Author Topic: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls  (Read 9322 times)

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Offline pythonic

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #25 on: January 28, 2014, 06:36:21 PM »
Pepperoni rolls came out very good.  They were different than the pillsbury dough...but good.  Flavor was similar, but one major difference was the amount of puff in the Pillsbury is greater...perhaps I'll add some baking powder to the recipe.  I also think I can detect the difference between the olive oil, and the shortening...and prefer the shortening in this type.  So, next try will be with some baking powder and shortening.  Seemed to me like we were pretty close with our estimates of total dough ball, and hydration.  Here are the pics from last weekends attempt:

Maybe you need to let the dough proof (rise like bread) after making your rolls.  That give you better oven spring.
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Offline Killmeyer000

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #26 on: March 04, 2014, 02:06:34 PM »
Sorry...I got busy at work, and didn't have time to respond with the results.

But, I did try this one:

Flour/VWG Blend* (100%):
Water (55%):
Salt (2%):
Sugar (8.8%):
Bob's Red Mill Xanthan Gum (2%):
Crisco Vegetable Shortening (5.4%):
Arm & Hammer Baking Soda (0.6%):
Glucono-delta Lactone (GdL) (1.3%):
Total (175.1%):
 226.07 g  |  7.97 oz | 0.5 lbs
124.34 g  |  4.39 oz | 0.27 lbs
4.52 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.81 tsp | 0.27 tbsp
19.89 g | 0.7 oz | 0.04 lbs | 4.99 tsp | 1.66 tbsp
4.52 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.51 tsp
12.21 g | 0.43 oz | 0.03 lbs | 3.4 tsp | 1.2 tbsp
1.36 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.28 tsp
2.94 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.59 tsp
395.85 g | 13.96 oz | 0.87 lbs | TF = N/A

It was a pretty big failure for me.  I probably did something wrong. 

First thing I noticed was that the dough was extremely dry...like biscuit dough.  I'm not used to working with crisco...and I am used to working with olive oil which might give a more wet feel.

I first tried to put this dough in my Bosch mixer...but, it was so dry, that it just slid around in the mixer and didn't get pulled like it should.

I thought I might work the dough by hand...but decided to add some water to raise the hydration.  I mathmatically figured the amound to get to 65% hydration.  This made the dough sticky enough to get pulled in the mixer.

After mixing for 6 minutes, I placed the dough in the fridge for a few days...and then let it proof at room temperature for a few hours.  The dough never raised at all.  I thought maybe it would rise in the oven...but that didn't happen either.  The baked dough mostly resembled a cracker.

I recently made the pepperoni rolls with pillsbury dough again...and realized that the first try we made using yeast was pretty close for me.  I also noticed that the pillsbury dough is pretty wet...maybe wetter than the 55% we guessed on earlier.  I think I'd like to try a version that uses yeast like this:

KABF (100%):
Water (55%):
IDY (0.25%):
Salt (2%):
Sugar (8.7%):
Olive Oil (5.3%):
Total (171.25%):
 227.74 g  |  8.03 oz | 0.5 lbs
125.26 g  |  4.42 oz | 0.28 lbs
0.57 g | 0.02 oz | 0 lbs | 0.19 tsp | 0.06 tbsp
4.55 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.82 tsp | 0.27 tbsp
19.81 g | 0.7 oz | 0.04 lbs | 4.97 tsp | 1.66 tbsp
12.07 g | 0.43 oz | 0.03 lbs | 3.02 tsp | 1.01 tbsp
390 g | 13.76 oz | 0.86 lbs | TF = N/A

But is closer to 65% hydration...and has some added baking powder...and possibly a little xanthan gum for the heck of it. 

Offline lupin05

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #27 on: March 18, 2016, 10:44:55 PM »
John,

I did some calculations and used the expanded dough calculator at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html to come up with the dough formulation set forth below.

