Author Topic: Greek pizza  (Read 91735 times)

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Offline wrm2012

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #520 on: May 01, 2013, 06:58:39 AM »
I’m not sure how I could lift the edge as the cheese and sauce are put on right up to the edge of the pan.  Could be kind of a mess and I really don’t want to mess with the crispy cheese at the edge as I really like it.  So I made a BBQ chicken last night and cooked it at 500 degrees with out a stone for 10 min.  It turned out just about perfect.  You know I’m going to have to try a preheated stone now right? :)   Still useing the recipe in reply #20 and a 16 inch pan.  I used half mozzarella and half cheddar, sweet Baby Rays, left over grilled chicken from the night before, and red onions.  It was one of my best.  Anyone else notice after the dough has been left in the pan to raise that there is air trapped under the dough?  When I sauce it I can tell there is a bubble under there I lift up the edge and let it out.  I know that it isn’t there when I put the dough into the pan as this time I made sure the dough was pressed down into the pan and no air pockets were there.  Gasses from the yeast maybe?


Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #521 on: May 01, 2013, 09:28:25 AM »
Yeah, i know what you mean about lifting the edge, but it can be done with a little practice and if you're careful.
Your BBQ chicken pie sounds good. Maybe some pics next time, huh? ;) :angel:
You're probably right about the bubbles under the dough being from the yeast activity, and that's something else that needs to be watched while the pie is baking. I once left a pie alone in the oven for 10 minutes only to find that the cheese and oil around the edge had formed a perfect seal and the entire pie was one big bubble. The top was burned while the whole bottom was completely uncooked. :( >:( :'( :-D

Offline wrm2012

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #522 on: May 01, 2013, 09:49:27 AM »
Thanks Ev. Well my son did take a pic of it and it is on his Ipod.  I'll try and post it after he gets back from school.   
« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 09:53:04 AM by wrm2012 »

Offline wrm2012

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #523 on: May 06, 2013, 08:06:14 AM »
Ok here is the pic of the BBQ chicken and onion.  Pic thanks to my 10 year old and his Ipod.

Offline ealmon

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #524 on: May 24, 2013, 01:58:20 PM »
Made my first couple pizza's.  Trying to replicate Lynwood Cafe.  The pizzas were tasty but not Lynwood yet...probably never, but I'll keep trying.  Thanks for all the info from this board getting me off to a good start!

The dough was cold fermented 3 days, and then allowed to rise for 1 hr. at room temp before shaping, then allowed to rise another 2 hrs. in the pan before dressing.  Pretty happy with the dough, although it seemed a bit more airy than than the style I'm going for.  Sauce was good, but next time I'll try without the Thyme which my wife found to be too much.  I thought the sauce and cheese were a bit too thin, so next time I'll try 1/2 cup sauce and 1 cup cheese per pizza.

Dough: (8oz. dough ball per 10” pizza)
Flour (100%):    523.94 g  |  18.48 oz | 1.16 lbs
Water (40%):    209.58 g  |  7.39 oz | 0.46 lbs
IDY (.4%):    2.1 g | 0.07 oz | 0 lbs | 0.7 tsp | 0.23 tbsp
Salt (1.75%):    9.17 g | 0.32 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.64 tsp | 0.55 tbsp
Olive Oil (1%):    5.24 g | 0.18 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.16 tsp | 0.39 tbsp
Sugar (2%):    10.48 g | 0.37 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.63 tsp | 0.88 tbsp
Milk (fresh) (20%):    104.79 g | 3.7 oz | 0.23 lbs | 6.99 tbsp | 0.44 cups
Eggs, large (8%):    41.92 g | 1.48 oz | 0.09 lbs | 8.28 tsp | 2.76 tbsp
Total (173.15%):   907.2 g | 32 oz | 2 lbs | TF = N/A
Single Ball:   226.8 g | 8 oz | 0.5 lbs

Sauce:
•   recipe:
o   28 oz. can 6 in 1 tomatoes
o   ½ teaspoon garlic salt
o   1 teaspoon thyme
o   ½ teaspoon oregano
o   Ό teaspoon rosemary
o   1 ½ tablespoons olive oil
o   ½ teaspoon sugar
o   ½ teaspoon black pepper
•   dampen all spices and microwave for 2 minutes on low
•   add to tomatoes and blend until smooth
•   refrigerate overnight
•   1/3 cup ladled onto dough

