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Offline itsinthesauce

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Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« on: November 01, 2004, 08:21:06 PM »
Pete, in the event you are ever going to talk to me again, I continue to apologize, I'm going to New York for 4 days in early December, and wanted to know if you have any suggestions on where to go to taste the best NY style.


Offline canadave

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Re:Tom Lehmann's NY Style Pizza
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2004, 09:09:49 PM »
Well, whether or not Peter's talking to you still, as an ex-New Yorker I can share my suggestions with you :)

--Lombardi's, Little Italy: The original.  Supposedly there are new owners, and the quality of the pizza has slipped, but you might want to go there if for no other reason than to be able to say you went.  When I went back in 2001, it was the best pizza I'd ever had--bar none.  No one even close.

--John's Pizza, Arturo's, Patsy's, Grimaldi's, Totonno's--these are some of the "old school", "elite" pizzerias.  Coal oven or brick oven.  These are the classics, and any one of them would be a good place to go (look them up in Google for addresses).

--My personal favourite "street" pizzeria--Ben's Pizza on 3rd Street and MacDougal Street in Greenwich Village.  Right around the corner from where I lived, right near Washington Square Park, it's a great "street pizza" in my opinion.  It's also got some lively "atmosphere" on a Saturday night ;)  It can get a little hairy (the atmosphere, not the pizza!)

--You could also try Joe's Pizza (a few blocks from Ben's, on Carmine and Bleecker Streets) if they haven't closed by the time you get there.  The landlord raised the rent on them, so they're shutting down soon, but who knows--they might still be there when you arrive.  This used to be one of the "best street pizzerias in NY" for many years, until Giuseppe stopped making the pizzas himself.  They're still rated at or near the top, but I think it's overrated now.

This is by no means an exclusive list--everyone's got their favourites (I know even on this forum, we've got a few DiFara's fans...I don't know anything about them, so I can't say yea or nay on a visit there).  Hope this helped!

Dave
« Last Edit: November 01, 2004, 09:10:30 PM by canadave »

Offline Arthur

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Re:Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2004, 09:55:48 AM »
OK....I must leave a post for this one since I grew up in NY (Brooklyn) and since my family still lives in NYC I make it a point to visit the "best" pizza places everytime I go back.

Here's my list of the places you must go :)

Best Round - Nick's in Queens - I don't know how they do it with a gas oven, but this pizza is "da best".  
Gotta Go - Lombardi's, 32 Spring Street, manhattan - first pizza place, great feel...pizza is typically great, but not always
Classic - Totonno's - Coney Island, Broolyn - just delicious
Best Square - L&B Spumoni Gardens - Brooklyn - you've never had a square pizza like this - simply heaven
Best Artist - DiFara's - Brooklyn - pizza is different with lots of cheese, but watching the artist makes it worth the trip.

Besides these five, some others:
John's - Bleeker street - good second choice
Arturo's - don't go here - pizza is NOT good
Patsy's - in da bronx - I still haven't been here
Grimaldi's - in brooklyn - haven't been here, but hear it's just so-so.



« Last Edit: November 02, 2004, 09:57:26 AM by Arthur »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re:Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2004, 11:55:42 AM »
Over the past few years, as I have researched the subject of pizza, I have attempted to collect information on some of the best known and most highly-regarded pizza restaurants in the NYC/New Haven areas, based on the results of consumer surveys and favorable reviews by restaurant reviewers and writers.  Rather than being judgmental about the restaurants, in terms of giving thumbs up or thumbs down, I have instead tried to be more fact-oriented.  There is no list of "best" pizza restaurants that I can create from my research that will please everyone.  The pizza restaurant landscape is changing daily and good places become mediocre, reputations detereiorate, and new pizza establishments arrive on the scene to take the places of those that move off the list for one reason or another.  In recent years, many of the old name pizza establishments that were once run by families that emigrated from Italy and other places decades ago have sold out to investors with expansion goals and profit in mind rather than trying to continue to put out the best pizzas possible.  Quite often, this has meant a deterioration in pizza quality, which takes a while to be noticed since the old names are still on the buildings.  I have intentionally not included "newbies" in my "database" since it usually takes several years for them to hit their stride and join what are considered to be the best of the best.  