By way of background and explanation of what I did, you will note that I took the salt and the xanthan gum (the Bob's Red Mill brand) to the 2% maximum and the Leavening (the GdL and the Arm & Hammer baking soda combined) to 1.9%, or just shy of the 2% maximum. I used a ratio of about 2.2:1 for the GdL and the baking soda. The amount of sugar was established to be roughly equivalent from a sweetness standpoint to a combination of table sugar and dextrose. For the shortening, I used Crisco vegetable shortening as a proxy for the commercial/industrial shortening that Pillsbury uses, mainly because the Crisco product has the right Total Fat and Sat Fat profile.

In order to determine how much of the Hodgson Mill VWG to add to the Pillsbury bleached all-purpose flour to raise the protein content of the Pillsbury flour (assumed to be 11%) to 11.5%, I used the Mixed Mass Percentage Calculator at http://foodsim.toastguard.com/. The amount of VWG came to about 0.90%, so it is below the 2% threshhold.

You will also note that I used a bowl residue compensation of 1.5%. That was done to increase the total dough weight by 1.5% to compensate for minor dough losses during preparation of the dough. When the dough has been made, you should reduce its weight to 390 grams by trimming off (on the scale) anything in excess of 390 grams. In order to come up with the final formatting of the dough formulation, I modified the output of the expanded dough calculating tool to reflect what I did (including using one of the unused entry boxes as a proxy for the xanthan gum). This is what I ended up with:

Flour/VWG Blend* (100%):
Water (55%):
Salt (2%):
Sugar (8.8%):
Bob's Red Mill Xanthan Gum (2%):
Crisco Vegetable Shortening (5.4%):
Arm & Hammer Baking Soda (0.6%):
Glucono-delta Lactone (GdL) (1.3%):
Total (175.1%):
226.07 g  |  7.97 oz | 0.5 lbs
124.34 g  |  4.39 oz | 0.27 lbs
4.52 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.81 tsp | 0.27 tbsp
19.89 g | 0.7 oz | 0.04 lbs | 4.99 tsp | 1.66 tbsp
4.52 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.51 tsp
12.21 g | 0.43 oz | 0.03 lbs | 3.4 tsp | 1.2 tbsp
1.36 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.28 tsp
2.94 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.59 tsp
395.85 g | 13.96 oz | 0.87 lbs | TF = N/A
*The Flour/VWG Blend comprises 224.1 grams (7.90 ounces) of Pillsbury bleached all-purpose flour and 2 grams (0.68 teaspoon) of Hodgson Mill VWG
Note: The final dough weight (trimmed) should be 390 grams; bowl residue compensation = 1.5%

As an aside, if you are wondering whether the ingredients listed as being 2% or less have to be listed by order of predominance, the answer is no:

The US Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR 101.4) states that ingredients must be listed in descending order of predominance based on weight. The following exception is made in 21 CFR 101.4(2):

The descending order of predominance requirements of paragraph (a)(1) of this section do not apply to ingredients present in amounts of 2 percent or less by weight when a listing of these ingredients is placed at the end of the ingredient statement following an appropriate quantifying statement, e.g., "Contains __ percent or less of _" or "Less than _ percent of __." The blank percentage within the quantifying statement shall be filled in with a threshold level of 2 percent, or, if desired, 1.5 percent, 1.0 percent, or 0.5 percent, as appropriate. No ingredient to which the quantifying phrase applies may be present in an amount greater than the stated threshold.

Thus, each ingredient is 2% or less of the total weight. They are also exempt from the order by weight requirement. The manufacturer is free to order the subset of < 2% ingredients however they please.

Source: 21 CFR 101.4

Peter

Peter, have you tried to test this formulation yourself? killmeyer000 said maybe something wrong. can you fix? I would like to make a dough with Pillsbury's ingredients like xanthan gum and GdL..., too. Can you guys help me with the latest dough formulation please?
« Last Edit: March 18, 2016, 10:53:09 PM by lupin05 »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #28 on: March 19, 2016, 01:13:39 PM »
Peter, have you tried to test this formulation yourself? killmeyer000 said maybe something wrong. can you fix? I would like to make a dough with Pillsbury's ingredients like xanthan gum and GdL..., too. Can you guys help me with the latest dough formulation please?
Lupin,

No, I never tried the formulation myself, and normally I wouldn't go out to search for items like xanthan gum and GdL that would have only limited use to me. I came up with the formulation for two reasons. One was to try to help John, especially since he was willing to look for all of the ingredients that Pillsbury used. Secondarily, I wanted to see if I could learn something useful in the process. I don't know what John did that led to his poor results, or even if it was the formulation itself that was not right or at fault. John did not come back to this thread with any follow-up results, although he did return to the forum after his last post in this thread. So, maybe he gave up trying to make the formulation work.

