Author Topic: starter sourness  (Read 6652 times)

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Offline MWTC

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Re: starter sourness
« Reply #20 on: August 29, 2008, 05:48:13 PM »
Bill/SFNM,

You probally have addressed this question before, but would you tell me if you have tried the bulk ferment for 18  hours, then balling it up and allowing it to continue to ferment for the additional 6 hours before the bake. If you have, what were your conclusions, seeing that you are not doing it per your above response.

Also, is the water temperature room temperature or are you doing someting different?

MWTC  :chef:


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: starter sourness
« Reply #21 on: August 29, 2008, 07:28:30 PM »
Bill/SFNM,

You probally have addressed this question before, but would you tell me if you have tried the bulk ferment for 18  hours, then balling it up and allowing it to continue to ferment for the additional 6 hours before the bake. If you have, what were your conclusions, seeing that you are not doing it per your above response.

Also, is the water temperature room temperature or are you doing someting different?

MWTC,

Sorry, I must be having a senior moment. What response above has me doing something other than what you ask about?

Bill/SFNM

Offline MWTC

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Re: starter sourness
« Reply #22 on: August 29, 2008, 11:15:55 PM »


100% Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour (including flour in starter)
62% water (including water in starter)
3% salt
starter as described above. (starter is 54% flour)

use these numbers in this site's dough calculator to get actual ingredient weights.

Ferment proof 1-2 days

Bake 45-60 seconds.



Maybe I assumed wrong from the above referenced quote.

MWTC  :chef:
« Last Edit: August 29, 2008, 11:18:59 PM by MWTC »

Offline Pizza Rustica

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Re: starter sourness
« Reply #23 on: August 30, 2008, 09:02:10 PM »
Scott/Bill

Thanks for the suggestions. I did a wash, per Ed Wood's book 1/2 cup starter and warm water to top of container. Thereafter let it rise, fed it and what a difference. I think my problem is I tend to take it out of the refrigerator and let it warm up, then do a feeding, but sometimes due to work/family I leave it out on the counter too long and this contributes perhaps to the acidity level.

Bill, it sounds like your thermoKool is a great device. How long do you typically put the starter into the ThermoKool to activate it? Could you explain the process.

I have some Caputo going now and hope to try out my improved starter tomorrow night. thanks.
Russ

Offline DomeZone

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Re: starter sourness
« Reply #24 on: August 31, 2008, 10:53:56 AM »
For what it's worth, I've been baking Sourdough breads for close to 30 yrs now.
Think of your starter as your yeast maker, it's main purpose is to rise the bread.
The more sourer the starter is the less it will rise the bread because you have let the yeast die out and let
the sourering stuff take over (hope that makes sense).
What you want is a very fresh starter, fed to the point that it will double it's self in 4 hrs.
then add this yeast fill starter to your mixture of Flour and water to ferment, the longer "this" sets is where
your sour flavor gets going, of course the trade off for sour is less rise, so look for your balance.
In pizzas you may not need alot of rising power.

Mike


 

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