One of the things that I discovered early on is that popularity comes at a price.  You may encounter long waits at the best and most popular places, and pizza prices will often be higher--in some cases, considerably higher--than at the less popular or less well-known places (quite often in local neighborhoods) that don't make it onto the many "best" lists put out by travel or tourist oriented operators or can't afford to spend a lot on advertising to get noticed.  Also, many of the most popular places don't accept credit cards.  So my best advice is to call in advance for hours and wait times and bring cash.  And popularity doesn't always mean that you will get a world-beating pizza.  On any given day, the quality of your pizza may well be determined by such factors as how busy the place is when you show up, the skill, experience and dedication of the pizzaiolos on duty that day, and their ability to master their often temperamental ovens, especially at the busiest times where the volume is heaviest.

I believe the data I have collected on the pizza restaurants in my "database" will be most useful in helping one to identify possible places to try out.  I will happily receive feedback or other information that might be incorporated into the database to keep it current and accurate.  Since the information I have collected is fairly long, I will post it in another post below in this thread.

Peter  
« Last Edit: November 02, 2004, 01:40:15 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline canadave

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Re:Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2004, 12:08:24 PM »
heh, Arthur...gotta disagree with you on Arturo's (unless it's totally changed since I was last there a few years ago, which is certainly possible).  I loved the taste of their pizza, used to go there all the time since a) it was a couple of blocks away from my apartment building, and b) I knew a guy who worked there as a delivery boy :)

Also, I found Grimaldi's to be very good as well.

Your review of L&B Spumoni Gardens made me drool! :)  Next time I go back to NYC I think I'm going to try to make it there.

Offline canadave

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Re:Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2004, 12:14:06 PM »
I should add a point that just occurred to me, for the benefit of itsinthesauce......

If you go to any of the big-name pizzerias I mentioned (Lombardi's, Grimaldi's, etc.), you're going to be spending a fair bit of money--it's more like a "restaurant" experience, which can run you anywhere from $20 or so to around $50 or more (assuming you're with somebody).

However, if you want a cheapo way to get great NY pizza, try some of the local street pizzerias.  I recommended my favourite, Ben's...a lot of people swear by the various Ray's Pizzas (which are, of course, all different and unrelated franchises)...and others have a particular favourite in their own neighbourhoods.

The great thing about the street pizzerias is that they sell by the slice, so you can get a couple of slices for about $3.50 or so.  And the pizza, while not classically formed in a brick or coal oven, is still the greatest pizza in the world :)  So you might want to try a bunch of local pizzerias first.

How to find a good one?  Ask someone on the street :)  Seriously.  Go up to someone who looks like a local and ask them where you can get a good slice of pizza around there.  Most New Yorkers will happily expound on this subject at length.

Dave

Offline Pete-zza

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Re:Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2004, 12:40:40 PM »
Here is the information from my "database" of the better known and regarded pizza establishments in the NYC and New Haven areas.

Lombardi's: 32 Spring Street, New York, NY 10012-4173, (212) 941-7994 (uses original 1905 bituminous coal-fired oven, and is known for its white pizza and its clam pizzas using freshly-shucked clams, although the quality of the clam pizzas as well as its pizzas overall appear to have deteriorated in recent times; uses high-gluten flour (All Trumps) in its doughs, with a period of refrigeration; a freshly-made, firm, sliceable low-moisture cow's milk mozzarella cheese; pureed and marinated "San Marzano" tomatoes (which may or may not be the San Marzano varietal); Romano cheese; and municipal New York City water)

Grimaldi's (sometimes known as Patsy's or Patsy Grimaldi's): 19 Old Fulton St., Brooklyn, NY 11201, (718) 858-4300 (uses coal-fired oven and fresh mozzarella cheese said to be made on the premises; sauce uses tomatoes imported from Italy, but apparently no herbs, garlic or other seasonings; sausage pizza--the sausage is put on raw--is said to be very good. The original owner, Patsy Grimaldi, has stepped aside from daily operations (but is now believed to be starting a new pizza business) and the business is now being run by someone outside of the family (the Ciollo family), including the opening of Grimaldi's in Hoboken, NJ, Scottsdale, AZ, Dallas, TX and Las Vegas, NV.)

