Author Topic: My dough is popping out all over - too much raise *Pics*  (Read 2172 times)

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Offline Adam T

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My dough is popping out all over - too much raise *Pics*
« on: April 26, 2008, 02:22:24 PM »
I used the following recipe and my dough is raising almost out of control. I made this dough yesterday and this morning it's popping out of it's container.

1 lb 13.4 oz King Arthur Bread flour
1 lb 1.2 oz Water
1.3 Tablespoons Salt
1.8 Tablespoons Olive Oil
3.67 Tablespoons Raw Sugar
1.84 Tablespoons Honey
2 packages (.25 oz each) Red Star brand active dry yeast (before now I thought I was using IDY, oops)

I dissolved the honey sugar and yeast into 120 degree water and then added half of the flour and salt. Mixed for two minutes and added the rest of the flour and salt and also added the olive oil. Kneaded in my KA mixer for 6 minutes, let set for 5 minutes, kneaded again for 6 minutes. I separated the dough into a 2lbs ball and a 1.23 lbs ball for a 17" and 14" pizza. I coated with olive oil and placed in refrigerator within 10 or 15 minutes.

I've made this recipe before and didn't have a problem with it raising too much. This time making the dough it was warmer in the house and more humid than before. Seeing it raising as much as it did I even turned my fridge colder.

Any advice on what to do now or how to prevent this in the future. I was planing on taking the dough out 2 or 3 hours before baking the pizza, should I reduce this to an hour if the dough is already raised enough?
« Last Edit: April 26, 2008, 10:39:32 PM by Adam T »


Online Pete-zza

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Re: My dough is popping out all over - too much raise
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2008, 03:51:14 PM »
Adam T,

If I understood your post correctly and that you previously used ADY successfully thinking that it was IDY, and that the only other thing that changed this time was making the dough in a warmer and more humid room, then it is possible that the excessive rise in the dough was due to the warmer room temperature. I estimate from the numbers that you gave that the total elapsed time before the dough went into the refrigerator was around 30-35 minutes and possibly a bit longer when accounting for the minor times between steps. That might have been enough time for the finished dough to achieve the higher room temperature and most likely higher because you used the entire formula water at 120 degrees F. Under the circumstances, I would punch the overrisen dough balls down and put them back into their containers and into the coolest part of your refrigerator until you are ready to use them. When you are ready to use the dough balls, I would let them get to about 60 degrees F before shaping and stretching. That might only take an hour, depending on your room temperature at the time.

Next time, you may want to rehydrate the ADY properly should you decide to continue to use the ADY. IDY can tolerate water temperatures of around 120-130 degrees F when first mixed in with the flour, but ADY is required to be rehydrated in water at a temperature of around 105 degrees F for about 10 minutes before it is combined with the rest of the water or other ingredients. You only need a small amount of the formula water to rehydrate the ADY--about four times the weight of the ADY. The rest of the formula water can be kept cool. Keeping the rest of the formula water cool will also slow down the rate of fermentation of the dough balls and keep them from rising so quickly. The effect of the accelerated fermentation is to shorten the window of utility of the dough balls. So, you may not to want to go out several days before using them.

My practice is to try to achieve a finished dough temperature of around 75-80 degrees F. I do this by controlling the temperature of the water. Otherwise, the dough can start to ferment too quickly if the finished dough temperature is higher than 75-80 degrees F. 

Peter

Offline Adam T

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Re: My dough is popping out all over - too much raise *Pics*
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2008, 10:51:02 PM »
Good info Pete, thanks!

We made the pizzas tonight. We made 8 pizzas tonight... 6 of Randy's Papa John's recipe (I posted above). We also made 2 pan pizzas using xPHmgr's Pizza Hut pan pizza recipe.

Here are some pictures... (The rectangle pizza is one of the pan pizzas.)
I shredded around 6 lbs of cheese for tonight.


Offline Adam T

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Re: My dough is popping out all over - too much raise *Pics*
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2008, 10:52:32 PM »
A couple more pizzas.  :)

Online Pete-zza

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Re: My dough is popping out all over - too much raise *Pics*
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2008, 08:38:01 AM »
Adam T,

From the looks of your pizzas, everything seemed to work out well despite the meteoric rise of your dough balls.

One of the points that I try to hammer home as much as possible is that the quantity of yeast and finished dough temperature are, in my opinion, the two most important factors that control the fermentation process. As best I can tell, as between the two factors, Tom Lehmann might say that under normal circumstances the finished dough temperature is more important than yeast quantity. I don't know if this means that a dough with a small amount of yeast and a high finished dough temperature will ferment faster than a dough with a large amount of yeast and a low finished dough temperature, but I think that there is little doubt that, all else being equal, a dough with a large amount of yeast and a high finished dough temperature will result in the fastest rate of fermentation. I think that is what you experienced.

Of all the points that Tom Lehmann makes about dough preparation and management, I would say that attention to finished dough temperature is the one he mentions most frequently, even when he can't otherwise diagnose a problem presented to him for his review. A good example of his advice on this point is given at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=13501#13501. You will also note that Tom mentions some of the effects of weather changes on finished dough temperature.

Peter

Offline Trinity

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Re: My dough is popping out all over - too much raise *Pics*
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2008, 10:23:49 AM »
Awesome pies man!!! :chef:
It's an Earth food. They are called Swedish meatballs. It's a strange thing, but every sentient race has its own version of these Swedish meatballs! I suspect it's one of those great universal mysteries which will either never be explained, or which would drive you mad if you ever learned the truth.

Offline Adam T

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Re: My dough is popping out all over - too much raise *Pics*
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2008, 06:15:16 PM »
Awesome pies man!!! :chef:

Thanks. It was a lot of fun.


 

pizzapan