Author Topic: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza  (Read 195217 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Akuma

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 4
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #420 on: April 18, 2013, 12:48:41 PM »
Hi Pete,
Thank you so much for directing me to the exact post! :)
Yeah, I didn't use this when I working as a Pizza cook last time.
Cheers,
Akuma


Offline c0mpl3x

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 996
  • Age: 27
  • Location: north of pittsburgh PA
  • crumb bubbles!
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #421 on: April 18, 2013, 02:50:59 PM »
Akuma,

In the U.S., that device is called a dough docker. As I understand it, at Papa John's the use of the dough docker is specified for all of its doughs.

To get an idea as to how dough dockers are used, see this post: Reply 5 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,20742.msg206648/topicseen.html#msg206648.

Peter


pete, i'd like to interject some docker etiquette here for those that may be first reading this

dough dockers only real benefit is the popping of bubbles that will rise and disperse toppings making the pizza less than 'corporate picture perfect', and really have no advantage over hand popping bubbles other than speed.

also, docking the crust is a no-no unless you want a dense crust.   but, some people swear and live by dockers as an everyday tool.  to each their own
Hotdogs kill more people than sharks do, yearly.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21171
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #422 on: April 18, 2013, 03:09:08 PM »
c0mpl3x,

Since you are a former PJ employee who knows whereof he speaks, and knowing of your skills in pizza making, I value your opinion. I often wondered why PJ workers always docked their dough skins. I could see it for cracker-style or other thin style pizzas (like the Chicago thin style) but not for an American style pizza, of which the PJ pizzas are perhaps the best known representation. Since this thread was devoted to trying to replicate the PJ pizza, that is the reason why I docked the PJ clone doughs. Otherwise, I would not have thought to do so. It would be like docking a skin for a NY style pizza. It would be an alien thought that would never occur to me.

Peter

Offline Akuma

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 4
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #423 on: April 18, 2013, 08:51:46 PM »
Hi Pete/c0mpl3x,
I noticed this dough does not rise as much in the middle even without the dockers and my toppings are not dispersed, so does it mean it is not really necessary to use it?
by hand popping, do you mean by the pressing down action while we are pressing out the ring and flatten the surface?
Usually i press out the ring, then i will use knuckles to spread it out slightly before tossing it to get it to size.
thanks
Akuma

Online SquirrelFlight

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 191
  • Age: 41
  • Location: Tigard, OR
  • Who needs nuts?
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #424 on: April 19, 2013, 02:23:51 PM »
In my experiments in making the laminate crust that DNA Dan brought to the forum, I found that docking the dough prevents the resulting pizza from turning into a large puff-pastry.  Sure you could to the same thing with a fork (or something similar); it's just easier with a docker - roll, roll, roll, done!

Offline PalePixie

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #425 on: May 11, 2013, 09:52:01 PM »
This is my first homemade pizza and my family thinks I'm Wonder Woman of the pizza world.   ;D  I'd like to thank Pete-zza for all of the work you've put into cloning the Papa John's.  Wow!  I've been making the 2-day version of the Papa John's clone and we think it's fantastic!   I've made it on the 3rd day and it's still wonderful.  It took me a few times to get the time/temperature perfected in my persnickety oven, but I think I've fine-tuned it.  Here are a few minor modifications I made:

1.  I use canola oil and Dakota Maid bread flour because it's what I have on hand.

2.  I have to use a water temperature of 90 degrees F to get the final dough temperature at about 81 degrees when I take it out of my Bosch Compact mixer.

3.  I've had some problems with getting the dough out of the bowl after it sits out of the fridge to warm up.  It's too soft for me to handle.  I'm guessing this is because I'm using Dakota Maid bread flour instead of King Arthur?   I found that if I put a piece of plastic (sprayed with Pam) on the bottom of the dough bowl and let it extend over the sides, then I can just lift the plastic to get the dough out without wrecking the shape.  Once I have it dusted, it's easy to work with.

4.  I have to use an oven temperature of 475 degrees with the screen on the second lowest rack for 8 minutes, then 1 1/2 minutes at the top rack under the broiler to get the top and bottom just right. (I burned the crust at 500 degrees.)