Cheese:
•   Pizza 1: 50% sargento 4 state cheddar (1/3 cup), 50% sargento mozzarella (1/3 cup)
•   Pizza 2: 100% sargento mozzarella (2/3 cup)

Topping:
•   Pepperoni (Carando thick slice) – both pizzas

Cook time/temp:
•   Preheat oven and stone for 1hr @ 500
•   Cook 10 minutes or until cheese starts to brown


Offline Marvin

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #525 on: May 24, 2013, 03:52:10 PM »
the pies look  great
so there is enough dough for 4- 10"  pizza's ?
and would you say maybe half tsp thyme ?
my wife likes the greek will have to try this.
thanks Marvin
« Last Edit: May 24, 2013, 03:56:51 PM by Marvin »

Offline ealmon

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #526 on: May 24, 2013, 05:39:27 PM »
Thanks Marvin.  Yes, that recipe yields four 10" pies.  I think I'll actually drop the thyme altogether and just increase the rosemary (maybe 1/2 tsp) which people seem to think is the signature spice of Lynwood.  I don't have the most refined palate, but rosemary and thyme seem pretty similar to me, so working with just one of those spices will at least make it easier for me know what I have to tweak to get the taste right as I continue working on the recipe.

Offline ealmon

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #527 on: May 24, 2013, 05:43:07 PM »
I should add that nick378311 posted that sauce recipe, as a close match to Cape Cod Cafe I believe.  I'm going for a Lynwood taste which is a little different.

Offline Marvin

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #528 on: May 24, 2013, 06:13:25 PM »
I tried some time back to make her favored
And ended up with a two inch thick crust(should of took a picture)
It was combo of things went wrong
But the sauce had called for cinnamon
Didn't care for that
Will try this week
Thanks again Marvin


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #529 on: May 26, 2013, 02:09:19 PM »
A couple of years ago, I developed a dough formulation for a Greek style pizza that called for using milk and eggs. The formulation was based on a Greek style pizza that I had in a pizzeria in Marblehead, Massachusetts. I dubbed the dough formulation MA#1 and disclosed it at Reply 242 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,691.msg144176.html#msg144176.

Recently, while on vacation in MA, I decided to make a return visit to the abovementioned pizzeria. As it so happened, the same pizza maker was there. After ordering a pizza, I asked him if he was still using the Pillsbury 4X flour, and eggs and milk in his pizzas. He replied that he was. I then asked him if he was still using cake yeast and he again replied yes. He volunteered that it came from Anheuser Busch, and was available only from a foodservice company. When I asked him if he made a same day dough or a cold fermented dough, he hesitated for a moment and then asked me: "What are you trying to do, open a pizzeria?" I laughed and said that pizza was just a hobby for me but he then proceeded to say that the dough was fermented in his coolers for about a day. On that basis, the amount of cake yeast recited in Reply 242 referenced above might be increase to about 1-1.25%. I found it quite amusing that he would look at me quizzically when I asked him about the dough but he would eventually answer my questions.

After eating the pizza, I thanked the pizza maker and jokingly told him that I would be returning again and expected to learn the rest of his secrets so that I could make a clone of his dough. That drew a big smile.

Peter


Offline norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #530 on: May 26, 2013, 04:02:01 PM »
A couple of years ago, I developed a dough formulation for a Greek style pizza that called for using milk and eggs. The formulation was based on a Greek style pizza that I had in a pizzeria in Marblehead, Massachusetts. I dubbed the dough formulation MA#1 and disclosed it at Reply 242 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,691.msg144176.html#msg144176.

Recently, while on vacation in MA, I decided to make a return visit to the abovementioned pizzeria. As it so happened, the same pizza maker was there. After ordering a pizza, I asked him if he was still using the Pillsbury 4X flour, and eggs and milk in his pizzas. He replied that he was. I then asked him if he was still using cake yeast and he again replied yes. He volunteered that it came from Anheuser Busch, and was available only from a foodservice company. When I asked him if he made a same day dough or a cold fermented dough, he hesitated for a moment and then asked me: "What are you trying to do, open a pizzeria?" I laughed and said that pizza was just a hobby for me but he then proceeded to say that the dough was fermented in his coolers for about a day. On that basis, the amount of cake yeast recited in Reply 242 referenced above might be increase to about 1-1.25%. I found it quite amusing that he would look at me quizzically when I asked him about the dough but he would eventually answer my questions.

After eating the pizza, I thanked the pizza maker and jokingly told him that I would be returning again and expected to learn the rest of his secrets so that I could make a clone of his dough. That drew a big smile.

