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Offline Marvin

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #525 on: May 24, 2013, 03:52:10 PM »
the pies look  great
so there is enough dough for 4- 10"  pizza's ?
and would you say maybe half tsp thyme ?
my wife likes the greek will have to try this.
thanks Marvin
« Last Edit: May 24, 2013, 03:56:51 PM by Marvin »


Offline ealmon

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #526 on: May 24, 2013, 05:39:27 PM »
Thanks Marvin.  Yes, that recipe yields four 10" pies.  I think I'll actually drop the thyme altogether and just increase the rosemary (maybe 1/2 tsp) which people seem to think is the signature spice of Lynwood.  I don't have the most refined palate, but rosemary and thyme seem pretty similar to me, so working with just one of those spices will at least make it easier for me know what I have to tweak to get the taste right as I continue working on the recipe.

Offline ealmon

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #527 on: May 24, 2013, 05:43:07 PM »
I should add that nick378311 posted that sauce recipe, as a close match to Cape Cod Cafe I believe.  I'm going for a Lynwood taste which is a little different.

Offline Marvin

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #528 on: May 24, 2013, 06:13:25 PM »
I tried some time back to make her favored
And ended up with a two inch thick crust(should of took a picture)
It was combo of things went wrong
But the sauce had called for cinnamon
Didn't care for that
Will try this week
Thanks again Marvin


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #529 on: May 26, 2013, 02:09:19 PM »
A couple of years ago, I developed a dough formulation for a Greek style pizza that called for using milk and eggs. The formulation was based on a Greek style pizza that I had in a pizzeria in Marblehead, Massachusetts. I dubbed the dough formulation MA#1 and disclosed it at Reply 242 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,691.msg144176.html#msg144176.

Recently, while on vacation in MA, I decided to make a return visit to the abovementioned pizzeria. As it so happened, the same pizza maker was there. After ordering a pizza, I asked him if he was still using the Pillsbury 4X flour, and eggs and milk in his pizzas. He replied that he was. I then asked him if he was still using cake yeast and he again replied yes. He volunteered that it came from Anheuser Busch, and was available only from a foodservice company. When I asked him if he made a same day dough or a cold fermented dough, he hesitated for a moment and then asked me: "What are you trying to do, open a pizzeria?" I laughed and said that pizza was just a hobby for me but he then proceeded to say that the dough was fermented in his coolers for about a day. On that basis, the amount of cake yeast recited in Reply 242 referenced above might be increase to about 1-1.25%. I found it quite amusing that he would look at me quizzically when I asked him about the dough but he would eventually answer my questions.

After eating the pizza, I thanked the pizza maker and jokingly told him that I would be returning again and expected to learn the rest of his secrets so that I could make a clone of his dough. That drew a big smile.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #530 on: May 26, 2013, 04:02:01 PM »
A couple of years ago, I developed a dough formulation for a Greek style pizza that called for using milk and eggs. The formulation was based on a Greek style pizza that I had in a pizzeria in Marblehead, Massachusetts. I dubbed the dough formulation MA#1 and disclosed it at Reply 242 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,691.msg144176.html#msg144176.

Recently, while on vacation in MA, I decided to make a return visit to the abovementioned pizzeria. As it so happened, the same pizza maker was there. After ordering a pizza, I asked him if he was still using the Pillsbury 4X flour, and eggs and milk in his pizzas. He replied that he was. I then asked him if he was still using cake yeast and he again replied yes. He volunteered that it came from Anheuser Busch, and was available only from a foodservice company. When I asked him if he made a same day dough or a cold fermented dough, he hesitated for a moment and then asked me: "What are you trying to do, open a pizzeria?" I laughed and said that pizza was just a hobby for me but he then proceeded to say that the dough was fermented in his coolers for about a day. On that basis, the amount of cake yeast recited in Reply 242 referenced above might be increase to about 1-1.25%. I found it quite amusing that he would look at me quizzically when I asked him about the dough but he would eventually answer my questions.

After eating the pizza, I thanked the pizza maker and jokingly told him that I would be returning again and expected to learn the rest of his secrets so that I could make a clone of his dough. That drew a big smile.

