Author Topic: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza  (Read 237984 times)

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #140 on: December 08, 2009, 07:58:22 AM »
Josh,

It's hard to say about the screen you have without knowing more about it and possibly seeing it through a photo. There are some screens that are coated with a nonstick coating with a recommended bake temperature not to exceed about 475 degrees F. You might be close enough to that temperature as not to pose a problem but I can't say for sure without knowing more about your particular screen. I might add that some members have been able to bake PJ clone pizzas on pizza stones without getting excessive bottom crust browning due to the high sugar content of the PJ clone doughs. If you put the pizza stone at the middle oven rack position, you might also be able to bake your pizzas on the stone. The dough with the reduced amount of sugar should be safe on the stone because it is at 4.8%/3 = 1.6%.

I'm not sure how the two dough balls with the reduced sugar level will ferment compared with one with the correct amount of sugar. Usually during the long fermentation time of the basic PJ clone dough there will be conversion of the table sugar to other sugar forms usable as food by the yeast and to contribute to final crust coloration. What I don't know is how much residual sugar will remain in the dough at the time of baking to contribute to final crust coloration. I am pretty certain that the dough and pizza will be OK but the color of the finished crust might be a bit lighter than usual if the residual sugar levels are low. You could cut the fermentation times for the two dough balls with the reduced sugar content, or maybe you can cut the fermentation time short for one of the dough balls and go to full term with the other. That should give you a good comparison and perhaps teach us something.

I, too, have wondered whether there is a required ratio of sugar and yeast to make a PJ clone dough workable. If there is one, I did not find it. I have used high sugar levels with minuscule amounts of yeast (as low as 0.0125% with 4.3% sugar) and ended up with good results.

Peter


Offline torontonian

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #141 on: December 09, 2009, 07:44:53 PM »
I made two pies tonight with the "accidental low sugar" doughs. I let them cold ferment for two days instead of three, but left the dough to rise at room temperature for at least two hours. I also made the PJ clone sauce to go with it. I made the dustinator with flour and corn meal. (I could have sworn I had semolina flour in the cupboard...)

I was quite surprised how much I liked these pies. Fluffier crumb than what I usually make, but very good! I would have taken pics, but alas, the pies were gone in minutes. The screen I have worked fine, and browned nicely on the bottom (not so much on the rim)

I will report back on my findings with the "correct" sugar level pies in a couple of days.

Cheers,
Josh

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #142 on: December 09, 2009, 08:10:35 PM »
Josh,

I'm glad to hear that the low-sugar PJ clone pizzas turned out well. I hope that you will post photos of the pizzas using the remaining dough balls.

Peter

Offline torontonian

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #143 on: December 10, 2009, 06:27:12 PM »
Tonight I baked the remaining two pizzas. These are the ones using the correct amount of sugar.

Very nice. Not nearly as sweet as I was expecting (fearing) given that the last batch were actually quite sweet even with 1/3 the sugar.

Great recipe. Definitely on my regulars list. I can't say how close it is to Papa John's, but I can say it was very good!

-- Josh

Offline torontonian

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #144 on: December 10, 2009, 06:28:14 PM »
More pics. One was pepperoni and bacon, the other just pepperoni.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #145 on: December 10, 2009, 07:07:31 PM »
Josh,

Your pizzas look good, including the nicely blistered rims, and I am happy to see that you liked them. I would say that your pizzas are perhaps as good as ones purchased from Papa John's. The last time I purchased a PJ pizza, I did so on a busy Sunday afternoon at about the time that NFL football games were to start on TV. I intentionally picked that time because I wanted to see how good a pizza PJ could make when being slammed. I saw that the workers, in anticipation of being slammed, had made several skins in advance and had stacked them in racks. The skins had been docked unmercifully, which indicated that the dough balls were being used without adequate warm up time. The pizza I ordered, a simple sausage pizza, was perhaps the worst pizza I bought from PJs since I started this thread. I decided that in the future I will pick my times more carefully when I want one of their pizzas.