Peter


Peter,

That was good detective work.  8)  I wonder what that pizza maker would think if he knew you can clone pizzas.  I wonder if I can obtain any of the cake yeast from Anheuser Busch.  How did you like that pizza and did you think it had any different taste in the crust from using the cake yeast from Anheuser Busch?  Also what topping did you have on that pizza.

Norma
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #531 on: May 26, 2013, 05:07:11 PM »
I wonder what that pizza maker would think if he knew you can clone pizzas.  I wonder if I can obtain any of the cake yeast from Anheuser Busch.  How did you like that pizza and did you think it had any different taste in the crust from using the cake yeast from Anheuser Busch?  Also what topping did you have on that pizza.

Norma,

I do not think that the pizza maker was worried about what I would do with the information. Also, I told him that I was from Texas (he said that he remembered me from my last visit). So, I would not be a threat to his business if I had a pizzeria in Texas using a dough like his. As for the Anheuser Busch cake yeast, you would have to search out a source. I remember some time ago that Pizzeria Regina in the Boston area allegedly used a yeast product from Anheuser Busch, so it looks like there may be a foodservice company in the region that can supply the Anheuser Busch yeast. If I had to guess, based on research that I conducted and discussed at the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10382.msg91533.html#msg91533, whoever is selling the Anheuser Busch fresh yeast may be authorized to use the Anheuser Busch name. AB allegedly sold its yeast business in 1988 so it may be a successor in interest who may now be selling the AB yeast products for baking applications.

I can't say that I detected the fresh yeast in the pizza I had. Part of the problem is that the pizza had a lot of toppings on it. I was with a friend and I told him to order whatever he wanted. So, he selected the Special. That pizza had something of everything on it. But the crust did taste good. It also had a nice yellowish coloration and the bottom had the desired fried effect.

I also learned indirectly that the pizzeria did not use Stanislaus tomato products. When I asked the pizza maker if they used Stanislaus products, he said that he had not heard of the company. I told him that Stanislaus makes good products and that he should try them. He said that they have been making the pizzas the same way for over forty years and weren't about to change anything. You can see a photo of the pizzeria at http://www.yelp.com/biz_photos/marblehead-house-of-pizza-marblehead?select=1Z3NoNTpeNVpJZIhbuo1aA#1Z3NoNTpeNVpJZIhbuo1aA.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #532 on: May 26, 2013, 07:43:31 PM »
Norma,

I do not think that the pizza maker was worried about what I would do with the information. Also, I told him that I was from Texas (he said that he remembered me from my last visit). So, I would not be a threat to his business if I had a pizzeria in Texas using a dough like his. As for the Anheuser Busch cake yeast, you would have to search out a source. I remember some time ago that Pizzeria Regina in the Boston area allegedly used a yeast product from Anheuser Busch, so it looks like there may be a foodservice company in the region that can supply the Anheuser Busch yeast. If I had to guess, based on research that I conducted and discussed at the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10382.msg91533.html#msg91533, whoever is selling the Anheuser Busch fresh yeast may be authorized to use the Anheuser Busch name. AB allegedly sold its yeast business in 1988 so it may be a successor in interest who may now be selling the AB yeast products for baking applications.

I can't say that I detected the fresh yeast in the pizza I had. Part of the problem is that the pizza had a lot of toppings on it. I was with a friend and I told him to order whatever he wanted. So, he selected the Special. That pizza had something of everything on it. But the crust did taste good. It also had a nice yellowish coloration and the bottom had the desired fried effect.

I also learned indirectly that the pizzeria did not use Stanislaus tomato products. When I asked the pizza maker if they used Stanislaus products, he said that he had not heard of the company. I told him that Stanislaus makes good products and that he should try them. He said that they have been making the pizzas the same way for over forty years and weren't about to change anything. You can see a photo of the pizzeria at http://www.yelp.com/biz_photos/marblehead-house-of-pizza-marblehead?select=1Z3NoNTpeNVpJZIhbuo1aA#1Z3NoNTpeNVpJZIhbuo1aA.

Peter


Peter,

I can understand that you wouldn't be a threat to pizzeria in Marblehead, Massachusetts since you live in Texas.  I will tell Steve to check out your post at Reply 13 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10382.msg91812.html#msg91812 and see if he can locate any of that yeast.

Thanks for explaining how the crust tasted and how it had a nice yellowish coloration.  I would guess the yellow coloration would come from the eggs in the dough, but don't really know. 

