Author Topic: 2Stone high temperature ovens  (Read 46693 times)

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Offline scott r

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #180 on: March 30, 2009, 01:57:59 AM »
I use the Chris Bianco method, form the disc on the peel,  dress it completely & then pull the sides & top & bottom so that the pie is @ the edge of the peel.

Matt


A 2nd stretch of the pizza after dressing is also the technique used at most pizzerias in Naples.   
« Last Edit: March 30, 2009, 02:00:35 AM by scott r »


Offline 2stone

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #181 on: April 07, 2009, 09:22:04 PM »
It keeps evolving.

Here are some drawings of our first
"2stone Pizza Kiosk" slated to open
in Moss, Norway some time in May.

Willard

Speedy, Your pies look great,
Try and PM Scott Smith who has really put his
2stone through the paces at super high heat. He
uses foil under the stone to cut down the bottom heat.
Otherwise experiment with opening or closing the grill when you bake.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2009, 07:39:09 AM by 2stone »
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Offline andreguidon

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #182 on: April 08, 2009, 06:28:06 AM »
Very nice Willard !!!
"Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication." Leonardo da Vinci

Offline mmarston

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #183 on: April 08, 2009, 06:32:37 AM »
What about winter?
Nobody cares if you can't dance well.  Just get up and dance.  Dave Barry

Offline 2stone

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #184 on: April 08, 2009, 07:52:47 AM »
Thanks Andre,

There will be an option for a heated tile floor (both inside and out)
And otherwise it is not specifically targeted for the winter. The ovens
generate a lot of heat so its surprisingly comfortable in the cold. I excpect
it will be run all year any way, since I've seen someone do it here in michigan.
We are situated close by the lake traffic from Chicago and that market typically runs
for a busy 6 months out of the year. -wg
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Offline sourdough girl

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #185 on: April 08, 2009, 02:53:30 PM »
Hey, Willard

Those drawings are GREAT!  If my health hadn't taken such a sharp left turn, I'd step up and say "Let's try this in Washington!!"  I think it would be great fun... and I have no doubt it would be profitable, since I can think of nothing like it around here.  You see coffee kiosks on every corner... so why not pizza?

I'm curious as to why Norway was chosen for the first location... probably familial ties, but is the market also less saturated with pizza?  Are you planning to introduce this concept to the U.S. at some point?  I think it would be a good fit with those wanting to open a pizzeria on a smaller scale.  Seems like it would be a great franchise opportunity for all involved.

The weather is warming up and I've recuperated pretty well... so it will SOON be time to fire up my 2stone and I will be back to posting pics on both websites!  I am looking forward to playing with wild yeast (mine!) and Caputo 00 Pizzeria that a very kind member (Essen1) sent me to experiment with.  Spring... and a return to 2stone pizza!   ;D

~sd
« Last Edit: April 08, 2009, 03:03:11 PM by sourdough girl »
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Offline 2stone

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #186 on: April 09, 2009, 09:31:52 PM »
Hi Sd,

Thanks,....Hope you are doing OK... Someone else was also telling me that Seattle has a well developed Kiosk culture.
Yes you got it... I have all my family with the exception of my sister out where you are living there, so I get over there a bit.
Norway has a long standing tradition of street kitchens and kiosks, and people really celebrate the outdoors when it is nice weather.
So we'll see how it goes, pizza is very popular there and they are starting to get interested in higher quality thin crust. 

That's great your getting to try out the Caputo, that was nice of Essen 1. Just getting to the end of my 50lb bag so its time to get some more. I'm looking forward to setting up outside again. We have had several false starts of spring only to get swamped with snow again.

You make some great looking pies, so I'm looking forward to seeing some more.

regards,
Willard
2Stone blog: www.2stoneblog.com

Offline TronCarter

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #187 on: April 29, 2009, 10:56:50 AM »
Hey Willard,

The kiosk looks awesome.  It gives me some ideas about a cool backyard project.  I have always wanted an outdoor kitchen for when it gets hot during the summer.  I have somewhat thought about an outdoor hearth oven, but keep thinking that a wood fired oven, while pretty darn cool, would probably be more effort than I would end up going through very often.  Also, a hearth oven may or may not be attractive to a potential buyer if I ever want to sell my house.  This, on the other hand, could very easily be a tool shed, child's playhouse, or whatever if I move (and of course I would take the oven with me).

I was wondering about moisture and the fibrament stones.  Their FAQ's say:

Quote
Since baking stones are porous they absorb moisture.  Moisture turns to steam at 212F.  If the moisture is forced out of the stone too quickly it can develop cracks.  This is why a slow, gradual temperature increase is so important.

Even if we predried the stone at the factory it would pick up moisture during shipment to you.  To ensure there was a nominal amount of moisture in the stone the predrying process would have to be repeated.

I sent Fibrament an email asking about outdoor storage of their stones and here is the reply I received:

Quote
If you store the baking stone outdoors it must be covered to protect it from the weather. If its stored outside for prolonged periods its best to bring the baking stone up to temperature slowly.

What are everyone's experiences with this?  Do you leave it outside when not in use?  Do you use a cover of some sort?  Do you heat it up slowly?  Have you had any problems with chipped or broken stones?

Also Willard, have you ever thought of selling plans only (or some type of fee based consultation service)?  I have metalworking skills and a metal shop and would love to build one myself.  I don't think your prices for finished units are out of line, or that any major improvements are necessary, but I would like to be able to say "I made that". 

And for the sketches of the kiosk, did you use Sketch Up 100%, or did you draw them in a CAD program and then import them into Sketch Up?  They look really nice.