It's been a while since I last looked at this thread but let me revisit it to see if anything that I might have since learned may be of any help to you.

Peter

Offline lupin05

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #29 on: March 19, 2016, 01:29:23 PM »
Lupin,

No, I never tried the formulation myself, and normally I wouldn't go out to search for items like xanthan gum and GdL that would have only limited use to me. I came up with the formulation for two reasons. One was to try to help John, especially since he was willing to look for all of the ingredients that Pillsbury used. Secondarily, I wanted to see if I could learn something useful in the process. I don't know what John did that led to his poor results, or even if it was the formulation itself that was not right or at fault. John did not come back to this thread with any follow-up results, although he did return to the forum after his last post in this thread. So, maybe he gave up trying to make the formulation work.

It's been a while since I last looked at this thread but let me revisit it to see if anything that I might have since learned may be of any help to you.

Peter

Thank you Peter. Guess I'll look for xathan gum and GdL and test your previous formulations first. The reason I asked you because I'm a newbie and all I can do is just following recipes, sadly I can't adjust it myself  :P I'm trying to clone a pillbury's pizza crust for small scale production, and then distribute to some baking shop in my local area, they don't have premade pizza dough in tubes that many customers are asking for.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2016, 01:33:14 PM by lupin05 »

Offline Killmeyer000

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #30 on: March 20, 2016, 08:03:10 PM »
Yeah...I pretty much gave up.  I got too busy at work, etc.  I do think this formulation below came out pretty well (including my notes below Pete-zza's recipe where I actually used KABF and olive oil).  But, I would like to try it with a little baking powder to give more puff (maybe 4 grams?)...and still keep the IDY.  To get the browning on the finished product, I painted the dough with a scrambled egg just before going into the oven.  These are baked at 425 degrees Fahrenheit for about 16 minutes...turning the pan halfway through the bake for evenness.  Remember to cut holes in the tops before baking to allow steam to escape.  Brush the pans with olive oil before placing the uncooked dough on them.

It would be nice to do all of this...and keep around 55% hydration. (use KABF instead of all purpose/VWG blend, olive oil instead of shortening and around 4 grams baking powder added to the below recipe without removing the IDY).  It's probably close as it is...but maybe needs the water amount changed...not sure how much?


John,

All-Purpose Flour/VWG Blend (100%):
Water (55%):
IDY (0.25%):
Salt (2%):
Sugar (8.7%):
Shortening (5.3%):
Total (171.25%):
227.74 g  |  8.03 oz | 0.5 lbs
125.26 g  |  4.42 oz | 0.28 lbs
0.57 g | 0.02 oz | 0 lbs | 0.19 tsp | 0.06 tbsp
4.55 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.82 tsp | 0.27 tbsp
19.81 g | 0.7 oz | 0.04 lbs | 4.97 tsp | 1.66 tbsp
12.07 g | 0.43 oz | 0.03 lbs | 3.02 tsp | 1.01 tbsp
390 g | 13.76 oz | 0.86 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: No bowl residue compensation.

You will want to note that the flour blend and water weights are closer to what you came up with. Since the shortening does not contain water, you can use the same percentage of olive oil should you decide to use same.


Quote
FYI...What I did was follow this recipe...but used 100% KABF.  I doubled the recipe...that's why my pics show two dough balls...one dough ball makes 4 pepperoni rolls.  I looked up how much protein was in the Pillsbury classic pizza dough...and then how much protein was in KABF...and it appeared that bread flour would be a good match...or at least it had a similar protein content in the finished dough ball as the Pillsbury.  I also used Olive Oil instead of shortening.