I guess some old-time pizza makers don't get out very much if they never heard of Stanislaus products.  I can understand though why they didn't want to change anything after 40 years. 

Thanks for the link to the pizzeria to see the photos.  The photo of the Greek pizza doesn't look like it has those caramelized edges at all.

Norma
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #533 on: May 27, 2013, 03:03:49 PM »
Norma,

The pizza maker I spoke with at the Marblehead House of Pizza is shown at the right in the photo at http://marblehead.patch.com/articles/this-week-s-grown-ups-2-fan-photos-0e909bc6#photo-10472614. I'm glad I found the photo since it gives the name of the pizza maker (Bill Reisopoulos). That way, I can address him by name the next time I visit his pizzeria. The two other men in the photo are Shaquille O'Neal and Peter Dante, both of whom were in uniform for a movie in which they appeared as actors (http://www.imdb.com/media/rm2652086528/nm0200601).

You are correct that the Marblehead House of Pizza pizzas do not exhibit the crusting of the cheese at the edges. I discovered the same lack of crusting of the cheese in other Greek style pizzerias I visited. So, it is not unusual.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #534 on: May 27, 2013, 06:31:24 PM »
Norma,

The pizza maker I spoke with at the Marblehead House of Pizza is shown at the right in the photo at http://marblehead.patch.com/articles/this-week-s-grown-ups-2-fan-photos-0e909bc6#photo-10472614. I'm glad I found the photo since it gives the name of the pizza maker (Bill Reisopoulos). That way, I can address him by name the next time I visit his pizzeria. The two other men in the photo are Shaquille O'Neal and Peter Dante, both of whom were in uniform for a movie in which they appeared as actors (http://www.imdb.com/media/rm2652086528/nm0200601).

You are correct that the Marblehead House of Pizza pizzas do not exhibit the crusting of the cheese at the edges. I discovered the same lack of crusting of the cheese in other Greek style pizzerias I visited. So, it is not unusual.

Peter


Peter,

Thanks for the link to the photo to show who the pizza maker at Marblehead House of Pizza was.   Being opened for 44 years is quite an accomplishment. 

I only discovered Greek style pizzas from Steve, but I thought most of them had had that crusting of cheese at the edges.  Interesting to know that some other pizzerias you visited also had that lack of crusting of cheese.

Norma
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Offline cmyden

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #535 on: June 14, 2013, 04:59:46 PM »
As an update on my quest to replicate the Greek Style pizza found here in Western Alberta, I ran across another pizza joint named Niko's that makes pizza that is nearly identical to my beloved Atlas.

(pics below)

After many attempts, I've been unable to replicate the coloring and texture of the cheese at home.  It might just be impossible with a standard oven!


Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #536 on: June 20, 2013, 04:55:08 PM »
cmyden, you should make a visit to Niko's and see if you can find out if they are using the same convection-type pizza oven as is used at Atlas.  That will give evidence for or against the convection oven theory.

Offline nicu2001

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #537 on: September 24, 2013, 09:31:05 AM »
Hi guys,

I have not made a greek pizza in about a year and want to make one this Friday.  I am planning to mix the dough tonight and cold ferment for three days.  I have only made this style based on reply 20 from Pete-zza:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,691.msg27482.html#msg27482

Given that it is 7 years later, I was wondering if anyone who has experimented with different Greek formulations could offer what they think is the best dough for this style?  Stick with reply 20?

If it helps in your recommendation, I will be cooking these in a gas oven that gets to about 550-575 and have both a baking steel and a pizza stone that I can use.  I have 1" steel pans.  Flour is All Trumps.

Thanks in advance!

Offline nicu2001

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #538 on: September 30, 2013, 08:10:23 AM »
My Greek pizza revisit was a success.  I used the original from reply 20 with great results after a 3 day cold ferment.  Differences this time are that I now have two 3/8" steel plates to work with.  1 hour preheat with the oven on max at 500 and the bottom steel plate was 585 and the top was 535.  I am looking forward to trying NY style this week on the plates.  My only complaints would be that I could have used a little more cheese and maybe somehow gotten the crust a little less soft.  The bottom was perfect though.

Offline norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #539 on: December 21, 2013, 03:26:32 PM »
If anyone is interested in the other photos of Greek style pizza that was made in the Blackstone unit the photos and the formulation I used starts at Reply 346 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,26483.msg293479.html#msg293479 

Norma
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