5.  I'm always two slices of pizza short for my family, so I ordered a 16 inch pizza screen.  I used the calculator to get the following dough ingredient amounts for one 16 inch pie using the 2-day method:

Flour (100%):    463.75 g  |  16.36 oz | 1.02 lbs
Water (56.5%):    262.02 g  |  9.24 oz | 0.58 lbs
IDY (0.28%):    1.3 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.43 tsp | 0.14 tbsp
Salt (01.75%):    8.12 g | 0.29 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.69 tsp | 0.56 tbsp
Canola Oil (7.3%):    33.85 g | 1.19 oz | 0.07 lbs | 7.45 tsp | 2.48 tbsp
Sugar (4.3%):    19.94 g | 0.7 oz | 0.04 lbs | 5 tsp | 1.67 tbsp
Total (170.13%):   788.98 g | 27.83 oz | 1.74 lbs | TF = 0.1384155

Thank you again! 

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8926
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Easy peazzy
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #426 on: May 11, 2013, 10:03:45 PM »
This is my first homemade pizza and my family thinks I'm Wonder Woman of the pizza world.   ;D  I'd like to thank Pete-zza for all of the work you've put into cloning the Papa John's.  Wow!  I've been making the 2-day version of the Papa John's clone and we think it's fantastic!   I've made it on the 3rd day and it's still wonderful.  It took me a few times to get the time/temperature perfected in my persnickety oven, but I think I've fine-tuned it.  Here are a few minor modifications I made:

1.  I use canola oil and Dakota Maid bread flour because it's what I have on hand.

2.  I have to use a water temperature of 90 degrees F to get the final dough temperature at about 81 degrees when I take it out of my Bosch Compact mixer.

3.  I've had some problems with getting the dough out of the bowl after it sits out of the fridge to warm up.  It's too soft for me to handle.  I'm guessing this is because I'm using Dakota Maid bread flour instead of King Arthur?   I found that if I put a piece of plastic (sprayed with Pam) on the bottom of the dough bowl and let it extend over the sides, then I can just lift the plastic to get the dough out without wrecking the shape.  Once I have it dusted, it's easy to work with.

4.  I have to use an oven temperature of 475 degrees with the screen on the second lowest rack for 8 minutes, then 1 1/2 minutes at the top rack under the broiler to get the top and bottom just right. (I burned the crust at 500 degrees.)

5.  I'm always two slices of pizza short for my family, so I ordered a 16 inch pizza screen.  I used the calculator to get the following dough ingredient amounts for one 16 inch pie using the 2-day method:

Flour (100%):    463.75 g  |  16.36 oz | 1.02 lbs
Water (56.5%):    262.02 g  |  9.24 oz | 0.58 lbs
IDY (0.28%):    1.3 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.43 tsp | 0.14 tbsp
Salt (01.75%):    8.12 g | 0.29 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.69 tsp | 0.56 tbsp
Canola Oil (7.3%):    33.85 g | 1.19 oz | 0.07 lbs | 7.45 tsp | 2.48 tbsp
Sugar (4.3%):    19.94 g | 0.7 oz | 0.04 lbs | 5 tsp | 1.67 tbsp
Total (170.13%):   788.98 g | 27.83 oz | 1.74 lbs | TF = 0.1384155

Thank you again! 
.
Sounds like you've done your homework PalePixie. I'm just curious; if you and your family are enjoying your pizzamaking experience, why not get the King Arthur flour and give yourself all the help you can? Not available to you?

Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21171
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #427 on: May 12, 2013, 09:24:36 AM »
PalePixie,

As best I can tell, the Dakota Maid bread flour has a protein content of 12.6% and is milled from spring wheat (https://www.ndmill.com/store/proddetail.cfm?CFID=1098078&CFTOKEN=18772456&ItemID=9&CategoryID=3). As I understand it, the wheat for the Dakota Mills flours is grown in North Dakota. For comparison purposes, the King Arthur bread flour (KABF) has a protein content of 12.7%. And, according to http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/king-arthur-unbleached-bread-flour-5-lb, the KABF is "milled from hard red spring wheat grown chiefly in the Dakotas". Since the Dakota Maid flour is a regional flour, is it possible that you live in the Dakotas somewhere? Either way, you can stick with the Dakota Maid bread flour if you wish, and especially if it is cheaper than the KABF. The Dakota Maid flour also has ascorbic acid, which the KABF does not. You can read about what the ascorbic acid does by looking at that entry in the forum's Pizza Glossary at http://www.pizzamaking.com/pizza_glossary.html#A.

