Author Topic: yeast types  (Read 2415 times)

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Offline Denny

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yeast types
« on: February 27, 2008, 05:44:34 PM »
Can I use a quick type yeast in place of a cake yeast? Thanks Den


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: yeast types
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2008, 06:01:56 PM »
Denny,

If you mean one of the so-called "quick rise" yeasts, like the Fleischmann's Rapid-Rise yeast, the answer is yes. You would use it at the rate of one-third the weight of the cake yeast. The same applies to instant dry yeast. If you use active dry yeast, the rate of use is one-half the weight of the cake yeast.

Peter

Offline Denny

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Re: yeast types
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2008, 06:06:47 PM »
Thanks Peter, Do you know how the yeast effects the taste of the dough? If is does. Den

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: yeast types
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2008, 06:15:04 PM »
Den,

Some time ago, the folks at the American Institute of Baking made test doughs using the three different kinds of yeast (fresh, ADY and IDY) and they couldn't tell the difference in the finished crusts. No doubt, there are people who will claim that they can tell the difference. In my own personal experience, I can't tell the difference between IDY and ADY. The supermarkets near me don't carry the fresh yeast so I haven't had the opportunity to do any taste tests using that yeast.

Peter

Offline gns67

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Re: yeast types
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2008, 08:11:57 PM »
Den,

Some time ago, the folks at the American Institute of Baking made test doughs using the three different kinds of yeast (fresh, ADY and IDY) and they couldn't tell the difference in the finished crusts. No doubt, there are people who will claim that they can tell the difference. In my own personal experience, I can't tell the difference between IDY and ADY. The supermarkets near me don't carry the fresh yeast so I haven't had the opportunity to do any taste tests using that yeast.

Peter

So Peter,
Do you think it's OK to swap out ADY for IDY?  I really hate the hassle of proofing the ADY.  Seems like it would be much easier to dump the ingredients in the mixer and go.  Would the ratio be any different from ADY to IDY?

Thanks,
George

Offline Jackitup

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Re: yeast types
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2008, 08:42:53 PM »
Hi Peter,
 If you wanted to try the cake yeast, any local bakery would probably sell you some or give you a chunk to try. I've gotten it from our local bakery before. But, as you know, it does have a fridge life of a week or so, not much more than that. I've found it gives a nicer, more airy rise to breads, but the convenience of shelf life and ease of use the dry wins out with me.
Jon
Save A Cow, Eat A Vegan....Totally Organic And Hormone Free!!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: yeast types
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2008, 09:48:31 PM »
Jon,

For the longest time, there were no bread bakers near where I live. I would have to go into Dallas, which was impractical. Even then, some of the places best known for their breads get the dough delivered to them from central commissaries. However, I read recently that a new bakery was opening up near me. I think the only dough that I would use the fresh yeast with is a Neapolitan style dough with 00 flour. For most other doughs, using IDY or ADY is more convenient.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: yeast types
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2008, 08:43:55 AM »
George,

As you will note from this yeast chart, http://www.theartisan.net/convert_yeast_two.htm, when switching from ADY to IDY, you use about 25% less of the IDY, by weight. Technically, you should adjust the formula hydration (upwardly) by the difference in yeast weights, but for most home pizza makers and recipes that adjustment is small and can be safely ignored in most cases. If fresh yeast is replaced by a dry form of yeast, however, I would make the adjustment because of the much higher water content of the fresh yeast.

Peter

Offline toyman

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Re: yeast types
« Reply #8 on: May 19, 2008, 09:58:01 AM »
I've learned a lot on this site, and now need more info!  In my current recipe, I mix my flour & yeast (IDY) together dry and then add water until I get a ball.  Then it rests for 20 minutes, at which time I add olive oil then salt, then in the fridge for 24 hours rise.  If I got to ADY, which my wife picked up for me, can I still do the dry ingredients first, or do I have to proof the ADY? 

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: yeast types
« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2008, 12:10:38 PM »
If I got to ADY, which my wife picked up for me, can I still do the dry ingredients first, or do I have to proof the ADY? 

toyman,

The recommended method of activating (rehydrating) ADY is to dissolve it in a small amount of the formula water (about 4-5 times the weight of the ADY), at about 105 degrees F, for about 10 minutes. The rest of the formula water can be cool (otherwise the dough may ferment too fast). There are some tricks that some pizza and bread makers use in which the ADY is kept dry, but the cases are few and I would not recommend them to our members except under close supervision.

Peter


Offline toyman

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Re: yeast types
« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2008, 01:39:11 PM »
Peter - As always, thanks for the info.  I made up a batch with IDY on Sunday.  When I finished forming the balls, I immediately vacuum packed them for future use.  I pulled a ball out on Monday evening and put in the fridge.  I took it out of the fridge Tuesday evening and let it on the counter for a few hours and made a pizza for my staff meeting today.   The dough was very good and easy to form.  I also tried a new sauce recipe:  28 oz can of Delallo San Marzano tomatoes, 2 lg cloves of garlic, sugar, salt, basil & oregano.  It was a little runnier than I'm used to, but tasted fantastic.  I got the seal of approval from my family and my employees.  It's my new red sauce.  Delallo's works out great for me since I only live about 15 miles from them, and my local grocery stores carry a lot of their products.  ;)