Patsy's Pizza: 509 3rd Ave, New York, NY 11035, (212) 534-9783 (uses coal-fired oven; known for its thin, ethereal crust; uses San Marzano tomatoes and a fresh high-moisture mozzarella cheese on some pizzas and a fresh low-moisture mozzarella cheese on others; is the original Patsy's and now part of a local chain of Patsy's Pizzas (whose product quality apart from the original Patsy's in East Harlem is said to have seriously deteriorated); should not be confused with Patsy Grimaldi's with whom it was involved in a tradename lawsuit; also sells by the slice, but apparently only the plain cheese and tomato slices; only weakness based on reviews appears to be the quality of toppings used relative to its competitors with whom it is often compared.)

DiFara’s: 1424 Avenue J, Brooklyn, N.Y., 718-258-1367 (Makes a style of pizza that might best be described as a cross between a Neapolitan style pizza and a New York style pizza.  It uses a 75%/25% (or possibly a 50/50) combination of 00 flour (Delverde and Caputo 00 flours have been used) and high-gluten flour (All Trumps), a 75%/25% combination of the Grande brand of full-fat mozzarella cheese (which is considered by many to be the best processed mozzarella cheese available to professional pizza makers because it has no preservatives or additives) and the Grande Ovoline fresh fior-di-latte mozzarella cheese or possibly a buffalo mozzarella cheese imported from Italy, a tomato sauce made from a mixture of San Marzano and fresh tomatoes, some fresh herbs grown in the vicinity of the pizzeria, olive oil (Felippo Berio), a dusting of grana padano cheese, and grated Parmigiano-Reggiano on the side. The pizzas are baked in a gas-fired oven, requiring bake times longer than for traditional Neapolitan and NY styles. Especially well known for its fresh artichoke pizza and its Sicilian pizza.  Sells both round pizzas and square pizzas, and is one of the few to sell pizza by the slice.  Has had recurring problems with the NYC health department authorities because of code violations but is still considered by many to be one of the best pizza restaurant in the New York area as of this writing.

Nick's Pizza: 108-26 Ascan Ave. (just off Austin St.), Forest Hills, NY 11375, (718) 263-1126

Naples 45: 200 Park Ave. at 45th Street, N.Y., N.Y., (212)-972-7001 (uses Molino Caputo "00" and "0" flours imported from Naples, Italy for the pizza dough, as well as fresh yeast, salt, and water from a source in Pennsylvania that mirrors Naples' water.  San Marzano or other imported plum tomatoes and fresh cow's milk mozzarella cheese or imported buffalo mozzarella cheese used for basic toppings for the pizzas)

Totonno's Pizzeria Napolitano: 1524 Neptune Ave. between 15th and 16th Streets, Brooklyn, NY 11224-2716, (718)-372-8606 (uses a sliceable fresh cow's milk mozzarella cheese, believed to be made on the premises; offers only 4 basic pizzas, with choices of several additional toppings.  Dried marjoram is used instead of basil, and tomato sauce is simply a puree of imported Italian tomatoes. Pecorino Romano cheese and Felippo Berio olive oil are used.  Known for its "white" pies. The oven is coal-fired. Totonno's is David Rosengarten's favorite pizza restaurant.  It is also the oldest U.S. pizza restaurant that has remained in the same family. Also has establishments on 2d Ave. and in Yonkers) (Note: David Rosengarten is a well known cookbook writer, restaurant critic and food newsletter writer who lives in the NY metro area).

