Author Topic: Thin Crust with Semolina  (Read 11872 times)

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Offline rcbaughn

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Re: Thin Crust with Semolina
« Reply #25 on: April 24, 2012, 01:51:16 AM »
Hey CDN! Thank you so much for the compliments, it is good to hear that I am not being overly active or a pest. :-D I don't ever want to be the guy who is always asking and never contributing, but I guess I'm learning for now.

I was actually scared to try to use the dough tool. I didn't really understand the use of percentages in baking, but finally figured out the tool completely tonight! I am still absolutely lost on thickness factors, but as long as the thickness factor is provided in the recipe I can do the rest. I am going to try a Mellow Mushroom pie next using Pete's #8 formulation tonight and let it ferment till tomorrow evening. I absolutely love that I can hop on here, spend a few hours reading, then go attempt a pie recipe in a day or two, and even sometimes the same day. Maybe I can post on it tomorrow in the American Style thread and have a good pie.

I am going to go back to the Chicago thin crust style after the Mellow Mushroom one tomorrow for sure, I know that it didn't turn out exactly right or how I wanted it to. I want to get it knocked out to where I can at least make a decent pie that I am happy with. Have a great one though and happy baking this week!    -Cory

More is better..... and too much is just right.


Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Thin Crust with Semolina
« Reply #26 on: April 24, 2012, 11:54:11 AM »
Cory,

I might be able to help you better understand the "thickness factor" deal. I recently read a post somewhere on the forum here that made the light bulb go on in my head. Hope I don't butcher it up too much!

All you need to do is think of it as a RATIO.....thickness factor(x) is a percentage of an ounce of dough....and that small amount of dough is how much you will find in (y), a given area of the rolled out dough. I think (y) is one square inch of area.     So,you have dough weight : surface area.   You want it thicker? You up the thickness factor # (weight) in relation to the area (y).  The number is NOT a measurement number (1/16"),it is percent of an ounce.
The thickness factor numbers we see on the recipes are a given that that has been established from peoples trials and errors....it gives you a starting point.

Now, I hope someone will chime in here if I have this all cornballed up..... :-D

Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Thin Crust with Semolina
« Reply #27 on: April 24, 2012, 12:32:59 PM »
This thread may be helpful on the matter of thickness factor: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,17813.0.html.

Peter

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Thin Crust with Semolina
« Reply #28 on: April 24, 2012, 07:12:33 PM »
This thread may be helpful on the matter of thickness factor: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,17813.0.html.

Peter
Peter,

Is there something that I missed in my explanation to Cory?  I'm here to learn too,thanks.

Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Thin Crust with Semolina
« Reply #29 on: April 24, 2012, 10:01:48 PM »
Peter,

Is there something that I missed in my explanation to Cory?  I'm here to learn too,thanks.

Bob

Bob,

I believe you stated the matter correctly. It is ounces per surface area, where the area is given in square inches. I usually think of the matter in mathematical terms, where the thickness factor is equal to the dough ball weight divided by the surface area of the skin formed from the dough ball. So, for example, for a skin with a radius R, the thickness factor, TF, is equal to the dough ball weight divided by the expression (3.14159 x R x R). As the value of R goes up, the thickness factor goes down, and vice versa. I use the expression "thickness factor" but Tom Lehmann uses the expression "density loading factor".

For a shape other than circular, the same principles apply. For example, for a rectangular or square pizza skin, the thickness factor is equal to the dough ball weight divided by the expression (L x W). If you made an oval skin, the thickness factor would be equal to the dough ball weight divided by the surface area of the oval skin. In all cases, it is weight per square inch.

Peter


Offline rcbaughn

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Re: Thin Crust with Semolina
« Reply #30 on: April 26, 2012, 04:01:15 AM »
I just saw all the thickness factor replies. Thanks guys, you are all awesome. I am going to go read it all right now before I go bake my MM pie. -Cory
More is better..... and too much is just right.

Offline David Deas

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Re: Thin Crust with Semolina
« Reply #31 on: April 26, 2012, 07:45:20 AM »
Speaking of Buzz, what ever happened to him?  He still around under a different handle or something?


 

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