Offline 2stone

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #188 on: May 05, 2009, 07:01:29 PM »
Hey Tron,

I agree about the kiosk being a good setup for a back yard kitchen, in fact we aim to make a version available in our area for that since we have a huge recreational market by the lake. It is also not practical to have a complete open kitchen in the early spring and late fall around here, and those can be some of the nicest times outdoors since we have hot summers with high humidity.

I think it is best to stick with what the manufacturer recommends regarding the Fibrament stones. On the other hand since I get asked this question a lot, I have taken the liberty to test the whole moisture issue to extremes and have never had a failure yet. In fact I douse the stone all the time while it is hot 700-800 to bring it down 50-100 degrees when I forget and let the oven get too hot. I have told Mark and he says not to do it.....so there you have it. What I can say is the initial curing of the stones is a must, and if you don't do it there is a very high probability that they will explode. I have left my stone uncovered for a year through rain and snow, and I just pre heat a bit slower when I know it has gotten wet.

Don't think we will get into the plan business for the stoves, but I completely understand your desire to build it yourself! On the other hand that may be something for the outdoor kitchens.

I use Xara for graphics, sketchup for 3-D and a cad program by Intergraph called Smartsketch for 2-D scale drawing.
I wish I would have gotten started with Adobe Illustrator for graphics, but that will have to be another day. Xara is a great down and dirty program that is probably the fastest of them all but printers etc. all want Adobe files.

regards,
Willard     
2Stone blog: www.2stoneblog.com

Offline 2stone

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #189 on: June 06, 2009, 10:28:51 PM »
What 1000 kg of Caputo looks like
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Offline 2stone

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #190 on: July 10, 2009, 09:07:28 PM »
Pizza Kiosk's Maiden Voyage,

Here is a link for more pics:  http://2stone.ning.com/profiles/blogs/2stone-norway-the-maiden


Regards,
Willard
« Last Edit: July 10, 2009, 09:10:06 PM by 2stone »
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Offline jeff v

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #191 on: July 10, 2009, 10:00:17 PM »
Willard-that looks great! 160 pies an hour too!

Continued Success,

Jeff

Offline sourdough girl

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #192 on: July 10, 2009, 10:01:03 PM »
Holy Crickey, Willard!

Looks like it was a smashing success!!  Kudos to you!!  May your dreams take you far cause you deserve it!

~sd
Never trust a skinny cook!

Offline 2stone

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #193 on: July 12, 2009, 08:26:38 AM »
Hi Jeff,

They are doing a great job, wish I could have been there myself.
The most important thing is the quality of the product.
We are using a Caputo / whole wheat / rye mix for the crust,
and getting a real good response on it. They tell me they are shooting
for 200 an hour with the four ovens........(no longer a one man job ;-))

Hi sd,

Actually I never did have a dream of ever being in any type of food business.
I have always been baffled by how complicated it all looks!! But like most people
on this forum I love great pizza, and I never seem to get tired of it, since there is
always more to learn. Recently I ran into someone who studied cheese making in France,
and he says once you get the hang of it you can make some "incredible mozzarella"...... he
promised to give me some pointers.........and I know that's no five min deal!!

Hope all is well in Seattle, still one of my favorite places to visit.

regards,
Willard
2Stone blog: www.2stoneblog.com

Offline 2stone

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #194 on: July 12, 2009, 02:42:08 PM »
Some videos

Video 1   http://2stone.ning.com/video/music-festival-norway-2009

« Last Edit: July 12, 2009, 06:18:03 PM by 2stone »
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Offline 2stone

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #195 on: October 08, 2009, 06:57:21 AM »
Commercial Grade 2stone Inferno Pro

The Inferno Pro is designed for indoor or outdoor commercial use, with stainless steel construction and a massive double burner configuration for the ultimate control in high temperature baking. These ovens are built on an industry proven burner chassis that can be configured for both LP and natural gas. They are able to put out over 100,000 BTU's and still remain whisper quiet ..... they are also capable of handling the most grueling production demands with ease (no recovery time)

regards,
willard

« Last Edit: October 08, 2009, 07:00:41 AM by 2stone »
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Offline mmarston

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #196 on: October 08, 2009, 08:37:26 AM »
Nice work Willard. It's been great to see this idea evolve over the past couple of years and I'm thrilled to have one of the first models. You think if I hang on to my 2Stone prototype long enough it will become a collectors item?

Michael
Nobody cares if you can't dance well.  Just get up and dance.  Dave Barry

Offline BurntEdges

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #197 on: October 08, 2009, 10:46:33 AM »
The 2Stone website is not yet posting any information for the Commercial Inferno Pro.   What's the pricetag & features?

Offline 2stone

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #198 on: October 09, 2009, 07:06:01 AM »
Hi Michael,

Thanks, yes I think so....unfortunately I have a habit of not hanging on to much at all....but I did find one of my original pizza contraptions that dated back 12-13 years ago. I may dust it off and post it sometime. For your comfort, even though it has evolved, the inside oven housing and spacing as it relates to the pan and stone is exactly the same as what you have!

BurntEdges,

No not yet, but thought I'd  give you a sneak peak anyway, since this is by far and away the item that has been requested the most. 

regards,
willard
2Stone blog: www.2stoneblog.com

Offline pcampbell

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Re: 2Stone high temperature ovens
« Reply #199 on: October 09, 2009, 09:58:22 AM »
That little kiosk is great.  Why don't we have more stuff like that?   

Could you tell us what/where that is exactly... a fair grounds sort of thing?
Patrick