Frank Pepe's: 157 Wooster Street, New Haven, CT. 06511, (203) 865-5762 (serves only pizzas, with the white clam pie--which Pepe's is credited as having invented--being a specialty, using freshly-shucked clams; its Italian sausage pizza is said to be legendary; uses a 12' x 12' coal-fired oven)

Sally's Apizza: 237 Wooster Street, New Haven CT. 06511, (203) 624 5271 (features oblong pizzas, quite possibly using a 00 flour or something like it)

Modern Apizza, 874 State Street, New Haven, CT 06512, (203) 776-5306

David Rosengarten's favorite New York-area Pizza Restaurants: DiFara's (1424 Avenue J, Brooklyn, NY, 718-258-1367); Scopa (27 East 28th St., NewYork, NY, 212-686-8787, for its thin crust pizza); Manetta's, 10-76 Jackson Ave., Queens, NY, 718-786-6171, for its Naples-style pizza); Totonno's (for its NYapolitan pizza); Nick's (108-26 Ascan Ave., Queens, NY, for its NYapolitan pizza); and Candido, 1606 First Ave., between 83 and 84 Sts., New York, NY, 212-396-9401, for its NYapolitan pizza). (Note: NYapolitan--pronounced "New York-apolitan"--is David Rosengarten's name for what Peter Reinhart refers to as "neo-Neopolitan.)

Some places, like John's (now a mini-chain), were left off the list because of increasingly negative reviews (although the original John's on Bleeker St. appears to continue to receive good reviews and may deserve to be considered on its own merits). As noted above, Lombardi's and the Patsy's Pizza chain apart from the original Patsy's in East Harlem, have increasingly receiving negative reviews as of this writing. And L&B Spumoni perhaps deserves to be added to the database as a prime example of the Sicilian style.  At the time I created my database, I was focusing more on the traditional NY styles rather than the Sicilian.

Bon appetit.

Peter

« Last Edit: January 26, 2008, 07:34:44 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re:Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #7 on: November 02, 2004, 01:17:19 PM »
When I was doing my research on NY and New Haven area pizza restaurants, I was fortunate to come across an article written in 2001 by a food fanatic that went by the name of Fat Guy.  The article was on the best and worst pizza restaurants in the NY/New Haven areas.  For those who may not have heard of Fat Guy, he is a former attorney and now one of the founders of eGullet.org (he is Member No. 1), the food-oriented blog.   His real name is Steven Shaw.  When I first found the article on the Fat Guy website, I bookmarked it for future reference.  However, the website was subsequently inactivated and no matter how hard I tried to find a copy of the article on the Internet, I came up empty.  But, not too long ago, I stumbled across a link to the article in an archived site.  It is at http://web.archive.org/web/20020618175833/http://www.fat-guy.com/article/view/98. (To access the article, you will have to enter the unhighlighted part of the above link starting with www into the archive search box after http:// and click the search button.  If the article doesn't pull up and there are one or more dates shown, try clicking on one of the dates shown.  The article is too long to post--it runs several pages.  So I hope the process I just described works.

Because I think the article is extremely well written, I believe it is well worth reading.  The article is a bit dated now, of course, but it is full of useful information and insights on the New York area pizza scene.  I believe that much of what the Fat Guy (which is still his handle) said in 2001 still holds true today.

Peter
« Last Edit: February 07, 2005, 11:44:08 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re:Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #8 on: November 02, 2004, 01:38:12 PM »
Reference was made in an earlier post about Ray's.  

For anyone who spends a lot of time in NYC, it will be hard for you not to notice as you travel around the city a lot of pizza restaurants with the name "Ray" or a variation of that name.  As a matter of fact, at latest count, there are 47 such pizza establishments listed in the NYC telephone directory.  To be specific, they are as follows (with the number of stores in parentheses): Famous Original Rays Pizza (12), Original Ray's Pizza (4), Ray's Pizza (13), RayBari Pizza (5), World Famous Ray's Pizza (4), Famous Rays of Greenwich Village (1), Original Rays Pizza (1), Ray's Original Pizza (1), Best Ray Pizza (1), Ray's Pizza Restaurant (1), Rays Pizza (1), Ray's Pizza and Bagel Café (1), New York Rays Pizza (1), and Ray Bono Pizza (1).   There was once (but apparently no longer) a place in Brooklyn called "No Ray's".