From the next to the last photo, I see from the spots of the bottom of the crust that you used what appears to be a perforated disk of some sort. If that is so, it is good to know that disks can be used in lieu of pizza screens. No doubt there are some PJ stores that are using something like what you used.

Did you detect much of a difference between the crusts of the two sets of pizzas and, if so, what were they? And did you prefer one set over the other?

Peter

Offline torontonian

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #146 on: December 10, 2009, 09:20:21 PM »
Hi Peter,

Yes, you're right, I used a perforated disk instead of a screen. I noticed that my screens were 12" instead of 14", so I went with the perforated.

I actually did not notice much of a difference between the crusts in terms of flavor, but if had to pick a winner, it was tonights. I'm not sure if I put it down to the extra sugar in the dough, or to the extra day's ferment. Today's crust did have much better browning.

Thanks again for the recipe.

What process do you go through when "cloning" a dough? I noticed in another clone thread that you hadn't even had the original (Sbarros maybe?)

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #147 on: December 11, 2009, 10:40:25 AM »
What process do you go through when "cloning" a dough? I noticed in another clone thread that you hadn't even had the original (Sbarros maybe?)

Josh,

Throughout this thread, I have discussed most of the steps I took and the type of research I conducted to reverse-engineer and clone the basic Papa John's pizza. But, in general, to successfully reverse-engineer and clone a pizza, particularly the dough and the sauce, you need a lot of data about the pizza. More importantly, however, the data has to be the right kind of data. My favorite data and my favorite starting point is an ingredients list setting forth all of the ingredients in the order of their predominance by weight. Through further research, I can then try to identify as much as possible the nature and sources of those ingredients. Ideally, I would like to use the same ingredients as the pizza operator but quite often the ingredients are either not readily available at the retail level (which means I have to look for or come up with substitutes) or they are proprietary ingredients and formulations that are provided to the pizza operator by a variety of vendors, often to the specs of the operator and on an exclusive basis. I would say that this is almost always true for the large pizza chains, including Papa John's. Using proprietary ingredients and formulations makes it difficult for others to copy their pizzas. Moreover, much of that information, particularly for many of the chains, is not available at the store level, so there is reduced risk of employees divulging that information.

The availability of nutrition information can also be helpful but I have discovered that it is very difficult, at least for me, to be able to reverse engineer a pizza only from nutrition information. The most important nutrition information for my purposes is weight information, if specified (some operators break down a pizza by parts and weights in their published information), or other information from which I might be able to calculate the weights of dough, sauce, cheese or toppings for a particular pizza. I might also be able to divine from the nutrition information whether the dough (or pizza) contains a lot of salt (sodium) or a lot of some other ingredient, or possibly the general type and amount of cheese being used, but to be able to reverse engineer a pizza and get all of the parts in their correct order by weight solely from nutrition information is beyond my skill and ability.

Other tidbits of information can come from former employees. However, in general, I have not found such information to be entirely reliable, either because memories of former employees have faded with the passage of time, or doughs, sauces and other ingredients and formulations have changed over time or have been abandoned. Some information might also come from members who have engaged in dumpster diving. I do not do that personally. In fact, I have read that dumpster diving is against the law in some jurisdictions.

I usually can tell after some basic research and study if I have enough information to proceed with a reverse engineering/cloning exercise. But, no matter how good the information, there are always blanks that I have to fill in. This is usually done by conducting further research on specific items, which can include online research and communicating with product and equipment vendors and even the pizza operators themselves, and by relying on what I know about pizza in general after many years of studying and making pizzas of all types. Since I don't often have an opportunity to sample a target pizza in person, I almost always look for clues from photos and videos of the target pizza at places like YouTube, Google Image, flickr and the websites of the pizza operators themselves. Those sources, coupled with everything else I have been able to learn about a particular pizza, help me zero in on my clone of that pizza and to more faithfully capture the "look and feel" of that pizza. I even count the number of pepperoni slices shown in photos, even though I have discovered that most workers who assemble pizzas do not count the pepperoni slices they put on pizzas.

