipe or adding it dry?  I scaled it up to 800 grams of flour and that resulted in 12 grams of yeast.  Seems like a lot. Final product came out quite good but the coronas (crust edges) were a bit puffy for my taste.  Seems like using less yeast, or not proofing first might fix that.
Thanks
« Last Edit: March 15, 2009, 02:34:51 PM by Kookoutside »

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #44 on: March 15, 2009, 11:30:06 AM »
Is the yeast being proffed in this recipe?  I scaled it up to 800 grams of flour and that resulted in 12 grams of yeast.  Seems like a lot.
Thanks

There are 11 dough formulas in this thread specifying a yeast amount.  None of them scale to 800 g of flour and 12 g of yeast.  What dough formula are you looking at and what math are you using to scale it?  All the yeast listed here so far has been ADY, so yes, in accordance with recommended practices, the ADY is being proofed in water before being added to the flour.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2009, 11:38:48 AM by November »

Offline Kookoutside

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #45 on: March 15, 2009, 02:48:03 PM »
November,

Thanks for your reply.  I just realized I skipped a decimal.  For 800 grams flour I should have used 1.2 grams ADY, not 12.  No wonder the crust edges got so puffy.  Other than that the dough came out pretty good.  I just finished cooking 8 9"ers.  I used your recipe that calls for 1.414 rice bran oil and 0.150 ADY.

kookoutside

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #46 on: April 02, 2009, 06:40:10 PM »
For those who are interested, according to an article (see below) that I recently read at bakingbusiness.com, Ultragrain Whole Wheat Flour is scheduled to appear on some supermarket shelves this spring:

Ultragrain Whole Wheat Flour to appear at retail

(Bakingbusiness.com, April 02, 2009)
by Jeff Gelski 

OMAHA ó ConAgra Foods, Inc. will make Eagle Mills 100% Ultragrain White Whole Wheat Flour available at select grocery stores nationwide starting this spring. The flourís taste, appearance and texture are similar to that of refined white flours, and the flour offers the same nutrition as 100% whole wheat, according to the company.

"Most Americans arenít willing to sacrifice taste, appearance and flavor to get whole grain nutrition," said Phil Lempert, a food trends editor known as the "Supermarket Guru." "Todayís consumers want whole grain products to taste as good as the refined white flour products they know and love, and Ultragrain White Whole Wheat Flour is a perfect balance of what consumers need and want."

Ultragrain flour delivers 30 grams of whole grains per serving and 4.5 times the amount of fiber as refined white flours. It performs well when blended with refined flour. Consumers may use the Eagle Mills 100% Ultragrain White Whole Wheat Flour wheat flour to replace a portion of their refined flour in recipes ranging from cookies, biscuits and rolls to baked or fried chicken. Eagle Mills 100% Ultragrain White Whole Wheat Flour has a suggested retail price of $3.69 to $3.99 for a 5-lb bag.

ConAgra Mills already makes Ultragrain available to food manufacturers and food service operators.

"We have seen the success that food manufacturers and schools have had in changing their recipes to include whole grains using Ultragrain," said Mike Veal, vice-president of marketing for Omaha-based ConAgra Mills. "This retail package of Ultragrain is huge in that consumers can now add Ultragrain to their family recipes and increase the whole grain nutrition in the meals that their families already love."

Also at the retail level, Eagle Mills all-purpose flour that has 30% Ultragrain and 70% refined flour is available. It has 9 grams of whole grains per serving and works as a cup-for-cup replacement to other all-purpose flours. The suggested retail price is $2.99 to $3.49 for a 5-lb bag.


Peter

Offline jagercola

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #47 on: April 06, 2009, 10:35:48 PM »
Just saw the 100% ultragrain on special as a new item at my local Ingles.  This comes a day after I ordered a 50# bag of Wheat Montana's Prairie Gold (White Wheat) from a local health store.  Oh well, I got a 50# bag of Wheat Montana's hi-gluten white to go with it!

Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #48 on: November 16, 2010, 08:28:13 AM »
Hey November!

I hope you're still reading this!

I recently purchased 20lbs of this stuff from Costco as it was cheap, not always the best reason but I have it now...

I was just wondering what the purpose of Soy Bean oil was in your initial post?

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #49 on: November 16, 2010, 02:26:21 PM »
I was just wondering what the purpose of Soy Bean oil was in your initial post?

The same general purpose as adding any oil to dough, or were you wondering why oil is added to dough at all?


Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #50 on: November 16, 2010, 03:00:21 PM »
I was wondering why Soy, I've never used Soy Oil personally and was wondering if it helped with this particular flour!  I normally don't go beyond Flour, Water, Salt and Yeast for my dough (unless its deep dish)

I'm having a hard time getting an open crumb from this flour. 

