Author Topic: Food Processor Dough for Neapolitan-style dough  (Read 6290 times)

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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Food Processor Dough for Neapolitan-style dough
« on: February 27, 2008, 02:14:35 PM »
I've been working on this one for a while and think it is now ready to be released into the wild. It really produces an exceptionally good crust. I still prefer to use my fork mixer, but for small batches (4 pies), the food processor works better. Mine is an old Cuisinart 14-cup model fitted with the metal blade:

1. Put all flour in the bowl.
2. While the blade is spinning, pour in all of the water and mix just until dough begins coming together in a ball.
3. Allow to rest for 5 minutes
4. Turn the processor back on and count as the ball does 45 revolutions around the bowl.
5. Allow to rest for 20 minutes
6. Put starter and salt in the bowl
7. Turn the processor back on and count as the ball does 45 revolutions around the bowl.
8. Ferment and proof @ 65F for 48 hours.



Online Pete-zza

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Re: Food Processor Dough for Neapolitan-style dough
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2008, 02:21:10 PM »
Bill,

I agree that there are times where a food processor can do a better job with small dough batches than other machines. Can you tell us what size dough batch you have been using for four pies? And, have you measured the finished dough temperature for the dough when it is done? I'm sure that the two rest periods help keep the finished dough temperature under control, but I was wondering what the finished dough temperature actually is. It also sounds like you don't need to use cold water to combat the heating effects of the processor.

Peter

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Food Processor Dough for Neapolitan-style dough
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2008, 02:41:44 PM »
Peter,

Today's batch was 955g.

I often make bread using this technique (originally filched from The Best Bread Ever by Van Over) and have measured the temperatures in the past and, even with room temp water and much shorter rest periods, the temperature of the dough doesn't rise more than a few degrees and never, ever close to a level that would kill the microorganisms. The high hydration of these doughs is a buffer against rapid temperature increases. Also the stickiness of the dough probably reduces the friction.

Bill


Offline scott r

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Re: Food Processor Dough for Neapolitan-style dough
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2008, 03:50:12 PM »
Bill that is a really great photo.  Not just a good looking pizza, but a real pro looking shot!

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Food Processor Dough for Neapolitan-style dough
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2008, 05:13:58 PM »
Bill that is a really great photo.  Not just a good looking pizza, but a real pro looking shot!

Thank you, Scott. I'm trying to learn how to take better food photos. Getting this kind of shot with one hand while turning the pie with the other is a real challenge!

Bill

Offline tinroofrusted

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Re: Food Processor Dough for Neapolitan-style dough
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2013, 10:26:14 AM »
I've been working on this one for a while and think it is now ready to be released into the wild. It really produces an exceptionally good crust. I still prefer to use my fork mixer, but for small batches (4 pies), the food processor works better. Mine is an old Cuisinart 14-cup model fitted with the metal blade:

1. Put all flour in the bowl.
2. While the blade is spinning, pour in all of the water and mix just until dough begins coming together in a ball.
3. Allow to rest for 5 minutes
4. Turn the processor back on and count as the ball does 45 revolutions around the bowl.
5. Allow to rest for 20 minutes
6. Put starter and salt in the bowl
7. Turn the processor back on and count as the ball does 45 revolutions around the bowl.
8. Ferment and proof @ 65F for 48 hours.

Hey Bill, I was just wondering if you've used the plastic dough blade for mixing dough and if so what differences you've observed between the metal blade and the plastic blade.  I usually use the plastic blade for food processor dough but today I am going to try the metal blade.  One thing I have seen already is that the metal blade has a harder time getting started than the plastic blade. But that's probably a good thing, as long as it can indeed get started.  Just curious what your findings are, if any.  And that's a great photo, BTW, as someone already commented. 

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Food Processor Dough for Neapolitan-style dough
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2013, 10:38:22 AM »
Hey Bill, I was just wondering if you've used the plastic dough blade for mixing dough and if so what differences you've observed between the metal blade and the plastic blade.  I usually use the plastic blade for food processor dough but today I am going to try the metal blade.  One thing I have seen already is that the metal blade has a harder time getting started than the plastic blade. But that's probably a good thing, as long as it can indeed get started.  Just curious what your findings are, if any.  And that's a great photo, BTW, as someone already commented.


Tinroof:


Thanks.


I don't think I have ever used the plastic blade for anything. Van Over recommended the metal blade, so that is what I have always used.

Offline pizza dr

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Re: Food Processor Dough for Neapolitan-style dough
« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2013, 11:11:03 AM »
Bill

Is a 955 g batch too small for your fork mixer?  If so, I may not want to lay down any cash for one.  I was thinking about purchasing one when my KA bit the dust ( soon I hope).  I normally start with 1 kg of flour. 

Scot

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Food Processor Dough for Neapolitan-style dough
« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2013, 11:26:19 AM »
Bill

Is a 955 g batch too small for your fork mixer?  If so, I may not want to lay down any cash for one.  I was thinking about purchasing one when my KA bit the dust ( soon I hope).  I normally start with 1 kg of flour. 

Scot


Couldn't really say. I don't make batches smaller than 1500g since there are so many wonderful things you can do with leftover dough. My typical batch these days is closer to 2500g.

Offline pizza dr

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Re: Food Processor Dough for Neapolitan-style dough
« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2013, 11:43:36 AM »
Got it

What kinda stuff do you do with left over dough? 

Scot


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Offline pizza dr

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Re: Food Processor Dough for Neapolitan-style dough
« Reply #11 on: July 19, 2013, 05:04:14 PM »
I should really learn how to use that Search function thingy :-D


 

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