As you can see, reverse engineering and cloning a pizza is a lot like putting a puzzle together without having all of the pieces, and using your knowledge and experience and sometimes just plain common sense to help complete the puzzle.

Peter

Offline Trogdor33

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #148 on: December 13, 2009, 03:02:44 PM »
Finally got a chance to try this formula out (to be specific, the 2 day dough mentioned on page 2 of this thread). Overall I was very impressed. I lost my patience with the first one and only let it warm up for 20 minutes. The second one (not pictured) I let sit out for 2 hours before baking and it turned out much better (although the first one turned out pretty good, it wasn't great). I also out of habit opened the dough ball with a defined rim, so it doesn't have that flat look as it does in Peter's pictures.
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Offline norma427

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #149 on: December 13, 2009, 03:07:43 PM »
Trogdor33,
Great looking pie.  :)  Your rim looks fine to me.
Norma
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Offline Trogdor33

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #150 on: December 13, 2009, 03:13:59 PM »
Norma,

Thanks for the compliment. The rim looks ok, it just doesn't look like authentic PJ's. The photos Peter posted have the rim the same thickness as the rest of the pie. This dough was way more fun to open up than my NY style though. I was tossing this around like a frisbee and it took the abuse with a smile.

-Joe
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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #151 on: December 13, 2009, 03:25:56 PM »
Joe,

I think you did a terrific job. For some reason, the two-day PJ clone dough seems to be the most popular, perhaps because you don't have to wait five or more days to make the version that is intended to most closely replicate the PJ original pizzas sold in their stores (the one described at Reply 2 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg58197.html#msg58197) .

Technically, the PJ pizzas as made in their stores are intended to have a defined rim. The PJ manual specifically requires it and PJ management will audit stores, especially franchisee stores, to be sure that they are following the manual. The PJ website shows the defined rim, for example, at http://www.papajohns.com/menu/crust_org.shtm, but I have never seen the workers at the PJ store I frequent make a defined rim. Also, a PJ store pizza will usually have some cheese on the rim that burns a bit, just as shown in your photo but not in the PJ photo referenced above. I have never had a PJ store pizza that looks like those shown at the official PJ website. That is one of the reasons why I try to make my PJ clones look more like those I buy from PJs.

Peter

Offline Trogdor33

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #152 on: December 14, 2009, 06:25:27 PM »
Peter,

Thank you for your kind words. Honestly, I was willing to go the 5 days if I needed to. I almost always have dough either in the fridge or on the counter warming up, so I would have just made a 2 day batch of something else and skipped my next regular dough making. Since your comments on the 2 day recipe sounded like there wasn't a noticeable difference, I figured "why wait". I may still try the 5 day formula sometime if I get ambitious, but since you made it sound like they tasted the same I am in no hurry.

I am surprised to find out that the corporate PJ's expects their stores to have a defined rim since all the PJ's pizzas I have seen look more like your pictures than the one on their website. I had a roommate in college that worked at a PJ's and would bring us pizza almost every night to the point where I was almost sick of it. I don't ever recall seeing any sort of rim definition like the one on their website. Then again, I have never seen a big mac or whopper look anything like what you see in the ads. I personally like the flat style crust better on thicker crust pizzas, it was just out of sheer habit that I made the rim on it.

Anyway, thanks for all the time you put into this recipe. It was fun to try a different style for a change.

-Joe
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #153 on: December 14, 2009, 10:24:08 PM »
I am surprised to find out that the corporate PJ's expects their stores to have a defined rim since all the PJ's pizzas I have seen look more like your pictures than the one on their website. I had a roommate in college that worked at a PJ's and would bring us pizza almost every night to the point where I was almost sick of it. I don't ever recall seeing any sort of rim definition like the one on their website.