You might wonder who this "Ray" was.  Peter Reinhart, in his book American Pie, presented one version of the story behind all the Ray's.  The Food Network also presented its own version, in a segment on cable TV not too long ago.   I don't know which version is correct, but, according to the Food Network version, there never was a "Ray".   The Food Network version has it that the original "Ray" was actually named Ralph (Ralph Como), who many years ago (in 1929) opened a pizza restaurant in the Little Italy section of New York (Prince and Mott Streets).  Somehow, the name Ralph was transformed to Ray (allegedly a friend of Ralph's called him "Rayfie", which then became "Ray"), and a spun-off location ultimately evolved into the Famous Original Ray's mini-chain owned by another person.  The other "Ray's" were copycats and, as you might suspect, there were lawsuits over the use of the name Ray.  In case you are wondering, the "real" "original" Ray's (or "Ralph's") is still at Mott and Prince Streets.  

Peter

Dana

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Question about Full Moon Pizzeria/Bronx
« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2005, 06:34:59 PM »
My aunt just sent the family a book on Arthur Ave. in the Bronx and one of the pizzerias that was mentioned was Full Moon.  I'm hoping that someone can answer this question...is this the same place that use to have Half Moon pizzeria in the late 60's.  My father grew up in the
Bronx and we use to visit his mother when I was a kid and I distinctly remember eating pizza there. It is by far the best pizza I have ever eaten.  I always wondered if the business had stayed in the neighborhood all these years since.  If anyone knows whether this is indeed the same restaurant that I remember as a child, please let me know.  Thanks.


Offline JF_Aidan_Pryde

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Re: Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #10 on: January 07, 2005, 06:31:26 AM »
Pete, I'm reading the long article you linked up right now and I have to say, it's fantastic.  :o

Offline friz78

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Re: Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2005, 10:09:27 PM »
Great Article.  I now have to plan my next business trip to NYC sooner than expected!  Pete, if you had to recommend one restaurant to try in NYC, if you only had one night in town, which one would it be?  I know you don't like to offer personal opinions on restaurants, but I respect yours immensely.
Friz

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #12 on: February 08, 2005, 12:40:27 PM »
Friz,

There are people on this forum that are far better equipped and qualified to answer your question than I, but if I had to pick one place whose pizza I would like to try in the NYC area it would be Di Fara's, in Brooklyn. My choice is based on two considerations. First, Tony DeMarco is a master pizza maker of the old school and, when he goes, Di Fara's may well go too, so I would like to try the pizza of a real artist while I can. Second, DeMarco uses some of the highest qualities ingredients and toppings available, from San Marzano tomatoes (combined with fresh tomatoes), Grande cheese, imported buffalo mozzarella cheese, fresh herbs, and Parmigiano-Reggiano and grana padano hard cheeses. As just about everyone on this forum knows, these are not cheap ingredients. I suspect I will like a De Marco pizza, but I won't really know until I actually try one. I would also love to watch De Marco at work. And maybe I can get a few more clues about his dough, which uses 00 flour and high-gluten flour, to help me try to replicate it.

Beyond Di Fara's, I would also like to try Patsy's (the original one that pftaylor and Jeff like so well), Ben's in Greenwich Village (on Canadave's recommendation), Nick's (on Arthur's recommendation), and the Ray's at Prince and Mott Sts. (and maybe the one in Greenwich Village).  Outside of the City, I would like to try Pepe's and Sally's in New Haven.  Once I get all of these places out of my system, then I would most likely go to the old names like Totonno's (the only one of the old pizza places still within the family), Grimaldi's, etc.

Whichever place you decide to try, you will have to report back to us.

Peter
« Last Edit: February 08, 2005, 12:44:54 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline friz78

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Re: Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #13 on: February 08, 2005, 10:07:19 PM »
Thanks Pete.  This is going back about 8 years ago, but when I lived in Brooklyn at that time one of my favorite pizza restaurants was a place called Nino's Pizzeria in Carroll Gardens (just south of Brooklyn Heights).  Exact address is:
Nino Pizzeria, 531 Henry St Brooklyn NY 11231 (718) 834-0863

I'm not sure if it's still the same quality, but it was a classic NY trattoria restaurant and NY style pizza was their specialty.  Although, it would probably be classified more as a "street slice" pizzeria, but it was one of the finest.

