Author Topic: My NY  (Read 10269 times)

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addicted

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My NY
« on: December 03, 2004, 10:43:28 PM »
After lurking for a while, I thought I would post a pic.
This is my favorite pie.


addicted

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Re:My NY
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2004, 10:45:02 PM »
more

addicted

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Re:My NY
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2004, 10:46:04 PM »
more

Offline canadave

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Re:My NY
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2004, 11:26:38 PM »
Wow....looks great! Recipe?..... ;)

Offline Foccaciaman

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Re:My NY
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2004, 01:09:06 AM »
looks very good, I especially like the look of the crust.

Yes, please share your recipe......... ;D
Ahhh, Pizza The Fifth Food Group

addicted

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Re:My NY
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2004, 06:05:03 PM »
I have been making pizza for a few years now as a hobby at least twice a week. My recipe is unorthodox from everything else I have read here , and all the books I have read. I have taken the best recipes and pointers and came up with this fairly quick and easy recipe which I now use exclusively. This dough gives a a thin crisp outer crust with nice moist inner crust with a good chew and alot of flavor. Here we go:

Ingredients:
3 cups Stone-Buhr unbleached white bread flour
1.5 tsp Kosher salt
1 Tbls honey
1/2 tsp saf yeast
1 tsp olive oil
1 cup ROOM TEMERATURE water

1)Place the yeast in the kitchen-aid mixer bowl. Add the honey with the water. hand whisk and let sit for ten minutes.

2)In a seperate bowl, mix the flour and the salt.

3) Pour the flour mixture into the mixer, put on the dough hook , and mix slowly scraping the sides with a spatula if neccessary until the flour forms a ball. Turn off the machine and let the dough rest 5 minutes.

4)Now for the unorthodox part that gives this dough a great crust in a short time. Place a measuring cup full of water in the microwave until it boils and steams up the microwave.

5)add the tsp of oil to the dough and mix for ten minutes until the dough is nice and smooth and elastic.

6)place the dough ball in an oiled metal bowl, DO NOT COVER and place in the warm moist microwave until the dough doubles in bulk, about 2 hours.

7)Heat the oven to 425 and place your stone wherever it works best.

8) after the dough has risen, flour your hands and cut the dough in two equal pieces. Take each piece of doughplace in your hands and form two mushroom-like balls with them. Place them on a lightly floured plate and let rest for 20 min.

9) Flour your peel, shape your crusts, apply your sauce and toppings and bake until done.( about 8 mins ).

A few things here the die-hards will notice.

1) I dont us a lot of oil and I don't mix it until the ball forms.  In my experience oil makes the dough heavy and lifeless so I use very little.

2) I do not let the dough rise in the refrigerator. I did this for years, and  It does make the dough easier to handle , but I also think part of a great dough is letting the yeast work in a warm, humid enviroment not a cold dry one.

3) I also do not use high gluten flour. It is just too much of a hassle to get. The Stone-Buhr bread flour works great and is also consistent.

Let me hear some opinions.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re:My NY
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2004, 07:09:38 PM »
addicted,

Thanks for sharing your recipe.

When I used to make pizza dough for same day consumption, I often used the microwave approach you describe.  I would use the microwave to bring a 4-cup Pyrex measuring cup filled with water to a boil, and then put the dough (in its own bowl) into the microwave along with the water in the Pyrex measuring cup.  If it was cold in my kitchen, I sometimes had to repeat the cycle a second time.  This approach created a "proofing box" effect, although I didn't think of it as such at the time.  Alternative approaches I used were to put a bowl of dough into a larger container (metal) filled with hot (but not boiling) water, or to preheat and turn off the oven and put the bowl of dough into the oven to rise.  These were all tips that I had read about along the way.

When I have a chance, I plan to try out your recipe as you have recited it.  The Stone Buhr bread flour is a West Coast product, but I assume a King Arthur bread flour or a Giusto bread flour, both of which I happen to have on hand, should be reasonable substitutes.  You indicate that you use SAF yeast.  Since you proof your yeast in water, I assume it is the active dry yeast form.  Is that correct?   Since Kosher salt varies in coarseness from brand to brand, can you tell us which brand you use?

Just looking at the ingredients for your recipe, they strike me as being quite similar to a NY style dough but for the use of the bread flour instead of high-gluten flour, a fair amount of honey and not using a period of refrigeration.  When I try the recipe, I plan to weigh the ingredients and try to calculate the baker's percents as best I can.  You indicate that the dough is sufficient for two pizzas.  For the amount of flour and water in your recipe, I would guess a dough ball weight of a bit over 22 oz.  If you are making two pizzas, how big (diameter) and how thin are they?

Peter


adicted

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Re:My NY
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2004, 07:50:04 PM »
 Thanks for the response.
 High gluten flour will work fine.
 Yes I use SAF active dry yeast.
 This makes two 16" pies with the border a 1/2" thick and the middle about an 1/8" thick.
 I use the honey to proof the yeast as well as give the crust a good coloring with a nice flavor.
The Kosher salt is Morton's.

I form this crust by pressing the middle first, forming the border with my thumbs, and lightly stretching over the knuckles. If the dough does not want to stretch ,let it rest for a minute then resume.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re:My NY
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2004, 08:48:54 PM »
addicted,

A follow-up question.