Joe,

I believe that they refer to the initial formation of the rim as "edge lock". That initial edge lock forms pretty much automatically as a worker starts to make the skin by pressing and pushing the dough outwardly from the center and then partly opening up the skin on the bench by rotating the hands. However, to keep the cheese from going over the edge of the skin as it is being dressed, apparently the rim is supposed to be "double edge locked", as described by a PJ employee at http://www99.epinions.com/review/rest-Chain_Restaurants-All-Papa_John__s_Pizza/rest-review-7B79-1FF2C70-394E8CAF-prod1. Once the skin is fully opened up, presumably it can then be placed on a pizza screen. I suppose the double edge lock might also be done on the pizza screen itself. In fact, if you look at the YouTube video at , I believe that is the method used by the PJ worker in that video.

A member of the PMQ Think Tank, in a post at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7980&p=55053#p55016, reported that she failed an evaluation at a PJ franchisee location because she failed on "edge lock, sauce lock, and cheese lock." I don't know what sauce lock and cheese lock are, but they are apparently other steps that workers are supposed to follow.

Peter

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #154 on: December 20, 2009, 04:35:28 PM »
Recently, I decided to conduct an experiment in which I took member Randy’s interpretation (if that is a proper characterization) of the Papa John’s style and reformated it to fit the “look and feel” of the Papa John’s clone doughs/pizzas that I have made and reported on in this thread. For purposes of the experiment, I started out with Randy’s basic dough formulation as given at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5721.0.html. As part of the transformation, I used the same pizza size (14”), same dough ball weight (22 ounces), same weight of mozzarella cheese (about 9 ounces, but diced rather than shredded), the same sauce weight (about 5.5 ounces of a PJ clone sauce), and the same number of slices of pepperoni (around 45 slices) as I used for many of my PJ clones as reported in this thread. I used the same baker’s percents for my dough as called for in Randy’s recipe, and I used the same dough preparation procedures, except that I used a combination of King Arthur bread flour and vital wheat gluten (Hodgson Mill brand) instead of high-gluten flour and I used a water temperature of 90 degrees F (as recommended by Randy) since I was planning on making a two-day cold fermented dough rather than a one-day cold fermented dough. I also tweaked the baker’s percents to reflect better conversion data than I previously used with Randy’s recipe.

The dough preparation was easy, although I found it necessary to use a spatula from time to time to help the dough along at the different stages. The finished dough was in very good form—smooth and supple. By the time I removed the dough ball from the refrigerator (after two days), it had more than quadruped in volume (based on using the poppy seed method as described at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6914.0.html). The dough was allowed to warm up at room temperature for about 2 ˝ hours. I used Randy’s version of the PJ “Dustinator” blend as I opened up and shaped the dough ball to the desired size (14”). That blend included white flour, semolina flour and cornmeal (the official PJ Dustinator blend comprises white flour, semolina flour and soybean oil). I had no problem shaping the dough ball to form the 14” skin and to fit it on my 14” pizza screen. I did not need and therefore did not use a dough docker. The finished dressed (unbaked) pizza weighed around 39 ounces, which was pretty much in line with many of my PJ clones.

The pizza was baked on the lowest oven rack position of my electric oven, which I had preheated to about 500 degrees F (the temperature suggested by Randy). The total bake time was around 10 minutes, with the final minute at the topmost oven rack position to get more top crust coloration. The bake time was considerably longer, by several minutes, than what Randy has used and what I have normally used for PJ clones. The weight of the pizza after baking was around 36 ounces, which reflected a loss during baking of about 8%. That figure was also in line with some of my prior PJ clone experiments. Overall, I believe I achieved the general look and feel of the PJ clones I have been making, which was the objective of the experiment.