I'm breaking down your formula on the first page at the moment. But was waiting on the Soy Oil response :)

« Last Edit: November 16, 2010, 03:02:54 PM by Mick.Chicago »

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #51 on: November 16, 2010, 07:20:07 PM »
I was wondering why Soy, I've never used Soy Oil personally

That's unusual as soybean oil is by far the most common vegetable oil in the world.  In fact, in the United States vegetable oil is synonymous with soybean oil.

Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #52 on: November 16, 2010, 07:56:57 PM »
Sunflower oil is the most common oil were I'm from.

I've never purchased "Vegetable Oil" only, Olive, Corn, and canola. 

Anyway, I used your percentage on the first page and used OO instead, I didn't follow the same method as I couldn't make pie tonight but if I get bad results I will follow your method to the T apart from Soy Bean oil.

Also tried the UltraGrain in some cookie dough and it turned out OK, it needed more sugar than normal to get a nice flavor but it didn't taste healthy  :-\

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #53 on: November 16, 2010, 08:43:29 PM »
Sunflower oil is the most common oil were I'm from.


I don't want to disagree with you, but that's highly unlikely.  You may see a few extra containers of sunflower oil on the store shelf where you shop in particular, but sunflower oil is a rarer and more expensive oil.  Restaurants (especially with fried food items) even in your area will use the cheapest and most common oil they can get their hands on in most cases.  That would be soybean oil.  The sunflower oil numbers are so small for the United States, they don't even make the USDA list for production or consumption.

http://www.fas.usda.gov/psdonline/psdreport.aspx?hidReportRetrievalName=BVS&hidReportRetrievalID=712&hidReportRetrievalTemplateID=11

Admittedly, palm oil has been inching past soybean oil in terms of raw global production, but its usage is far more varied than just cooking.  You'll find that palm oil is in a lot of cosmetics and industrial products.

I've never purchased "Vegetable Oil" only, Olive, Corn, and canola.


I find that quite remarkable if you cook a lot, but okay.

Anyway, I used your percentage on the first page and used OO instead, I didn't follow the same method as I couldn't make pie tonight but if I get bad results I will follow your method to the T apart from Soy Bean oil.

Also tried the UltraGrain in some cookie dough and it turned out OK, it needed more sugar than normal to get a nice flavor but it didn't taste healthy  :-\


Because I thought you would be familiar with soybean oil once I pointed out that it's often called vegetable oil, I didn't mention that soybean oil has a more neutral flavor than most oils.  In cases where I don't want to taste the oil, I use either rice bran oil (my favorite) or soybean oil.

When it comes to working with whole grain flours, or some semblance thereof, the dough regiment is perhaps the most important factor.  Adding "a little of this or a little of that" for flavor, does little to affect the structure of the grain which shares a great deal of responsibility for crumb texture.  Texture, in turn, can affect flavor by changing the food's profile exposed to the palette.

Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #54 on: November 16, 2010, 09:01:59 PM »
Sorry, I forgot to mention I'm originally from the UK, sunflower was always more prominent.

When you speak of regime do you mean the kneading and proofing? 


Thanks for taking the time to respond!

Offline November

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #55 on: November 16, 2010, 09:29:26 PM »
Sorry, I forgot to mention I'm originally from the UK, sunflower was always more prominent.

In that case the race is a lot closer.  A search on the UK's Food Standards Agency website yielded 860 results for sunflower oil, and 835 results for soya oil.  Between those two, sunflower oil wins by a hair.  Of course a search for olive oil yields 1500 results.  To me that makes sense.  No matter where you're from, sunflower oil is still on the rare side.

When you speak of regime do you mean the kneading and proofing? 

That is correct.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2010, 09:37:15 PM by November »

Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #56 on: November 17, 2010, 08:33:16 PM »
Thanks for your formula November.

Here's a crumb shot of the dough I made with your formula on page one, the only difference is Olive Oil instead of Soy.

Offline norma427

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #57 on: November 17, 2010, 10:40:29 PM »
Thanks for your formula November.

Here's a crumb shot of the dough I made with your formula on page one, the only difference is Olive Oil instead of Soy.

Mick.Chicago,

Your pizza made with November's formula and olive oil looks great!  :)

Norma
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Offline charbo

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #58 on: November 18, 2010, 12:49:27 PM »
Mick,

Which are you using -- Eagle Mills All-Purpose or Eagle Mills White Whole Wheat?


Offline Mick.Chicago

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Re: Ultragrain
« Reply #59 on: November 18, 2010, 03:23:07 PM »
I'm using the All Purpose.


 

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