Author Topic: Take Home & Bake Fundraiser Question  (Read 2837 times)

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Offline LHall

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Take Home & Bake Fundraiser Question
« on: June 08, 2009, 09:21:41 AM »
First day to look at this site and I have that "wow" experience!

Maybe this has been discussed a lot before and I just don't know the words to search with.

I am interested in a church fundraiser where we build unbaked pizzas.  Some will be cooked in hours, while others will go into the freezer. 

Can you offer dough and preparation advice to make a decent pizza that can be baked at home and/or frozen & thawed?

Is there a good dough recipe for this?

Are there things I need to consider in the preparation to make sure the quality is good when cooked?

Any other advice will be greatly appreciated.

And like many of you when you first saw this site, I'm in awe!


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Take Home & Bake Fundraiser Question
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2009, 10:15:07 AM »
LHall,

This can be a tricky endeavor and you need the facilities, including adequate commercial cooler space, to pull off a successful fundraiser based on take-and-bake pizzas.

From what I have read, some pizza operators, usually independent pizza operators, use their regular pizza dough to make take-and-bake versions. That is, when an order is placed for a take-and-bake pizza, they use their regular dough to make a dough skin, dress it, put it on a carrier of some sort (usually a specially designed baking tray or parchment paper/cardboard arrangement), and wrap it in plastic (with an instruction sheet) to go. Without a carrier that can sustain the oven heat needed to bake the pizza, consumers would have to have pizza stones, peels or other equivalent baking methods. Very few do. So, I would view a heat-resistant carrier to be a necessity. Usually such carriers are sold only to professionals and they can be quite expensive.

Companies that specialize almost exclusively in take-and-bake pizzas build their entire businesses around a product that is not only satisfying to the consumer when baked in a home oven but that can also tolerate a fairly wide range of abuse by consumers (one of which includes freezing the pizzas). Some time ago, I researched this subject and made a few take-and-bake pizzas based on my research. To get a better understanding of the issues involved, you might take a look at Replies 343, 347. 349, 355 and 362, starting at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg21101.html#msg21101. You might also need to read some of the intervening posts because othere members interjected their own posts on the same or other matters. For some take-and-bake dough formulations that Tom Lehmann of the American Institute of Baking recommends, see http://www.pmq.com/tt2/recipe/view/id_165/title_All-Purpose-Pizza-Dough-Formulation-for-Take-and/ and http://www.pmq.com/tt2/recipe/view/id_164/title_Thick-ín-Buttery-Crust-Formula-For-Take-and-Bake/. I am pretty certain that the coated leavening mentioned in these recipes is a product called WRISE. It is a commercial product sold only to professionals although I am sure that small quantities can be obtained for test purposes.

You will have to decide whether either of the above options is practical for your fundraising purposes.

Making pizzas to be frozen is a topic of its own--one that comes with many options and its own set of issues and problems. As noted above, take-and-bake pizzas are not intended to be frozen.

Peter

EDIT (3/22/13): For the updated links to the above PMQ recipes, see http://www.pmq.com/Recipe-Bank/?additionalinfo=Pizza+Dough&areaname=&searchcustomdata=

« Last Edit: March 22, 2013, 09:18:57 AM by Pete-zza »


 

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