Author Topic: Latest attempt w/ Pics Longer Rise and Autolyse  (Read 1624 times)

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Offline yaddayaddayadda

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Latest attempt w/ Pics Longer Rise and Autolyse
« on: March 02, 2008, 10:05:17 AM »
Ok, I tried an autolyse and longer rise times for my last two attempts.  Both have been fabulous.  Details and pics:

Dough:
Flour (100%):
Water (63%):
IDY (.191%):
Salt (1.55%):
Oil (1.16%):
Total (165.901%):
Single Ball:
386.53 g  |  13.63 oz | 0.85 lbs
243.52 g  |  8.59 oz | 0.54 lbs
0.74 g | 0.03 oz | 0 lbs | 0.25 tsp | 0.08 tbsp
5.99 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.25 tsp | 0.42 tbsp
4.48 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
641.26 g | 22.62 oz | 1.41 lbs | TF = 0.1
320.63 g | 11.31 oz | 0.71 lbs

I go for two 12" pies.   For the technique, I put all the water and all but 2 oz. of the flour in the bowl of my kitchenaid and mix with the paddle attachment till combined in a batter.  Then I let it rest for 20 minutes, covered.  After the 20 mins, I add the remaining ingredients, switch to the dough hook and knead for 7 minutes on speed 2.  Then I weigh, portion and place each ball in a rubbermaid container.  These rose in the fridge for 6 days this time (previously I had done 5, but it didn't work out this week).

Sauce:

1 28 oz can of Wal-Mart great value crushed tomatoes, mixed with 1 clove of crushed garlic, a 1/2 tsp of Penzey's pizza seasoning and a tsp of EVOO.

Cheese:

Sorento full milk mutz, shredded.

Cooked for 7 1/2 mins at 500 degrees on a pizza stone


This one is the cheese pizza for the kids.  But the adults (sorry, no pics) had a sausage and pepper pizza.  I took some fresh italian sausage from a local butcher shop peeled the casing of the link, and broke into small pieces and partially cooked before adding to the pizza.  Then, I sliced some green pepper on the mandoline.

Any comments on technique?  Personally, I'm completely satisfied..but wanted to see if anyone had any pointers on my technique/recipe.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Latest attempt w/ Pics Longer Rise and Autolyse
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2008, 11:10:04 AM »
yaddayaddayadda,

That looks like a nice, tasty pizza. I like the way that you used the baker's percents to get the yeast, salt and oil to come out in standard measuring spoon sizes (e.g., 1/4t., 1.25 t., and 1 t.).

Can you tell us what flour you used, and also whether you noted the water temperature you used in making the dough?

Peter

Offline yaddayaddayadda

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Re: Latest attempt w/ Pics Longer Rise and Autolyse
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2008, 11:13:23 AM »
yaddayaddayadda,

That looks like a nice, tasty pizza. I like the way that you used the baker's percents to get the yeast, salt and oil to come out in standard measuring spoon sizes (e.g., 1/4t., 1.25 t., and 1 t.).

Can you tell us what flour you used, and also whether you noted the water temperature you used in making the dough?

Peter

Yeah, I fiddled around with the percentages till I got "normal" volume equivalents. I used king arthur bread flour.  The water was filtered from a brita pitcher. I'm not sure of the temp, it was "temperate"...not hot or cold...heated in the microwave from the fridge for 30 seconds.  Water temp / finished dough temp is one of those things I don't really see much of a difference when I vary, and am a little fuzzy on their usage.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Latest attempt w/ Pics Longer Rise and Autolyse
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2008, 11:20:48 AM »
Water temp / finished dough temp is one of those things I don't really see much of a difference when I vary, and am a little fuzzy on their usage.

yaddayaddayadda,

I am always on the lookout for ways of extending the useful lives of cold fermented doughs. Using small amounts of yeast, as you did, and low finished dough temperature, both contribute to longer useful dough life. It also helps to have a cold refrigerator to keep the dough on the cold side during fermentation.

Peter


 

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