In searching the Stone-Buhr flour, I see that the Stone-Buhr "all-purpose" flour has a protein content of 12.3%.  The KA "bread" flour has 12.7%.  I did not find a Stone-Buhr so-called "bread" flour anywhere in the search I conducted, so I take this to mean that the Stone-Buhr all-purpose flour has a protein content that is actually closer to bread flour than what is usually considered all-purpose flour.  Is that your understanding also?  

Peter

Offline addicted

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Re:My NY
« Reply #9 on: December 05, 2004, 09:21:00 PM »
here ya go........
Well....okay,then.


Offline addicted

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Re:My NY
« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2004, 09:21:51 PM »
another
Well....okay,then.

Offline Randy

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Re:My NY
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2004, 07:00:38 AM »
high gluten flour and an overnight rise in the cooler will give you a whole new taste.  Give it a try.

Randy


Offline tsmys

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Re: My NY
« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2009, 01:01:29 PM »
OK, did you, Pete, or anyone else ever try this formula.  I needed a dough to make lunch for a friend today and thought this sounded easy enough.  Turned out to be the worst pizza I've made to date.  Dough was much too dry and very hard to work with.  Unfortunately I didn't have the time to stretch it a little and let it rest a while.  Ended up using a rolling pin to get it stretched out as much as I could and just hoped for the best.  Is it me or is this formula way under hydrated?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: My NY
« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2009, 03:22:34 PM »
tsmys,

No, I never did get around to trying the recipe. That recipe is an "emergency" type of recipe, which is a type that I don't often make because I am more of a fan of longer-fermented doughs. I suspect also that I held back from making the dough because I do not have a source of the Stone-Buhr flour, which is a regional flour that is not available where I live outside of Dallas. The Stone-Buhr flour is also a somewhat unique flour because it is called an all-purpose flour but has a protein content closer to that of a bread flour.

In your case, it is possible that you measured out the flour with a "heavier" hand than addicted uses, which could have easily affected the hydration of the dough. That would not be uncommon for a recipe where the flour is specified by volume rather than weight and without an indication of how the flour should be measured out. If you did not use the Stone-Buhr flour, that could also have affected the results because of different hydration characteristics.

As a convenience to our members, I recently compiled a list of "emergency" type dough recipes at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8297.0.html. Emergency type doughs are the easiest and quickest doughs to make but in my opinion are usually not the best from a quality standpoint simply because of the short fermentation times. I have not personally tried all of the recipes in that collection, for the reason mentioned above, but I thought that the Y-TOWN recipe (under the General category) was a good all-purpose emergency dough recipe. Steve's Quick & Easy recipe (under the New York Style category) is also a good one but it requires high-gluten flour, a food processor, and is a very high hydration dough that some people may have difficulties working with. For an American style emergency dough, I think that the Papa John's emergency dough clone recipe (under the American style category) is a good one for that style. That recipe was my creation so I may be biased on its value. You might want to experiment with some of the emergency dough recipes in the collection to find the one that works best for you and that you feel comfortable with to use to make pizzas to serve your guests.

Peter


Offline tsmys

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Re: My NY
« Reply #14 on: April 20, 2009, 06:34:58 PM »
Thanks for the quick reply.  I have to agree with you on the longer fermentation.  Even with my limited experience, it is obvious that longer is better.  There was really no special reason why I picked this recipe over the others in the "emergency" thread, I guess I'm just a lousy gambler!  The next time I'm in that situation, I'll try your recipe.  Thanks again for the help :)

Offline esoog

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Re: My NY
« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2010, 09:41:29 AM »
tried this recipe dough (see newbie thread) but with 00 flour. Great results and a fantastic tasting pie! although very crispy I will post up a day cold fermentation one later today so you can see a comparison.

Offline esoog

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Re: My NY
« Reply #16 on: October 18, 2010, 07:44:07 AM »
this is one day cold fermentation. The base i find is far too jaw breaking chewy. This was over cooked in the oven at 500F for 15 mins on a screen throughout. Not sure whether i was using 00 flour made the difference to the extra chewyness. the base did however cook better and was softer than previous although overcooked. The taste of honey etc does make this a very nice tasting pie im going to try another recipe with longer fermentation and one that handles similarly to this because it was a great dough to shape with my newbie skills.

Offline chickenparm

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Re: My NY
« Reply #17 on: October 18, 2010, 10:17:14 PM »
Impressive....most Impressive.
 ;D

-Bill

Offline esoog

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Re: My NY
« Reply #18 on: October 20, 2010, 06:49:10 PM »
thank you means a lot .......will be testing a couple of more pies this weekend i really cant wait!

Offline sconosciuto

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Re: My NY
« Reply #19 on: October 20, 2010, 07:14:37 PM »
Hi esoog,

Nice looking pie.  Makes me want to go out and buy some fresh jalapenos to put on my pie.

Any particular reason for using the type 00 flour?  At lower temperatures (500-750F) you probably won't see any benefit from using this sort of flour and actually will have a negative effect.  You are better off sticking with bread flour, all-purpose or high gluten flour.  Only my opinion of course.


 

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