Peter

Peter,

That was good detective work.  8)  I wonder what that pizza maker would think if he knew you can clone pizzas.  I wonder if I can obtain any of the cake yeast from Anheuser Busch.  How did you like that pizza and did you think it had any different taste in the crust from using the cake yeast from Anheuser Busch?  Also what topping did you have on that pizza.

Norma
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #531 on: May 26, 2013, 05:07:11 PM »
I wonder what that pizza maker would think if he knew you can clone pizzas.  I wonder if I can obtain any of the cake yeast from Anheuser Busch.  How did you like that pizza and did you think it had any different taste in the crust from using the cake yeast from Anheuser Busch?  Also what topping did you have on that pizza.
Norma,

I do not think that the pizza maker was worried about what I would do with the information. Also, I told him that I was from Texas (he said that he remembered me from my last visit). So, I would not be a threat to his business if I had a pizzeria in Texas using a dough like his. As for the Anheuser Busch cake yeast, you would have to search out a source. I remember some time ago that Pizzeria Regina in the Boston area allegedly used a yeast product from Anheuser Busch, so it looks like there may be a foodservice company in the region that can supply the Anheuser Busch yeast. If I had to guess, based on research that I conducted and discussed at the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10382.msg91533.html#msg91533, whoever is selling the Anheuser Busch fresh yeast may be authorized to use the Anheuser Busch name. AB allegedly sold its yeast business in 1988 so it may be a successor in interest who may now be selling the AB yeast products for baking applications.

I can't say that I detected the fresh yeast in the pizza I had. Part of the problem is that the pizza had a lot of toppings on it. I was with a friend and I told him to order whatever he wanted. So, he selected the Special. That pizza had something of everything on it. But the crust did taste good. It also had a nice yellowish coloration and the bottom had the desired fried effect.

I also learned indirectly that the pizzeria did not use Stanislaus tomato products. When I asked the pizza maker if they used Stanislaus products, he said that he had not heard of the company. I told him that Stanislaus makes good products and that he should try them. He said that they have been making the pizzas the same way for over forty years and weren't about to change anything. You can see a photo of the pizzeria at http://www.yelp.com/biz_photos/marblehead-house-of-pizza-marblehead?select=1Z3NoNTpeNVpJZIhbuo1aA#1Z3NoNTpeNVpJZIhbuo1aA.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #532 on: May 26, 2013, 07:43:31 PM »
Norma,

I do not think that the pizza maker was worried about what I would do with the information. Also, I told him that I was from Texas (he said that he remembered me from my last visit). So, I would not be a threat to his business if I had a pizzeria in Texas using a dough like his. As for the Anheuser Busch cake yeast, you would have to search out a source. I remember some time ago that Pizzeria Regina in the Boston area allegedly used a yeast product from Anheuser Busch, so it looks like there may be a foodservice company in the region that can supply the Anheuser Busch yeast. If I had to guess, based on research that I conducted and discussed at the thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10382.msg91533.html#msg91533, whoever is selling the Anheuser Busch fresh yeast may be authorized to use the Anheuser Busch name. AB allegedly sold its yeast business in 1988 so it may be a successor in interest who may now be selling the AB yeast products for baking applications.

I can't say that I detected the fresh yeast in the pizza I had. Part of the problem is that the pizza had a lot of toppings on it. I was with a friend and I told him to order whatever he wanted. So, he selected the Special. That pizza had something of everything on it. But the crust did taste good. It also had a nice yellowish coloration and the bottom had the desired fried effect.

I also learned indirectly that the pizzeria did not use Stanislaus tomato products. When I asked the pizza maker if they used Stanislaus products, he said that he had not heard of the company. I told him that Stanislaus makes good products and that he should try them. He said that they have been making the pizzas the same way for over forty years and weren't about to change anything. You can see a photo of the pizzeria at http://www.yelp.com/biz_photos/marblehead-house-of-pizza-marblehead?select=1Z3NoNTpeNVpJZIhbuo1aA#1Z3NoNTpeNVpJZIhbuo1aA.

Peter

Peter,

I can understand that you wouldn't be a threat to pizzeria in Marblehead, Massachusetts since you live in Texas.  I will tell Steve to check out your post at Reply 13 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10382.msg91812.html#msg91812 and see if he can locate any of that yeast.