The photos below show the finished pizza. I must say that I was quite surprised by the results. From a weight standpoint, the pizza was similar to the many PJ clones I have made, including the two-day version, but there were many differences. First, the rim of the baked pizza was larger and puffier than my PJ clone pizzas even though I was careful in forming the skin to press the rim area down hard so as to materially reduce the finished rim size. I attribute the larger rim size to the large amount of yeast (1.56% IDY) in the dough formulation I used. Second, the crumb was considerably softer, “pastier” and more tender and less chewy than my PJ clones, and more breadlike, with a softer, less crispy bottom crust. I attribute this to the considerably higher formula hydration (nominally 60.63% but a bit more than 64% when the water in the honey is accounted for) and the considerably more total sugar (5.27% table sugar and 4.63% honey, for a total of about 9.9%) than what I have used (a bit over 4%) for my PJ clones. In my clones, I use less sugar (or honey) and more oil than Randy calls for in his recipe. Surprisingly, I did not find the crust to be overly sweet but the crust was saltier than my PJ clones (the formula salt in the recipe is 2.46%).

The flavors of the pizza were quite good and similar to what I have achieved with my PJ clones but the total mouth feel was quite different than my PJ clones because of the increased crust/crumb softness. In retrospect, it occurred to me that I might have been able to reduce the crust and crumb softness and to get a chewier and crispier crust by using a lower bake temperature and a longer bake time in order to drive off more of the moisture in the dough so that the final crust would approach the textural qualities of the finished crusts of the PJ clones I have made (and authentic PJ pizzas as well). However, that would have meant a possible total bake time in a range of 12-15 minutes by my estimation. That said, I am sure that I can improve the textural qualities for the leftover slices when I reheat them in my toaster oven.

Overall, I learned a lot from my experiment and I am glad I did it. However, I concluded that it is perhaps better to stick with Randy’s recipe on its own rather than trying to reformat it to fit the profile of the PJ clones I have been making. Alternatively, for me, a good option is to make “thinner” versions of Randy’s American style, which is where I originally cut my teeth with Randy’s recipe, and which I described in various forms at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1707.0.html.

Peter
« Last Edit: September 09, 2013, 04:26:15 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline LizzieTheChef

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #155 on: March 25, 2010, 07:13:56 PM »
When cooking on a screen with this PJ clone recipe, should I leave the pizza stone in and place the screen on top of the the stone? Or remove the stone so that the pizza is on the rack above the element? I am going to try this recipe again, I think the last time I placed it on top of the stone with a screen and it cooked unevenly (crust cooked too quickly). I can't remember too clearly though, almost all my pizzas have been baked on the stone since I got it :p

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #156 on: March 25, 2010, 07:27:50 PM »
When cooking on a screen with this PJ clone recipe, should I leave the pizza stone in and place the screen on top of the the stone? Or remove the stone so that the pizza is on the rack above the element? I am going to try this recipe again, I think the last time I placed it on top of the stone with a screen and it cooked unevenly (crust cooked too quickly). I can't remember too clearly though, almost all my pizzas have been baked on the stone since I got it :p

The PJ clones are intended to be baked on screens only, as they are in PJ stores. All of my clones discussed in this thread were baked on screens only. So, no pizza stone should be used. However, there are some members who have baked their PJ clone pizzas on stones. But, because of the high sugar content of the dough, you have to be careful that the bottom of the pizza doesn't burn or turn brown prematurely before the top of the pizza is finished baking.

Peter

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #157 on: March 26, 2010, 09:23:08 PM »
Here is my first attempt at Petezza's PJ Pizza.  I also used his recipe for the sauce as well.  The recipe for the saucecan be found here. http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6633.20.html

First off, my hat is off to Peter for all the research, experimentation, and sharing of his recipe and method.  I haven't eaten a PJ's pizza in awhile, but this was very close.  I would have like the crust to have a bit more chew, but I suspect the difference is in the protein % of their flour and my BF. 

My BF is bought from Sunflower Health Food Market and I didn't look at the label for protein content when buying it in bulk.  It is surely lower than PJ's flour though.

Next, I used Pete's recipe on the first page and multiplied by a factor of 1.5 to make a 2 (12") pizzas. 
Also use 45gm of my starter and up the ADY to 1.5 tsp to be used in 24hours.