As previously reported, Papa John's uses a proprietary high-protein flour that is milled exclusively for them. I estimate its protein content to be somewhere between 13-13.6%. The dough formulation you used was predicated on a higher protein content, somewhere around 14% (which I believe PJ used several years ago). In your case, if you find that the dough is a bit too wet or damp, you can lower either the hydration value or the amount of oil. Also, for the 16" size pizza you want to make you can use a 26-26.25-ounce dough ball weight in the expanded dough calculating tool or, alternatively, a thickness factor of 0.12992-0.133317. I mention these changes since we discovered some time ago (after I posted the version of the PJ clone dough you used) that PJ was using a slightly smaller dough ball weight than I calculated from my analysis and experiments in my standard electric home oven.

It looks like you found a good way to get the dough out of its storage container. My practice is to remove the dough ball from its storage container as soon as I take it out of the refrigerator. I dip the dough ball into flour and then put it on my work surface and cover it with a sheet of plastic wrap so that a "skin" doesn't form on the dough ball. Using this method, the dough ball tempers faster than if it is kept in the storage container because the storage container (which is usually quite cold) has to warm up before the dough ball can.

I wish you continued good success with your PJ clones.

Peter

Offline jsperk

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 164
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #428 on: May 12, 2013, 09:03:13 PM »
Thanks for the recipes. They always turn out so tasty. Here was my try at same day recipe. I still have a ways to go on my pizza making skills.

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8926
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Easy peazzy
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #429 on: May 12, 2013, 09:06:02 PM »
Thanks for the recipes. They always turn out so tasty. Here was my try at same day recipe. I still have a ways to go on my pizza making skills.
That pizza looks great J...bottom is awesome!  :chef:
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


Offline PalePixie

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #430 on: May 12, 2013, 10:46:04 PM »
I'm just curious; if you and your family are enjoying your pizzamaking experience, why not get the King Arthur flour and give yourself all the help you can? Not available to you?

Bob

I have nothing against King Arthur.  I like using Dakota Maid because it's produced by my family in my back yard. I live in North Dakota.  I would have switched to King Arthur if it would have been necessary. 

Peter: thank you for your suggestions on the weight of the dough for the 16 inch pizza.  You are wealth of information. 

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 8926
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Easy peazzy
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #431 on: May 12, 2013, 11:04:07 PM »
I have nothing against King Arthur.  I like using Dakota Maid because it's produced by my family in my back yard. I live in North Dakota.  I would have switched to King Arthur if it would have been necessary. 

Peter: thank you for your suggestions on the weight of the dough for the 16 inch pizza.  You are wealth of information.
Sorry, perhaps I misunderstood your statement... "I use canola oil and Dakota Maid bread flour because it's what I have on hand."
Didn't know this flower is produced by your family and thus it must always be "on hand".

Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline jsperk

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 164
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #432 on: May 13, 2013, 10:02:57 AM »
That pizza looks great J...bottom is awesome!  :chef:
Thanks Bob. I really like the Emile Henry stone.  Once I get my steel plate cut down to size I will experiment more with that.

Offline pythonic

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1833
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Crest Hill, IL
  • Pizza......its what's for dinner!
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #433 on: June 04, 2013, 10:46:21 AM »
Does anyone know what bake temp and times that Papa Johns uses?  I tried to find the info in this long thread but couldn't find it.

Nate
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21171
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #434 on: June 04, 2013, 12:07:08 PM »
Does anyone know what bake temp and times that Papa Johns uses?  I tried to find the info in this long thread but couldn't find it.

Nate,

See Reply 5 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg58204.html#msg58204. I even found a Wayback Machine link to use as a substitute for the now inoperative tipthepizzaguy link.

Peter

Offline pythonic

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1833
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Crest Hill, IL
  • Pizza......its what's for dinner!
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #435 on: June 04, 2013, 03:53:04 PM »
Thanks Peter.
If you can dodge a wrench you can dodge a ball.

Offline JasonT

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 33
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #436 on: June 12, 2013, 02:04:15 AM »
Pete,

If I wanted to use this dough to make breadsticks, do you have any special tips or modifications to the original recipe?

Also, dumb question, but should I bake them at 500 for 7 mins or no?