Thanks for explaining how the crust tasted and how it had a nice yellowish coloration.  I would guess the yellow coloration would come from the eggs in the dough, but don't really know. 

I guess some old-time pizza makers don't get out very much if they never heard of Stanislaus products.  I can understand though why they didn't want to change anything after 40 years. 

Thanks for the link to the pizzeria to see the photos.  The photo of the Greek pizza doesn't look like it has those caramelized edges at all.

Norma
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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #533 on: May 27, 2013, 03:03:49 PM »
Norma,

The pizza maker I spoke with at the Marblehead House of Pizza is shown at the right in the photo at http://marblehead.patch.com/articles/this-week-s-grown-ups-2-fan-photos-0e909bc6#photo-10472614. I'm glad I found the photo since it gives the name of the pizza maker (Bill Reisopoulos). That way, I can address him by name the next time I visit his pizzeria. The two other men in the photo are Shaquille O'Neal and Peter Dante, both of whom were in uniform for a movie in which they appeared as actors (http://www.imdb.com/media/rm2652086528/nm0200601).

You are correct that the Marblehead House of Pizza pizzas do not exhibit the crusting of the cheese at the edges. I discovered the same lack of crusting of the cheese in other Greek style pizzerias I visited. So, it is not unusual.

Peter


Offline norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #534 on: May 27, 2013, 06:31:24 PM »
Norma,

The pizza maker I spoke with at the Marblehead House of Pizza is shown at the right in the photo at http://marblehead.patch.com/articles/this-week-s-grown-ups-2-fan-photos-0e909bc6#photo-10472614. I'm glad I found the photo since it gives the name of the pizza maker (Bill Reisopoulos). That way, I can address him by name the next time I visit his pizzeria. The two other men in the photo are Shaquille O'Neal and Peter Dante, both of whom were in uniform for a movie in which they appeared as actors (http://www.imdb.com/media/rm2652086528/nm0200601).

You are correct that the Marblehead House of Pizza pizzas do not exhibit the crusting of the cheese at the edges. I discovered the same lack of crusting of the cheese in other Greek style pizzerias I visited. So, it is not unusual.

Peter

Peter,

Thanks for the link to the photo to show who the pizza maker at Marblehead House of Pizza was.   Being opened for 44 years is quite an accomplishment. 

I only discovered Greek style pizzas from Steve, but I thought most of them had had that crusting of cheese at the edges.  Interesting to know that some other pizzerias you visited also had that lack of crusting of cheese.

Norma
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Offline cmyden

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #535 on: June 14, 2013, 04:59:46 PM »
As an update on my quest to replicate the Greek Style pizza found here in Western Alberta, I ran across another pizza joint named Niko's that makes pizza that is nearly identical to my beloved Atlas.

(pics below)

After many attempts, I've been unable to replicate the coloring and texture of the cheese at home.  It might just be impossible with a standard oven!


Offline CDNpielover

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #536 on: June 20, 2013, 04:55:08 PM »
cmyden, you should make a visit to Niko's and see if you can find out if they are using the same convection-type pizza oven as is used at Atlas.  That will give evidence for or against the convection oven theory.

Offline nicu2001

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #537 on: September 24, 2013, 09:31:05 AM »
Hi guys,

I have not made a greek pizza in about a year and want to make one this Friday.  I am planning to mix the dough tonight and cold ferment for three days.  I have only made this style based on reply 20 from Pete-zza:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,691.msg27482.html#msg27482

Given that it is 7 years later, I was wondering if anyone who has experimented with different Greek formulations could offer what they think is the best dough for this style?  Stick with reply 20?

If it helps in your recommendation, I will be cooking these in a gas oven that gets to about 550-575 and have both a baking steel and a pizza stone that I can use.  I have 1" steel pans.  Flour is All Trumps.

Thanks in advance!

Offline nicu2001

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #538 on: September 30, 2013, 08:10:23 AM »
My Greek pizza revisit was a success.  I used the original from reply 20 with great results after a 3 day cold ferment.  Differences this time are that I now have two 3/8" steel plates to work with.  1 hour preheat with the oven on max at 500 and the bottom steel plate was 585 and the top was 535.  I am looking forward to trying NY style this week on the plates.  My only complaints would be that I could have used a little more cheese and maybe somehow gotten the crust a little less soft.  The bottom was perfect though.

