Author Topic: Greek pizza  (Read 105592 times)

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Offline ERASMO

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #80 on: May 01, 2010, 12:14:37 PM »
Thanks for the reply

I did not oil the pan.  I normally do for my sicilian pies but wanted to try the greek without.  I know the type of bottom the oiled pan gives with the sicilian and the greek pizza I have had did not seem to have that type of bottom.  I tried to follow the procedure of the recipe as best I could.  I used a 454 gram ball for 13.5" chicago metallic non stick deep dish pizza pan.  The pans are fairly new.

I should have taken photos but did not. 

also, I used that so strong flour and we are going to try the GM full strength next time.

All in all we were very happy with the outcome.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #81 on: May 01, 2010, 12:26:51 PM »
ERASMO,

It sounds like your deep-dish pan is tapered. Is that correct?

If you used 454 grams of dough for your 13.5" pan, that translates to a thickness factor of about 0.11188 (it may be a bit different if your pan is tapered).

Did you use the granulated garlic also, or maybe the powdered form instead?

Peter


Offline ERASMO

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #82 on: May 01, 2010, 12:29:42 PM »
OOPS,  I forgot--I did not put the garlic in the dough.

Yes tapered pan.

Online norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #83 on: May 05, 2010, 06:57:47 AM »
Steve (Ev) made this Greek Style or bar pizza, yesterday.  We used my camera, that is why I am posting these pictures.  Steve will explain when he sees this all about the pizza.  He said he was trying this pizza to recreate a memory from his childhood.

In my opinion this was a really different kind of pizza.  The crumb was very soft.  I really enjoyed Steve’s pizza.   :)

Norma
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Online norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #84 on: May 05, 2010, 06:58:47 AM »
remainder of pictures

Norma
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Offline ERASMO

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #85 on: May 05, 2010, 07:27:04 AM »
Norma
Thanks for posting that.

Steve,
Please do tell about your pie!

Looks like you achieved a crispy bottom.  What was your process?

Thanks

Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #86 on: May 05, 2010, 12:48:58 PM »
First of all, I need to thank Norma for posting the pictures and more so for letting me work in her shop with her. She is so generous with her supplies and equipment and lets me make whatever I want in her oven.

 I found this thread last week and was reminded of a place called Cape Cod style pizza in Ridley township, Delaware County, Pa.   It's been about 40 years since I last had it but I remember it as being completely unlike any other pizza in the area. All the various descriptions in this thread are pretty much just how I remember it.
 The pizza I made yesterday was my first attempt at this style and based on Peters recipe on page 2. The only changes I made were to use KABF and shortening in the pan instead of olive oil. Also, even though I knew this to be out of place, I used a small amount of Feta along with mozzarella and sharp cheddar in an approximate 40/40/20 blend.

The dough mas made the previous evening and cold fermented about 18 hours. Room temp proof was about 2 hours.
I wouldn't call the crust crispy on the bottom, but firm. As you can see in the photos, the perimeter was nice and crispy with the combination of slightly burnt cheese and sauce.
 The overall flavor was quite good, I thought, but not exactly what I remember. I'll bake another tomorrow, only without the Feta and probably mostly cheddar.

Offline scott r

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #87 on: May 05, 2010, 01:45:48 PM »
guys, this pizza looks really close to the real deal.    It does appear to be a bit thicker than what you usually find around southern new england, so if you want to get even closer you might also want to drop the dough ball size down a bit.   Good luck!

Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #88 on: May 06, 2010, 11:59:50 AM »
Well, my friends....I've just had what you might call a "Eureka" experience. I made another pie today, and I gotta say that if this is not the same as I remember, then it's better! I can't imagine any better result than what I achieved today! Alright, now that I got that out of my system.......the pie.
 
This is the same dough as the last, except of course now it's about 60 hours old. This time I used a light coating of olive oil in the pan instead of shortening. The cheese blend is 5oz. Biery brand mild white cheddar and 3 oz. Grande East Coast blend. I'm sure at this small amount, any decent mozz. will do. Also, I used this pie as a vehicle to test a brand of pepperoni which I've never tried. "Battistoni Maria Pepperoni" It's a smaller diameter pep. than usual. About an inch. It has a very nice mild flavor. Not overpowering at all. A little greasy perhaps, but you'll have this with pepperoni.
 Anyway, I pre-heated my stone to 500 for an hour and cooked the pie in the pan, on the stone for about 6-8 minutes. Sorry I didn't time it exactly. The bottom did crisp up a little better than the first pie but just a bit. Inside, the crust is still tender and moist. The browned edge, while crispy, almost seems to melt in your mouth in a greasy carmelized conglomeration of cheese and sauce. Hungry yet?Ok, the photos.........

Online norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #89 on: May 06, 2010, 12:06:33 PM »
Steve,

Your Greek Pizza looks delicious!  :)  Wish I could have tasted it.  Great photos, too. 

Norma
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Offline ERASMO

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #90 on: May 06, 2010, 12:08:59 PM »
Looks great

Yum

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #91 on: May 06, 2010, 01:28:50 PM »
Steve,

That is a great looking pizza. I especially like the cheesy rim. What type and brand of flour did you use for the pizza? 

I went back to the dough recipe I believe you used, at Reply 20 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,691.msg27482.html#msg27482, to look at the amount of sugar. At 2%, I think that that would be enough for a 60 hour cold ferment. However, you might try increasing the sugar a bit the next time to see if that gives you more bottom crust browning, if that is what you want. In most cases, to get a really crispy bottom (again, if that is what you are after), the easiest way to do it is to use more oil in the pan, to effectively "fry" the bottom crust. That is how Pizza Hut does it (or used to do it) for its pan pizzas.

