Author Topic: Question: Original Godfather's Crust?  (Read 7879 times)

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Offline gitarslinger

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Question: Original Godfather's Crust?
« on: March 23, 2008, 03:29:16 PM »
Does anybody remember Godfather's back when it was good?  I'm talking 1978 here, as things started to go downhill around '81.  Godfather's back in the early Omaha days is what I mean.  A nice, thick, chewy crust.  And a sauce that tasted nasty when it bunched up along the edges, but made a wonderful pizza otherwise.

Anybody know how to recreate that?  Every once in a while I get a craving for things gone by...

Jim


Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Question: Original Godfather's Crust?
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2008, 09:30:29 AM »
The Godfather's chain went down hill after Pillsbury bought them in 1984.  As with most buy-outs, to recoup the cost of buying the restaurants, Pillsbury cut costs by cutting the quality and amount of the ingredients used in the pizzas, and the rest, as they say is history.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godfather's_Pizza

I have been experimenting with a dough and sauce recipe that is from a now defunct local chain called Big Cheese (there are other Big Cheese pizza chains in the country, but this one was regional and located in Kansas).  The pizza was virtually identical to Godfather's.  When I get a chance, I will scrounge up the recipes and post them.

But to be more accurate as to Godfather's you can check past threads on the forum, like this one:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3995.msg33350.html#msg33350
:chef:
« Last Edit: March 24, 2008, 09:52:00 AM by Mad_Ernie »
Let them eat pizza.

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Question: Original Godfather's Crust?
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2008, 03:14:21 PM »
Well, I was able to do some searching on the internet and I found the recipe for the Big Cheese pizza sauce and crust that I previously mentioned.  In looking at it now, it may not be a close enough replication of the Godfather's pizza crust and sauce. As I said, the Big Cheese chain in my area was a knock-off of Godfather's, right down to the restaurants' layouts and video games, although we had both chains in the area and a few Godfather's still exist around here.  I suspect a former Godfather's employee from Nebraska must have moved south and tried starting his/her own local chain in Kansas.   

http://www.recipelink.com/mf/31/8195

The measurements listed are in volumes, but you could try using the dough tools and coming up with weight measurements.  Just as an eyeball guess, the hydration content looks somewhere between 60-65% for what the recipe calls for in water.  I'm not a good judge on thickness, but again as a guess I would say it is somewhere between 0.1-0.15".  The salt content seems somewhat lower than I would normally expect, but then it's been a while since I used this recipe.  This recipe may not be close enough for you, and it does not go into the pans that are normally used (since Godfather's would be considered a pan pizza in my estimation and not a true deep-dish) or how those pans should be treated for baking.  Just from memory, I would say you should use an all-purpose flour, like King Arthur's AP, but you might get some interesting and good results if you were to use a high-gluten flour.  :pizza:

If you decide to give this or any other recipe a shot, let us know how it turns out. :)
Let them eat pizza.