Offline norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #539 on: December 21, 2013, 03:26:32 PM »
If anyone is interested in the other photos of Greek style pizza that was made in the Blackstone unit the photos and the formulation I used starts at Reply 346 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,26483.msg293479.html#msg293479 

Norma
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Offline Simple Man

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #540 on: January 25, 2014, 08:14:26 AM »
Here is my attempt at Peter's Greek Style following instruction from reply#20. The only difference was the use of KABF vs. the KASL.

May not look perfect but it was a big hit with the family. I will definitely use this recipe again.

One was straight peperoni (Hormel), the other was bacon, feta (and 50/50 Mozz/white cheddar) and greek olives.
Dave

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #541 on: February 28, 2014, 03:21:37 PM »
My Greek pizza revisit was a success.  I used the original from reply 20 with great results after a 3 day cold ferment.  Differences this time are that I now have two 3/8" steel plates to work with.  1 hour preheat with the oven on max at 500 and the bottom steel plate was 585 and the top was 535.  I am looking forward to trying NY style this week on the plates.  My only complaints would be that I could have used a little more cheese and maybe somehow gotten the crust a little less soft.  The bottom was perfect though.
nicu, how much oil did you put in your pan and did you proof the dough for a period in this pan?
Thank you, you did a good job.  :drool:

Bob
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Offline Stavs

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #542 on: September 23, 2014, 08:47:12 PM »
Here are a couple "New England Style" Greek pizzas from my area (Philly area). The top one is actually from a place called New England Style Pizza and the bottom one is from Thunderbird Pizza.

Offline nicu2001

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #543 on: November 18, 2014, 08:19:26 PM »
nicu, how much oil did you put in your pan and did you proof the dough for a period in this pan?
Thank you, you did a good job.  :drool:

Bob

Sorry for such a late reply and thank you!!

I used 1 tablespoon of oil in the 12" pan and covered and proofed for 2 hours.

Just made some greek dough for Friday pizza night which made me think of this thread. I'll try to post pics of the finished pizzas on Friday.

Offline bigMoose

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #544 on: January 06, 2015, 06:12:32 PM »
After reading this thread for many months... I thought it was time to make some Greek Pizza!  Recipe used was from PMQ as revised by Peter into a small batch http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,691.msg181438.html#msg181438  100g of flour was used for the 9 inch round pan; 170g of GM Full Strength for the 9x12 pan.  I did use 0.75% IDY however as I had a cold kitchen... it is 10 degF outside this morning.  Pans were coated with butter flavor crisco.  Oven was preheated to 450 degF with a stone.   After a first rise, dough was spread realitively easily in the pans.  it was as thin as a NY dough.  After 2.5 hours pan rise in my cool kitchen I was suspect.  However this dough about doubled in height after a few minutes on the stone!  I baked it for about 14 minutes.

Both my wife and I enjoyed it... especially the corner pieces.  This recipe is a keeper, and this style is now available to guests!  ;D

Offline norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #545 on: January 06, 2015, 07:24:14 PM »
Dave,

Your Greek style pizzas look delicious!  Your one even looks like a Detroit style pizza.  That was a different idea to try!   8)

Norma
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Offline bigMoose

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #546 on: January 06, 2015, 07:29:38 PM »
Thanks Norma (and Criag too!), that means a lot from you!  I will definately put an attempt at your Detroit pizza on my "to do" list for early 2015.  Thanks for the inspiration that you "trend leaders" give us by alll your research, experimentation and testing.  Thanks again for posting all those tips!  :D
« Last Edit: January 07, 2015, 03:16:19 PM by bigMoose »

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #547 on: January 06, 2015, 10:24:32 PM »
That pie looks awesome.
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Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #548 on: January 15, 2015, 09:11:59 PM »
What is the emoticon for "drooling outloud"? :drool:  Oh wait there it is.

Offline The Lord Of The Pizza

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #549 on: March 21, 2015, 12:58:23 PM »
Hello all!  I am trying my hand at the wonderful formulation for Greek Style from Pete found here (reply #401): http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=691.msg181657#msg181657
with the IDY percentage suggestion for a cold ferment that Pete and CDNPielover arrived at, 0.5% found here (Replies 409 and 410): http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=691.msg182059#msg182059

I plan on a minimum 2 day ferment with possibly longer depending on when I am ready to make the pizza.