I would like to keep the yeast...but add in baking powder, but not remove any flour...which will end up at a slightly lower hydration.  I'm not sure how much baking powder to add though.  Based on the previous posts from peter, 4 grams looks like a good starting point for baking powder.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2016, 09:06:46 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #31 on: March 20, 2016, 09:43:33 PM »
John,

I spent a lot of time today rereading this thread and also the articles on chemical leavening systems cited in the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=41632.0. I was looking mostly for references to the GdL.

I am not surprised by the fact that the dough you made using the formulation in Reply 22 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=29506.msg299055#msg299055 did not rise. That is not uncommon for a dough leavened with chemicals rather than yeast. However, the dough should have risen during baking, which is when the leavening system is activated.

As for the hydration issue, today I conducted a simple experiment in which I made a dough following the formulation set forth in Reply 22 referenced above but using Gold Medal bread flour (the only flour I had on hand) but omitting the ingredients I did not have, namely, the xanthan gum and the GdL. I also did not use any Mono and Diglycerides (emulsifiers for binding the fats with water) as cited in the Pillsbury ingredient list at http://www.pillsbury.com/products/pizza-crust/classic-pizza-crust. To make the test dough, I combined all of the dry ingredients (flour, salt, sugar, and baking soda) in the mixer bowl of my food processor, and then pulsed in the Crisco. I used the food processor since you had indicated that the dough you made was dry and I wanted to avoid that outcome if I used my stand mixer. I then gradually added the water to the mixer bowl and pulsed it into the dough until I saw that the dough was starting to come together in the form of a ball. I then ran the food processor until the ball was completely formed, which took about 10 seconds at full speed. That dough ball was fairly soft and cohesive and, as best I could tell, was quite normal in feel and appearance. I should add that I used water at room temperature, to simulate what I would have done had I used the xanthan gum and GdL--to keep from activating those ingredients from the frictional heat of mixing. In fact, using cool or cold water might be even better.

The above test was for the benefit of member Lupin and I had planned to suggest that he try the formulation as I posted it in Reply 22 referenced above, including the way that I made the dough. I'm quite certain that the addition of the baking soda and GdL (and the emulsifiers, if desired) would not change the hydration of the dough in any material respect.

In case Lupin would also like to use the diglyceride emulsifiers, one retail source for those emulsifiers is http://www.modernistpantry.com/glycerin-flakes.html. I am not sure it they are really needed but I mention them because Pillsbury uses them.

When I have a chance, I will look into your request to use a modified version using KABF, yeast, olive oil and baking powder.

BTW, welcome back.

Peter

Offline lupin05

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #32 on: March 21, 2016, 12:36:23 AM »
The above test was for the benefit of member Lupin and I had planned to suggest that he try the formulation as I posted it in Reply 22 referenced above, including the way that I made the dough. I'm quite certain that the addition of the baking soda and GdL (and the emulsifiers, if desired) would not change the hydration of the dough in any material respect.

In case Lupin would also like to use the diglyceride emulsifiers, one retail source for those emulsifiers is http://www.modernistpantry.com/glycerin-flakes.html. I am not sure it they are really needed but I mention them because Pillsbury uses them.

When I have a chance, I will look into your request to use a modified version using KABF, yeast, olive oil and baking powder.

BTW, welcome back.

Peter

Peter,

Sorry for my bad English, as I may not understand what you said perfectly. You mean that your formulation in reply 22 is okay and I can followed it, right? even when I add xanthan gum and GdL.. which you omitted so I will get the same result as yours test? I placed order for xanthan gum and GdL online and they'll be shipped to me in 1 week, can't wait  :'(. Do you know what's the use of diglyceride emulsifiers for dough? I can't find this ingredient in my local area so I guess I'll have to do without it.

Thank you,

Offline lupin05

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #33 on: March 21, 2016, 09:42:00 AM »
Sorry my mistake. As you said, Mono and Diglycerides (emulsifiers for binding the fats with water). I found a supplier which I can buy it from, so can you help me to calculate the % and how many grams of  Mono and Diglycerides to use in the formulation?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #34 on: March 21, 2016, 10:06:52 AM »
Peter,

Sorry for my bad English, as I may not understand what you said perfectly. You mean that your formulation in reply 22 is okay and I can followed it, right? even when I add xanthan gum and GdL.. which you omitted so I will get the same result as yours test? I placed order for xanthan gum and GdL online and they'll be shipped to me in 1 week, can't wait  :'(. Do you know what's the use of diglyceride emulsifiers for dough? I can't find this ingredient in my local area so I guess I'll have to do without it.