Here's the recipe I ended up with.
•   Flour      531.6gm
•   Water      300.39gm
•   IDY      1.5 tsp
•   Salt      9.3gm (1.5 tsp)
•   Veg oil      38.8gm (2.85 T)
•   Sugar      25.5gm (2.1 T)
•   Total      914.59
I originally wasn't going to add starter but decided at the last min. to add it.  My final dough weight was 932gm and each doughball was 466gm.

I mixed all the ingredients in the food processor and let it rest for 10min prior to kneading.  I finished kneading by hand on the counter for a min or so.  The doughballs were lightly oiled and plated and loosley covered with a sheet of plastic wrap.  At the 24 hour mark, the balls looked as though they had risen about 60-70% (not quite doubled) in the fridge.
  They were proofed at room temps for 2 hours prior to stretching and baking.  The dough temp at the time of stretching was 67F and felt cool to the touch.  The dough had a really nice feel to it and stretched rather easily.  I could toss this one in the air.  Also didn't have much of a spring back and retained it's shape easily.

I baked 2 pies.  A white chicken alfredo pie (for the wife and SIL) and a mushroom pepperoni pizza for me and the BIL.

OK now for the funny story.  My BIL took a bite and said, "Wow, this is very restaurant quality!"  To which I replied, it's suppose to be a clone of one of the chains.

He takes another bite (the crust this time) and said, "Is it Papa John's?"  to which I replied with a big grin and said "yes.."

He said, you know I was wondering that b/c when I first looked at it, I thought it looked a lot like a PJ's pie.
So there ya have it.  GREAT recipe PETE!!!  :chef:
« Last Edit: March 26, 2010, 09:27:12 PM by Tranman »

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #158 on: March 26, 2010, 09:56:50 PM »
Tran,

I'm glad that everyone liked your pizzas. The one you showed in th photos looks terrific. Since Papa John's doesn't make a one-day dough for its pizzas, your pizza crusts shouldn't be the same but you can still capture the "look and feel" of a real PJ pizza. It was also good to see that a grill can be used to bake the pizzas.

No doubt you saw my 24-hour PJ clone dough version at Reply 31 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg60076.html#msg60076. Out of curiosity, I ran your basic numbers (two 12" pizzas) through the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html and, for two 12" pizzas using ADY instead of IDY, I came up with about 3/4 teaspoon of ADY. The dough ball weight was 465.1 grams, or almost exactly what you used (466 grams).

Peter


Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #159 on: March 26, 2010, 10:45:41 PM »
Pete I did see that recipe along with countless others as I read as much as I could from the forum last night.  It was getting late and I needed to start a formula, so I went back to the original and just made a wild gestimation at how much dough I would need.  I'm very surprise that the final dough weight came so close to your calculations. 

I'll revise the recipe I have saved on my laptop to reflect the new amount of ADY I should be using but I do want to mention that the amount that I did use worked out fine.  I really didn't know how much ADY to add but based on my past (& misguided) efforts of using 1/2 tsp ADY and 15gm starter per 300gm of dough, I decided to go with 45gm starter and 1.5tsp per ~900gm dough weight. 
  Do you think 45gm of starter plus ADY was too much for a total dough weight of 932gm (2 - 12" pies)?
Pies turned out awesome so I'm a bit hesitant to change anything. 

I usually use about 275-300gm per 12" NY pie, so when these came up at 466gm per 12" pie, I was a bit nervous that they would be way too thick.  But they came out just right!. 

Anyways, I did want to mention the garlic butter sauce again as it was excellent.  I haven't tested it side by side with a PJ's tub of garlic butter, but it definitely hit the spot.   Easy to make as well.  Softened butter with finely minched garlice or garlic powder.  Then gradually mix in olive oil until desired consistency.  A very small pinch of salt as well and it stays liquid at room temps. 

BTW, not only does the Primo grill make an awesome pizza, but it also has an authentic WFO taste to it.  Very noticeably different than pies baked in my indoor oven. 
« Last Edit: March 26, 2010, 10:49:11 PM by Tranman »


 

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