Author Topic: Conversion of flour  (Read 1342 times)

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Offline Barbarainnc

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Conversion of flour
« on: May 14, 2008, 07:53:01 PM »
The recipe calls for 400 grams of flour, how many cups is this??


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Conversion of flour
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2008, 08:39:49 PM »
The recipe calls for 400 grams of flour, how many cups is this??

Barbarainnc,

What kind and brand of flour do you plan to use? And what size measuring cups do you have at your disposal?

Peter

« Last Edit: May 14, 2008, 08:42:34 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Barbarainnc

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Re: Conversion of flour
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2008, 09:34:33 PM »
King Arthur All-Purpose Flour  Standard Dry Measuring Cups:  1 cup, 1/2 cup, 1/3 cup and 1/4 cup
« Last Edit: May 14, 2008, 09:36:57 PM by Barbarainnc »

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Conversion of flour
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2008, 09:53:33 PM »
Barbarainnc,

Using member November's Mass-Volume Conversion Calculator (the metric option) at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/ and assuming that you are using the Gold Medal all-purpose flour, the answer is 3 c. + 3 T. + 3/4 t. Unfortunately, the King Arthur all-purpose flour is not yet in the database. Even with the Gold Medal all-purpose flour, it has to be measured out in a specific way: 1) the flour in the flour container is first stirred to loosen the flour, 2) the flour is then lifted repeatedly from the flour container into the measuring cup, using either a scoop or a tablespoon, and 3) when the flour is above the level of the measuring cup, it is leveled using a flat edge, such as the flat edge of a knife. When measuring spoons are used, they should be level measurements, not heaping or scant. This is the "textbook" method of measuring out flour. You might come reasonably close to the volume measurements I gave you when using the King Arthur flour. Your recipe may not require absolute precision.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 14, 2013, 06:12:21 PM by Pete-zza »


 

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