Thank you,
Lupin,

Your English is fine. And you understood correctly what I was trying to say about Reply 22. My advice at this point after having reread and studied everything in this thread and a few other places, and also after having run the simple test dough that I discussed to establish or confirm what appears to me to be a workable hydration without having a real Pillsbury dough for comparison purposes, is to start with the formulation as set forth in Reply 22.

Sorry my mistake. As you said, Mono and Diglycerides (emulsifiers for binding the fats with water). I found a supplier which I can buy it from, so can you help me to calculate the % and how many grams of  Mono and Diglycerides to use in the formulation?

All we know is that the mono and diglycerides are used at less than 2%. Unfortunately, there is no way that I am aware of to be able to be more precise although I will try to get at least a general feel as to how much might be reasonable for our purposes. What you are trying to do is to replicate a commercial dough made using commercial equipment about which we have no knowledge. We know the ingredients and we know some of the nutritional information, because Pillsbury told us, but the best we can do is to make educated guesses, both as to the way the science works and the amounts of the individual ingredients. And if we guess wrong, you may not get the desired results or it may take several other tries to get things right or at least acceptable to you. It would be rare to get everything right the first time out of the gate. But one of the things that offers hope to me is the use of the particular leavening system that Pillsbury uses, that is, the combination of the baking soda and the GdL, and especially the GdL because it is crucial in my opinion to a dough that is to be refrigerated for a fairly long time, as is the case with refrigerated doughs sold in supermarkets.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #35 on: March 21, 2016, 01:58:01 PM »
Lupin,

After my last post, I looked into the matter of the mono and diglycerides. As it turns out, the Crisco shortenings, whether of the older or newer variety (I have the older variety), already include mono and diglycerides (see http://www.shopwell.com/crisco-shortening-all-vegetable/shortening/p/5150024171). So, there should be no need to purchase separate mono and diglycerides. It appears that Pillsbury constructs its dough using separate ingredients rather than products like the Crisco shortening that contain two or more of the needed ingredients.

Peter

Offline vtsteve

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #36 on: March 21, 2016, 02:28:40 PM »
If you can find a commercial 'high ratio cake shortening', it probably has a higher percentage of emulsifiers than Crisco or other consumer shortenings.
In grams we trust.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #37 on: March 22, 2016, 10:04:24 AM »
If you can find a commercial 'high ratio cake shortening', it probably has a higher percentage of emulsifiers than Crisco or other consumer shortenings.
Steve,

Thank you for the suggestion. I learn something new every day.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #38 on: March 22, 2016, 02:00:14 PM »
This morning, while at a local supermarket, I decided to check to see if it carried the Pillsbury Classic pizza dough. It did. I was especially curious to see if the formulation and Nutritional Facts were the same as reported in this thread. The answer is that the ingredients have changed somewhat but the nutrient values are the same. This is the list of ingredients that I sat today:

Enriched Flour Bleached (wheat flour, niacin, ferrous sulfate, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), Water, Sugar, Dextrose. Contains 2% or less of: Vital Wheat Gluten, Leavening (glucono delta-lactone, baking soda), Soybean Oil, Salt, Potassium Chloride, Mono and Diglycerides, Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil (soybean, palm, and/or cottonseed), Natural Flavor, Xanthan Gum.

For comparison purposes, this is the earlier ingredients list:

Enriched Flour Bleached (wheat flour, niacin, ferrous sulfate, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), Water, Dextrose, Sugar, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean And/or Cottonseed Oil. Contains 2% or less of: Vital Wheat Gluten, Leavening (glucono delta-lactone, baking soda), Salt, Mono and Diglycerides, Xanthan Gum.

When I returned home, I went online to see if I could find the most recent Pillsbury ingredients list. I could not, even at the Pillsbury website, where the original list still appears, or at several online retail websites.