In your case, did you use the same dough weight and pan size as given in Reply 20 referenced above, or did you change things to accommodate another pan size?

Peter

« Last Edit: October 29, 2010, 05:05:30 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #92 on: May 06, 2010, 01:52:06 PM »
Peter,

 I used King Arthur Bread flour. I'm really happy with the way this turned out. I suppose I could play with the sugar amount a bit, just to see what happens, but 1 more minute in the oven might do the same thing.
 Yes it was the recipe in reply #20 that I used. I used the dough calc. to scale it to a 10" pan. The dough weight was 245g.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #93 on: May 06, 2010, 02:41:24 PM »
Steve,

If you'd like to try out the Greek style pizza that was given at the PMQ Think Tank at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=5022&p=29426&hilit=#p29426, using the same pan size and dough ball weight (245 grams), according to the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, the dough formulation would look like this:

Flour (100%):
Water (48.5%):
ADY (0.31%):
Salt (1.45%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (10%):
Sugar (3.25%):
Total (163.51%):
149.84 g  |  5.29 oz | 0.33 lbs
72.67 g  |  2.56 oz | 0.16 lbs
0.46 g | 0.02 oz | 0 lbs | 0.12 tsp | 0.04 tbsp
2.17 g | 0.08 oz | 0 lbs | 0.39 tsp | 0.13 tbsp
14.98 g | 0.53 oz | 0.03 lbs | 3.3 tsp | 1.1 tbsp
4.87 g | 0.17 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.22 tsp | 0.41 tbsp
245 g | 8.64 oz | 0.54 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: No bowl residue compensation

I intentionally left out the granulated garlic in the above dough formulation, but at 0.75%, it would come to 1.1238 grams, or about 0.04 ounces. I don't have a conversion factor for granulated garlic but for a generic garlic powder the conversion factor is 1 t. = 0.09405 ounces. So, for garlic powder, the amount to use would come to a bit less than 1/2 teaspoon (0.42 t.). If what I have read that a teaspoon of granulated garlic is equivalent to a half teaspoon of garlic powder is correct, then I suppose you would use 0.84 teaspoon of granulated garlic, or a bit less than 7/8 teaspoon. That strikes me as being a lot for a dough ball weight of 245 grams, especially since Tom Lehmann once recommended 0.15% garlic powder for a pizza dough, at his PMQ Think Tank post at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7797&p=53267&hilit=#p53267.

I also assumed in the above dough formulation that the oil is soybean oil. I am not sure what oil is typically used in Greek style pizza doughs, but the numbers for an oil other than soybean oil, or a combination of oils, will not be materially different than what is recited in the above dough formulation.

Peter

« Last Edit: May 06, 2010, 03:31:25 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #94 on: May 06, 2010, 03:13:41 PM »
Thanks Peter. I will absolutely give that recipe a try. Is there a particular flour that you would recommend?

Steve

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #95 on: May 06, 2010, 03:48:43 PM »
Steve,

As has been noted before, the flours used to make Greek style doughs are by and large bromated flours. However, since you used KABF before, I think I would use that and compare your results with the Greek style pizza that you last made. It will be important that you use the dough preparation and management methods described in the aforementioned PMQ dough recipe since the recipe apparently was developed to work with those methods.

As I noted previously, the last Greek style pizza place I visited in Massachusetts used 7 ounces of dough (with a bromated flour) for a 10" Greek style pizza. The dough formulation for that amount of dough and pizza size is as follows:

Flour (100%):
Water (48.5%):
ADY (0.31%):
Salt (1.45%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (10%):
Sugar (3.25%):
Total (163.51%):
121.37 g  |  4.28 oz | 0.27 lbs
58.86 g  |  2.08 oz | 0.13 lbs
0.38 g | 0.01 oz | 0 lbs | 0.1 tsp | 0.03 tbsp
1.76 g | 0.06 oz | 0 lbs | 0.32 tsp | 0.11 tbsp
12.14 g | 0.43 oz | 0.03 lbs | 2.67 tsp | 0.89 tbsp
3.94 g | 0.14 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.99 tsp | 0.33 tbsp
198.45 g | 7 oz | 0.44 lbs | TF = N/A
Note: No bowl residue compensation

The amount of dough for the above dough formulation, and the last one as well, is so small that you will perhaps have to make the dough by hand or possibly in a food processor.

Peter


Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #96 on: May 06, 2010, 05:18:45 PM »
Thanks Peter. Maybe I'll try them both. The later would be in agreement with scott r's assessment that the pie should be thinner anyway. That last pie sure was good though.  :chef:

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #97 on: May 06, 2010, 05:36:16 PM »
Steve,

That would be great. I've searched the Internet quite a bit in the past looking for Greek style/pub dough recipes as popularized in the Northeast but there is a dearth of them. There are plenty of pizza recipes calling for uniquely-Greek toppings and cheeses but not for the Greek/pub style pan dough itself. It would be nice to have a few more recipes for that style on the forum to give our members a few options that might stimulate even more recipes as they modify them like they do all of the other styles on the forum.

Peter

Offline Ronzo

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #98 on: May 06, 2010, 08:27:21 PM »
Ev, that pie is beautiful. I've never had Greek pizza, but I'd scarf yours down before you could get a slice. ;)
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Offline Ev

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #99 on: May 07, 2010, 12:19:24 AM »
Thanks Ron, I appreciate that! :)  It really was very very good. I'm sure I'll be making this, and the afformentioned variations again soon. Good luck beating me to it! ;)