Author Topic: Yeast??  (Read 1508 times)

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Offline pizzagrande

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Yeast??
« on: April 14, 2008, 02:42:52 PM »
I have been having trouble with the dough raising after its refrigerated. I have been using Active Dry Yeast is there a difference between that and the IDY. :(


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Yeast??
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2008, 03:27:10 PM »
pizzagrande,

As you will note from the definitions for Active Dry Yeast (ADY) and Instant Dry Yeast (IDY) in the forum's Pizza Glossary at http://www.pizzamaking.com/pizza_glossary.html#A, there are differences between the two forms of yeast. However, to be more specific in your case, it will be necessary to see your dough recipe and how you have been using the yeast in your recipe.

Peter

Offline pizzagrande

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Re: Yeast??
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2008, 03:50:24 PM »
Pete I used your recipe of Lehmans NY pizza, also neo-neopolitano, and Reinharts Basic Foccacia. They all came out good but the rise took way to long, ie the foccacia i was going to dump it but left it out overnite covered and made it the next day, it was really awsome, but the raise was to long. I am wondering if my yeast may be going south, but I keep it refrigerated it may be 6 months old but it works for everything I make that i dont refrigerate. Just a little puzzled ???

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Yeast??
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2008, 05:04:08 PM »
pizzagrande,

I can't speak for the neo-neapolitano and Reinhart foccacia recipes, but the basic Lehmann NY style recipe is a commercial recipe intended to be used by professional pizza operators. As such, one of the main purposes of the recipe is to produce dough balls that won't rise excessively while they are under refrigeration. Using small amounts of yeast and keeping the finished dough temperature around 80-85 degrees F (75-80 degrees F in a home refrigerator environment) will usually satisfy this objective. At the same time, the dough balls should last up to three days or more (even though most pizza operators tend to use a one-day window of usability). What is most important when using small amounts of yeast is that the finished dough temperature be in the abovementioned range. To accomplish this, we use a water temperature that will achieve a finished dough temperature in that range.

In your case, there are a few things that you can consider. One, you can use more yeast and warmer water such that your finished dough temperature is higher than the range mentioned above. This combination will speed up the rate of fermentation and result in a dough that rises faster, even while in the refrigerator. However, the useful life of the dough will be reduced, usually to about a day or so. Also, the crust flavors will not be nearly as pronounced as you will get by using less yeast and a longer fermentation time.

Two, you can try another dough recipe that is intended to produce results within a few hours, or up to several hours but not held overnight. These doughs are sometimes called "emergency" doughs or "short-term" doughs. To make these doughs, the usual practice is to substantially increase the amounts of yeast and use very warm water. The dough balls will rise very quickly and be usable within two to four hours. The downside is that, for most people, the finished crust will not have particularly good color, texture or taste. However, for some people, speed is more important. And there are people who actually prefer the pizzas made that way. It is essentially a matter of personal preference. I am aware of several pizza recipes that fall into the few-hours same-day category. If you would like a few links to those recipes, I'd be happy to provide them.

Three, you can use a combination of room temperature fermentation and cold fermentation. For example, after the dough has been made, it can be left to ferment at room temperature for a few hours and then refrigerated. This will cause the dough to be ready sooner. If you use enough yeast, you might even be able to use the dough the same day.

I think your yeast may be fine, especially if you have had no problems with the yeast with other kinds of yeasted baked goods. I have yeast that I have kept in my freezer for longer than six months and have not had any problems with it in any of my dough recipes. If you are using the three-strip packets of yeast and they are sealed, I think they may still be OK if you refrigerated them rather than freezing them. Otherwise, I would buy a fresh supply to be on the safe side. You can also "proof" the yeast. The way to do this for ADY is described here: http://www.breadworld.com/FAQ.aspx.

Peter   

Offline pizzagrande

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Re: Yeast??
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2008, 06:46:53 PM »
Thanks Pete. I have only been on here a short while and you have been very helpful to me and everyone else on here. I saw where you mentioned your son lives in Scottsdale, well if you come out to Arizona again LMK I am in Sun City, maybe we can go to Pizzeria Bianco if you have time.
Thanks again and yes I would appreciate the 2 recfipes you spoke about. :D

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Re: Yeast??
« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2008, 07:28:17 PM »
pizzagrande,

You might want to take a look at this post that contains links to several short-term dough recipes: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3736.msg48427.html#msg48427 (Reply 25). The same thread, which begins at
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3736.msg31160.html#msg31160, also covers a short-term dough recipe. There is also a very good modified-poolish NY style dough recipe at this thread: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5851.msg49940.html#msg49940. That recipe is recited using volume measurements. I took a stab at it at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5851.msg55474.html#msg55474 (see Replies 46, 47 and 52). The pizza can be made same day.

When I was in Scottsdale in January, I actually tried to go with my family to Bianco's. I had arrived mid-week and planned to go to Bianco's shortly thereafter when maybe the place would not be so busy, but everyone except me was sick. So, we didn't have a chance to make to Bianco's until Friday of that week. However, traffic was so heavy that, while we made it to Bianco's at the opening hour, there was already a long line with a 2-3 hour wait. With a young granddaughter in tow, there was no way that we were going to hold out that long. Plus, everyone was already hungry.

Peter

Offline pizzagrande

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Re: Yeast??
« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2008, 08:11:44 PM »
Yup I hear that alot about Biancos place and although I live right here ( although I grew up in the city NY and my memories of great pizza still linger) I have never been there, as my wife says why do we have to wait 3 hours on line for pizza? when yours is great! How much better can it be. Well I gues thats what a wife should say, but I am still going to try it someday (Maybe). Thanks for the recipe links


 

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