The changes in the two ingredients lists include: 1) using more sugar than dextrose (the positions of the two sugars were swapped), 2) adding Soybean Oil, 3) adding Potassium Chloride, 4) using palm oil as part of its hydrogenated fat, 5) adding a Natural Flavor (whatever that is), and 6) adjusting the amounts of ingredients such that the Nutrition Facts remain the same. Potassium chloride is a well known substitute for sodium (salt) but by itself it is a fairly bitter ingredient, so it is often combined with salt. The use of palm oil is a move that just about everyone who has made margarine or shortening in the past is making to get the Trans Fats out of their products as much as possible. As I see it, there are ingredients in both products that are present in shortening, but the more recent Pillsbury product uses fats that are more like the most recent shortening products with the palm oil, palm kernal or similar ingredients.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #39 on: March 22, 2016, 02:13:24 PM »
After my last post, I found another version of the ingredients list for the Pillsbury Classic pizza dough, at http://www.shoprite.com/pd/Pillsbury/Pizza-Crust-Classic/13-80-oz/018000003389/, as follows:

Enriched Flour Bleached (Wheat Flour, Niacin, Ferrous Sulfate, Thiamin Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Water, Sugar, Dextrose. Contains 2% or Less of Vital Wheat Gluten, Leavening (Glucono Delta-Lactone, Baking Soda), Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil and/or Cottonseed Oil, Salt, Potassium Chloride, Mono- and Diglycerides, Natural Flavor, Xanthan Gum.

I would guess that the above ingredients list was created between the last two lists discussed. Or else the above list was not accurately reproduced.

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Can U Help Me Copy Pillsbury Pizza Dough For Pepperoni Rolls
« Reply #40 on: March 22, 2016, 02:53:46 PM »
John,

I have been kicking around your request in my head. Can you tell me what brand of baking powder you plan to use and its specific constituent ingredients? Also, if the container recommends a specific usage, can you tell me what it is? That amount can vary from brand to brand. I'd also like to revisit the articles referenced in the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=41632.msg415897#msg415897 for possible guidance once I know what is in the baking powder you plan to use.

In general, I think you can safely use the KABF and, with the proper amount of sugar, come close to meeting the carbohydrate and dietary fiber nutrient values of the Pillsbury Classic pizza dough. More specifically as to the sugar, there are two sugars in the Pillsbury dough, dextrose and regular sugar, and if you will be using only regular sugar, we will want to select an amount that will not yield an overly sweet crust, which is a complaint I read from some reviews of the Pillsbury Classic crust. The KABF should be also impart a nice wheaty flavor to the finished crust, and that should be an improvement over the bleached, unmalted flour used by Pillsbury.

The salt amount may have to be reduced to compensate for the fair amount of sodium in the baking powder (specifically, the baking soda part).

The Pillsbury Classic pizza dough calls for a fair amount of total fat but the good news is that you can substitute olive oil on a one-for-one basis weight-wise for the shortening since shortening does not include water that would otherwise have to be accounted for in the final hydration. But if you plan to use olive oil, and because of the amount of olive oil that you would use as a substitute for shortening, you may want to use a light olive oil to subdue the fairly strong flavor that extra virgin olive oil would impart to the finished crust. That is perhaps why Pillsbury does not use olive oil, but the more likely reason is that soybean oil is much cheaper than olive oil, even the pomace olive oil. The soybean oil also has a neutral flavor. But, together with the other fats, and the large amount of sugar, it will impart a high degree of tenderness to the crumb of the finished crust.

As for the hydration value to use, my practice is to use a combination of water and oil that, together, is about equivalent to the rated absorption for the flour. For the KABF, that rated absorption value is 62%.

For my purposes, I am using the specifications for the KABF at http://web.archive.org/web/20060311133549/http://www.kingarthurflour.com/stuff/contentmgr/files/528fa553a218e1e5566108ef6e4c55d9/miscdocs/Nutritional%20Analysis.pdf. In that document, the KABF is called Special, which is the name used for the KABF as sold in big bags to professionals.

If there are any other factors that you would like me to consider, please let me know.

Peter


 

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