Author Topic: 6-hour dough  (Read 2156 times)

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Offline Essen1

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6-hour dough
« on: July 04, 2008, 12:33:33 PM »
It was a mini project I involved myself in yesterday, combined with a craving for some pizza. Anyway, I wanted to see if it was possible to make a decent, flavorful dough for the same evening, using a starter. To my surprise, the dough and the end result turned out quite good, actually.

I made three pies last night and saved one for today. All four dough balls had a weight of 300 gr. for a 14” skin. The rest of the dough (128 gr.) went into a clean container for further fermentation and to use as a base for a new biga. The flour was 100% KABF, which I haven’t use on its own in a long time. Usually I use some sort of flour mix or 100% Caputo Pizzeria. As a matter of fact, another batch I made on Tuesday with 100% Caputo is still on a cold rise in my fridge.

The dough felt very wet, even at only a 60% hydration and a 5-hour counter rise. Its manageability was very good though. No tearing and it were easily shaped into three 14” skins. However, during the counter-rise the dough had to be punched down twice because it expanded far beyond the bowl’s limits. I’m sure some of you cringed at the thought of punching down the dough. It’s not what I usually do but the dough reminded me of the creature in the classic movie “The Blob”. It was a traumatizing and frightening experience!  ;D

Well, with the LBE up to 685 F I slid the first pizza in, an all veggie pie, which one of my neighbors requested. It was topped with spinach, mushrooms & black olives. The sauce was a 50/50 mix between 6 in 1 and hand-crushed San Marzanos (seeds left in), enhanced with a minimal amount of dried, hand-crushed basil and oregano, a dash of onion and garlic powder and some kosher salt. The cheese was a Precious brand fresh, whole-milk mozzarella. I tore the cheese apart into smaller pieces, lined a bowl with a paper towel and let it sit for at least an hour to drain excess moisture.

The second one was a Pizza Tonno w/mushrooms. As you can see, the LBE got a little too hot – it went up to 750 F while I was prepping the skin - and burned the rim a bit too much for my taste, even though I turned the pizza three times. I’m still trying to balance baking times and temperatures ever since I replaced the grilling grate in the LBE with a solid metal plate.

For the third, a spinach/ham combo, I reduced the temp back down 700 F and it turned out nicely, although the rim’s still a bit too charred, I think.

On all three pizze, the oven spring was surprisingly good, the crust had a nice texture and balance between being crunchy and chewy and the flavor was slightly on the sour side without being overpowering. In the photos it might look like I was going nuts with the toppings but all three pies were topped lightly and dusted with some aged Pecorino Romano cheese.

Overall, I was pretty satisfied with the texture, flavor and consistency of the crust albeit it was only a 6-hour dough. I think the formula is worth experimenting with, especially when there’s a need for an “emergency” dough. I’m also wondering how it would turn out when baked in a real WFO.

The stats:

771 gr. KABF (100%)
463 gr. Water  (60%)
18 gr. Kosher salt (2.33%)
8 gr.   Olive oil (1.03%)
2 gr. ADY (.25%)
66 gr. Starter (8.5%)

Pics are not the best but give you an idea of the outcome…


« Last Edit: July 04, 2008, 01:01:54 PM by Essen1 »
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/


Offline Essen1

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Re: 6-hour dough
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2008, 12:34:24 PM »
The rest...

Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: 6-hour dough
« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2008, 02:26:14 PM »
Essen:

Danke! :chef:

Those are some mighty fine looking pizzas!  :pizza::D :pizza:

If you don't mind me asking, what do you use in making your starter?

Auf Wiedersehen  ;D
Let them eat pizza.

Offline Essen1

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Re: 6-hour dough
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2008, 02:47:54 PM »
ME,

Einen fröhlichen Fourth, first of all.

The way I made this starter, around three weeks ago, was I dissolved a cube of fresh yeast in 1 1/2 cups of lukewarm water, added a cup of KABF, whisked it until smooth and then just let it sit on my window sill with the lid slightly ajar. I fed it every other day with 1/2 cup KABF and 1/4 cup water.

Tschüss.  :)

Mike

Edit: I forgot to mention that I fed it for about a week and then simply let it sit at the window, punched a couple of holes in the lid, closed it and let it develop. It had a great sour smell to it and a nice build-up of hooch before I activated it again a couple of days ago.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2008, 03:11:10 PM by Essen1 »
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: 6-hour dough
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2008, 06:01:03 PM »
Mike:

Great!

Thanks again! ;D
Let them eat pizza.

Offline andreguidon

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Re: 6-hour dough
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2008, 10:00:35 AM »
Hi Mike !

can u give us more details about the starter making ?

thanks !

great looking pies !!!
"Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication." Leonardo da Vinci

Offline Arj

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Re: 6-hour dough
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2008, 10:32:11 AM »
Hi there!
It seems great! But I want to ask you something: what kind of flour you have used? I suppose a weak one, because the gluten developped well, if not I suggest you to try the weakest one.

forgive my horrible english :-D

Arj

Offline Essen1

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Re: 6-hour dough
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2008, 11:59:16 AM »
Andre,

I'd love to give you more detail but honestly, what I described above was the entire procedure. Very simple and perhaps unconventional but I got a nice result.

Arj,

I used Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour.
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Arj

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Re: 6-hour dough
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2008, 04:03:45 AM »
Ok, It seems a good one for me!

But I have to ask you something: why "00"? The differences between flours are small but very important. I am sure that the dough with flour "0" is better than the one with "00"....This one it's good for cakes, pastry,and any other thing you can find in "pasticceria"(sorry but I'm sure you understand, I don't know the word in english.... :'().....the flours are different, and there are 5 categories: from flour number 2 to 00. The no 00 is the most white flour you can find. The 0 is correct for pizza, it's a little cheaper one, and has more gluten, protein and any other thing. Simply, is better!
When you find a 00 flour, you must know that this flour is white because is  passed more time by the miller. With a cake you need a white white white flour, whith pizza and bread you don't.  8)


 

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