[Equipment]

- 9 Inch heavy and thick black steel cake pan
- Food processor
-Oxo Digital Scale
- Oven Heated at 550
-Pastry Brush
[Ingredients]

Dough:

- King Arthur Bread Flour
- water
- instant dry yeast
- salt
- olive oil
- soybean oil
- sugar

Cheese:

- Whole Milk mozzarella-2 ounces
- Sharp Cheddar-2 ounces

I like this combo personally and decided to go with it.

Sauce:

- Kenji's New York Style Pizza Sauce with dried Basil added
http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2010/10/new-york-style-pizza-sauce.html

I use this sauce on just about everything.  I really love the sweetness and richness of it.  I also use Vidalia onions in the onion part as it releases their sweetness into the sauce which I really love!

Toppings:

- Food Lion Pepperoni-14-17 slices
- Black Olives-8 sliced

Other:

- canola or olive oil for brushing the pan.  Have not decided yet but am leaning towards Canola.  1 1/2 teaspoons with a pastry brush.

[Dough Formulation for 2,  9" pizzas]

New England Greek Pizza
Flour (100%):    198.68 g  |  7.01 oz | 0.44 lbs
Water (50.8561%):    101.04 g  |  3.56 oz | 0.22 lbs
IDY (0.5%):    0.99 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.33 tsp | 0.11 tbsp
Salt (1.77188%):    3.52 g | 0.12 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.04 tsp | 0.35 tbsp
Olive Oil (0.4%):    0.79 g | 0.03 oz | 0 lbs | 0.18 tsp | 0.06 tbsp
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (3.6%):    7.15 g | 0.25 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.57 tsp | 0.52 tbsp
Sugar (2.1093%):    4.19 g | 0.15 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.05 tsp | 0.35 tbsp
Total (159.23728%):   316.38 g | 11.16 oz | 0.7 lbs | TF = 0.08771
Single Ball:   158.19 g | 5.58 oz | 0.35 lbs


[Dough Preparation, approximately 48 hours before Pizza Day or longer]

- Into the bowl of the food processor, add 198.68 g of flour, 4.19 g of sugar, and 0.99 g of IDY.  Process flour, sugar, and yeast in food processor until combined, about 3 seconds.

- With processor running, slowly add 101.04 g of water (Temperature around 90-95 degrees; process dough until just combined and no dry flour remains, about 10 seconds. Let dough stand for 10 minutes.

-Add 0.79 g Olive Oil, 7.15 g Vegetable Oil,  and 3.52 g salt to dough and process until dough forms satiny, sticky ball that clears sides of work bowl, 30 to 60 seconds.

- Put dough in fridge for approximately 48 hours or longer.

[Sauce Preparation]

-New York Style Pizza Sauce  http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2010/10/new-york-style-pizza-sauce.html

[On Pizza Day]

- Transfer dough to floured counter and cover with plastic wrap and allow to warm to room temperature for 1 hour.

- Liberally oil the 9" pizza pan with canola oil. 1 1/2 teaspoons with a pastry brush.

- Press dough out into the pizza pan.

- Allow dough to rise at room temp in the pan for an hour and 40 minutes.   Start pre-heating the oven at 550F about an hour into
  this dough rising process.

- After the hour and 40 are up, transfer pan with dough to top of preheating oven, for about more 20 minutes of rising.

-  Using a Pastry Brush, apply sauce all the way to the edge, followed by toppings.

- Apply 50:50 blend (mozzarella / sharp cheddar) of cheese, right to the edge.

- Cook for 9-13 minutes on  the bottom rack in the 550 degree oven.




This will be my layout and procedure.  I really liked cmyden's clear layout and procedure on Reply #502  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=691.msg237622#msg237622  and decided to adopt it as a template for my recipe and anyone wanting to know what I am doing.  It also makes recipe sharing really easy!  I hope they don't mind borrowing the layout!  I love it!

Wish me luck!
« Last Edit: March 21, 2015, 02:42:53 PM by The Lord Of The Pizza »
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