Author Topic: Good ol' home oven  (Read 10428 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline MazzisPieLvr

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 9
Re: Good ol' home oven
« Reply #60 on: August 27, 2008, 04:23:19 PM »
Quote
What are the odds that someone gets struck by lightning while baking a pizza?


We just had a story in the news of a guy who got struck by lightning when he rang a doorbell at the same time lightning struck the house.  :o So DON'T BAKE A PIZZA IN A LIGHTNING STORM...j/k.


Offline November

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1877
  • Location: North America
  • Come for the food. Stay for the science.
    • Uncle Salmon
Re: Good ol' home oven
« Reply #61 on: August 27, 2008, 04:30:37 PM »
I arrive at the conclusion because these are industrial shelves designed for heavy use in a factory. If they can take that kind of punishment without lots of customer complaints I assume that they can handle the task. If they are more susceptible to cracking, its not by much.

I don't get the "industrial" and "heavy use" references.  Neither reference is used on the web page in any description.  They are simply kiln shelves.  They are not immune to mechanical and thermal stress, which is why some of them have slits.  You'll notice though that the shelf we were talking about does not have slits.  It would be more susceptible to cracking than a thicker shelf of the same length and width.  That makes it less valuable than a thicker shelf in my opinion, and that's all I was trying to convey.

- red.november

Offline Pizza_Not_War

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 388
  • Location: Portland OR
Re: Good ol' home oven
« Reply #62 on: August 27, 2008, 04:35:48 PM »
red.november

So now that you have dispensed with the electrocution dangers how about describing your actual baking procedures with the Silicon shelf. Are you cooking with the broiler on while the pizza is in the oven or is the heat from the Silicon surface so hot that it is charring the top of the pizza? I know you stated that you heat from above with the broiler as heating from the bottom would be a waste.

PNW

Offline November

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1877
  • Location: North America
  • Come for the food. Stay for the science.
    • Uncle Salmon
Re: Good ol' home oven
« Reply #63 on: August 27, 2008, 06:04:28 PM »
I know you stated that you heat from above with the broiler as heating from the bottom would be a waste.

Baking Procedure: 1) Preheat the shelf with the broiler. 2) Place pizza on shelf. 3) Pull pizza out when baked.

Offline MazzisPieLvr

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 9
Re: Good ol' home oven
« Reply #64 on: August 27, 2008, 06:33:16 PM »
Quote
It would be more susceptible to cracking than a thicker shelf of the same length and width.

I am wondering though, in real pizza baking use with the much lower temperatures if this is true to a degree that would result in a much higher percentage of cracked shelves. It would be good to know in case you wanted to use two thin shelves so that it would be lighter to just take out the top shelf for cleaning.


I have been looking at pizza stones on the net and found a 14 5/8" round one with handles at Target for 14.99 that would probably do a fair job, but I'll bet it would be no comparison to the SiC shelves.


Offline Pizza_Not_War

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 388
  • Location: Portland OR
Re: Good ol' home oven
« Reply #65 on: August 27, 2008, 06:45:53 PM »
Baking Procedure: 1) Preheat the shelf with the broiler. 2) Place pizza on shelf. 3) Pull pizza out when baked.
Curiosity made me order one!

RN- would you know if the shelf can handle direct flame contact. For example a Fibrament stone cannot be place on the grill without a pan or other blocking of the flame.

Thanks

PNW

Offline November

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1877
  • Location: North America
  • Come for the food. Stay for the science.
    • Uncle Salmon
Re: Good ol' home oven
« Reply #66 on: August 27, 2008, 06:57:16 PM »
I am wondering though, in real pizza baking use with the much lower temperatures if this is true to a degree that would result in a much higher percentage of cracked shelves. It would be good to know in case you wanted to use two thin shelves so that it would be lighter to just take out the top shelf for cleaning.

SiC shelves are not cheap.  Regardless of the starting percentage of cracking probability, a 0.375" thick shelf is 40% more likely to crack than a 0.625" thick shelf.  I've seen 0.75" shelves break into several pieces from just falling over, so again, immune they are not.  So here's the math even using your wishful 40% discount: $64.00 x 2 = $128.00 - 40% = $76.80 versus $79.75.  A savings of $2.95 on a shelf that is 40% weaker along one axis.  It just doesn't work for me.

- red.november

Offline November

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1877
  • Location: North America
  • Come for the food. Stay for the science.
    • Uncle Salmon
Re: Good ol' home oven
« Reply #67 on: August 27, 2008, 07:35:18 PM »
Curiosity made me order one!

RN- would you know if the shelf can handle direct flame contact. For example a Fibrament stone cannot be place on the grill without a pan or other blocking of the flame.

As one would expect, results may vary, but I'm anxious to hear from someone else on their results.

SiC is used in direct flame impingement environments, so I'd say so.  FibraMent stones are not designed to take extreme temperatures like traditional refractory materials, so the radiant heat must be kept at bay.  I suspect FibraMent can't withstand the extra heat because of the fabric laminations within the stone.  This is what Mark at FibraMent had to say about extreme baking temperatures: "It is not necessary for baking stones to have a temperature rating that exceeds 750 F."  So if you agree with him, it wouldn't matter.

- red.november
« Last Edit: August 27, 2008, 07:37:54 PM by November »

Offline Essen1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3277
  • Location: SF Bay Area
    • The Hobby Cook
Re: Good ol' home oven
« Reply #68 on: August 27, 2008, 08:09:48 PM »
Quote
SiC is used in direct flame impingement environments, so I'd say so.  FibraMent stones are not designed to take extreme temperatures like traditional refractory materials, so the radiant heat must be kept at bay.  I suspect FibraMent can't withstand the extra heat because of the fabric laminations within the stone.  This is what Mark at FibraMent had to say about extreme baking temperatures: "It is not necessary for baking stones to have a temperature rating that exceeds 750 F."  So if you agree with him, it wouldn't matter.

RN,

Now that makes me wonder how the stones in my LBE are going to hold up with all the insulation that's going to go in. Bottom's a Fibra-D and top is a BGE. SiC might be a better option.


Btw, 1 lb of the Resbond came in today. It'll be a fun weekend  ;D
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Pizza_Not_War

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 388
  • Location: Portland OR
Re: Good ol' home oven
« Reply #69 on: August 27, 2008, 08:15:53 PM »
I can see the next line of T-Shirts being printed....   SIC_Kookers


Offline November

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1877
  • Location: North America
  • Come for the food. Stay for the science.
    • Uncle Salmon
Re: Good ol' home oven
« Reply #70 on: August 27, 2008, 08:50:07 PM »
I can see the next line of T-Shirts being printed....   SIC_Kookers

How about: "Need the heat?  Call in SiC."

Offline Essen1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3277
  • Location: SF Bay Area
    • The Hobby Cook
Re: Good ol' home oven
« Reply #71 on: August 27, 2008, 08:58:25 PM »
RN & PNW,

You mean something like this?

Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline Pizza_Not_War

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 388
  • Location: Portland OR
Re: Good ol' home oven
« Reply #72 on: August 28, 2008, 09:56:51 AM »
RN & PNW,

You mean something like this?


What took you so long? LOL

PNW


 

pizzapan