Offline Arthur

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Re: Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2005, 03:19:16 PM »
Friz,

Here's my suggestions:

- DiFara's in brooklyn.  Even though I lived in brooklyn for the first 18 years of my life I have only gone there recently.  I personally think the pizza was too cheesy/greasy but watching the master was something else and since his pie is quite different than any others I would make this a place to visit.  Classification - Artisan pizza.

- A tie between Totonnos (brooklyn), Patsy's (bronx), John's (village) for what my good friend from brooklyn refers to as "old man" pizza (meaning the old style elite pizza).  I (for some strange reason) have not been to patsy's as of yet, but I prefer Totonnos over John's.  Classification - "Old Man" elite pizza.

- Lombardi's (32 Spring Street NYC) - personally not as good as Totonnos, but the first one and you have to see the old oven.  Classification - first pizza place (elite)

- Nick's - Queens - personally my favorite.  The place is new - no old world charm, but the pizza is amazing good with the gas oven.  Classification - elite pizza with a gas oven

- L&B Spumoni Gardens (brooklyn) - without a doubt the best square pizza with the best atmosphere - if you want to experience "true" brooklyn go to L&B.  Classification - Just get the square.

- Your favorite street pizza - there are so many.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2005, 01:20:49 PM »
To my list of pizza places to try, I might have added the Una Pizza Napoletana pizza establishment to my list, because of the fanatical devotion to pizza making of its owner (Anthony Mangieri). As previous posts have indicated, the doughs used by UPN are made using a piece of dough (I refer to it as a chef) from the previous day's dough. Also the dough is allowed to rise at room temperature for a total of 36 hours. I was told by the supplier of flour (Caputo 00) to UPN that the owner starts making the dough, entirely by hand, starting at 1:00 AM each day. It's hard to imagine that the crust isn't loaded with flavor. This labor-intensive approach, along witht the use of high-cost high-quality toppings and, I am told, very high per square-foot rental costs, translates into a high-cost product. But, sometimes, you just have to go for it.

Peter
« Last Edit: February 10, 2005, 01:22:27 PM by Pete-zza »

Festa

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Re: Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #16 on: March 13, 2005, 08:20:35 PM »
#1-Emilios in Commack

#2-L&B in Brooklyn

#3-Ginos in Long Beach

#4-Totonnos, NY

#5-Patio Pizza, St. James

#6-Little Vincents in Lake Ronkonkoma...why don't they make sicilian??

#7-Rosas in Port Washington...best Grandma Ever!

#8-La Scala in Commack...great regular!

#9-A&J in Forest Hills

#10-Vesuvio in Bay Ridge

Not on the list: Nicks, Queens...but why is the bottom always black?  It makes it taste bitter

rover

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Re: Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #17 on: March 20, 2005, 01:45:18 PM »
#8-La Scala in Commack...great regular!

GREATEST EVER!!! (i work there) ;)

J Berman

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Re: Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #18 on: June 05, 2005, 10:49:41 PM »
L&B Spumoni Garden rocks on the Sicilian -- must note that
they've got the cheese and sauce reversed somehow
so it's not typical...great and great spumoni too.
Also the restaurant they run there is great too.

Just had Joe's on Bleeker in there new location --
good regular but the Sicilian was bad.

Offline Arthur

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Re: Best NYC Pizza Restaurants?
« Reply #19 on: June 06, 2005, 08:54:10 AM »
L&B Spumoni Garden rocks on the Sicilian

I remember taking a business course in college where (believe it or not) the subject matter was pizza and the focus was on consistency.   The professor was making the point of consistency of products using a story about how he loved this pie he ordered from a place (in upstate NY) and thought it was the greatest pizza ever.  He then ordered the second a week later and it wasn't what he remembered and therefore never ordered another pie from this place.   Although I have not been to some of the "great" places more than once I probably have been to Spumoni Gardens 100 times or so and they are consistently good.  Since their Sicilian is like no other I have tasted it's hard to compare to others.  It should be a must go for any of the pizza-phanatics on this site.

BTW, on the basis of consistency Nick's is no longer in my top places, but Una Pizza Napoletana (although I've only been there once) is now worth an immediate second trip.