Thx Pete.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21171
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #437 on: June 12, 2013, 09:56:24 AM »
JasonT,

Papa John's uses the same dough for its breadsticks as it uses to make its pizzas. However, the amount of dough to use to make the breadsticks depends on the type of breadsticks you want to make. As noted at http://order.papajohns.com/nutrition/2/subMenu.html, Papa John's makes three kinds of breadsticks--the regular Breadsticks, Parmesan Breadsticks and Cheesesticks. For the Breadsticks and Parmesan Breadsticks, PJ uses the same amount of dough, around 20 ounces, as it uses to make its large (14") pizzas. This is confirmed by the PJ Nutrition Facts. For its Cheesesticks, PJ uses the same amount of dough, around 14.5 ounces, as it uses for its medium (12") pizzas. This is also confirmed by the PJ Nutrition Facts.

You should also know that the serving sizes for the three forms of breadsticks and the way they are made are not the same. For example, the PJ Breadsticks and the Parmesan Breadsticks have 10 pieces. The Cheesesticks have 14 pieces, although some PJ stores cut the final product into 16 pieces. The way that the Breadsticks and Parmesan Breadsticks are made can be seen in these YouTube videos:

Papa John's Pizza offers more than just pizza, try a side


Papa John's breadsticks being made


For the Cheesesticks, see this YouTube video:

Bacon Cheesestick Product Showcase.m4v


Since I started this thread, there has been some new information brought to my attention on the PJ dough. I have also revisited the PJ Nutrition Facts and have done some additional analysis as a result. My suggestion at this point is to use the dough formulation at Reply 5 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,25719.msg259461.html#msg259461 for a 14" PJ clone pizza (or for the Breadsticks and Parmesan Breadsticks), and the dough formulation given at Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,25603.msg258178.html#msg258178 for a 12" PJ pizza (or for the Cheesesticks). The two formulations are for a 5-8 day cold fermented dough as was discussed on the first page of this thread. I do not think that the modified formulations as referenced above will produce materially different results than the original version in terms of the crust flavor or texture. Any differences in that respect will be masked by the sauce, cheese and toppings put on the pizza. The crusts will be thinner, however, using the modified formulations. There may also be some flavor and textural differences if the flours suggested in the abovereferenced links to the modified dough formulations are used instead of the KABF.

For those who prefer to use the other modifications of the original formulation set forth in this thread, the other formulations can still be used but they should use the same baker's percents for the oil and sugar (and maybe some minor changes in the hydration values) as noted in the new versions of the dough formulations mentioned above.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21171
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #438 on: June 12, 2013, 10:31:52 AM »
he Special Garlic Sauce is actually quite tasty. In my reading, people often ask how to replicate it. For those who are interested, the ingredients are as follows:

Garlic Sauce: Liquid and Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Water, Salt, Garlic*, Vegetable Mono & Diglycerides, Soy Lecithin, Natural Garlic Flavor, Artificial Flavor [butter], Sodium Benzoate (a preservative), Lactic Acid, Calcium Disodium EDTA added to protect flavor, Beta Carotene (Color).

Many of the ingredients looked familiar to me. For example, the items underlined above are commonly found in soft margarines. Some brands even have the same preservatives or equivalent ones. It might be possible to replicate the Special Garlic Sauce by adding some butter (or imitation butter flavor or possibly some "butter buds"), garlic powder and fresh garlic (finely pureed) to such a basic soft margarine (e.g., Imperial or Parkay soft). It may also be necessary to add some soybean oil to thin out the margarine, depending on the brand.

For those who are interested in the latest research that I have conducted on the PJ Garlic sauce, see the relevant posts starting at Reply 20 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,25603.msg258314.html#msg258314. Maybe the research will encourage some members, especially those who are intimately familiar with the PJ Garlic sauce and have samples to play around with, will use different garlic forms to see if the margarine products (sticks or spreads) sold at retail in supermarkets can be modified to get a final product that is a credible clone of the PJ Garlic sauce.

Peter

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 20237
  • Location: Dutch Country, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #439 on: June 12, 2013, 12:14:27 PM »
For those who are interested in the latest research that I have conducted on the PJ Garlic sauce, see the relevant posts starting at Reply 20 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,25603.msg258314.html#msg258314. Maybe the research will encourage some members, especially those who are intimately familiar with the PJ Garlic sauce and have samples to play around with, will use different garlic forms to see if the margarine products (sticks or spreads) sold at retail in supermarkets can be modified to get a final product that is a credible clone of the PJ Garlic sauce.

Peter


Peter,

I would be interested in playing around to see if I could make a credible clone of the PJ Garlic sauce and also the PJ cheesesticks.  I am not offering any cheesesticks at market right now, so that might be something I could offer if I could make credible clones.  I have to see first if I can obtain some of the PJ Garlic sauce.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!


 

pizzapan