Author Topic: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe  (Read 18012 times)

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Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #40 on: October 22, 2008, 11:07:39 AM »
Hi Pete
Thanks once again

With regards to your reply, I have a few more questions regarding each point.

2) If my understanding is correct, what you are saying is I should measure out the IDY, Salt and Sugar using something like a Tea spoon rather than using my Scale. Do correct me if I am wrong on this point. By the way do u get a special spoon that has multiple measurements on it for example, 1/10 of a teaspoon or 2/10 of a teaspoon. This would be a great tool, as a measurement like 0.4 Tsp would just measure on this type of a spoon as 4/10 of a teaspoon. This may be asking too much but I don't think it is impossible.

3,4,6) On my next attempt I would stir in the oil with the water, salt and sugar mixture. Then add the flour gradually while stirring on speed 1 using my Beater Attachment (A picture of which I have posted in a previous post). This stirring should continue for around 2 mins and not too much longer. I then fit my Dough Hooks and knead with that for a further 4-5 Minutes.
To feel a bit satisfied I think I will hand knead after this step for about a minute and no longer just to make sure the feel of the dough is correct. I am certain this will solve the problems I have had with my previous attempt.

Regards
Cinnamos


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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #41 on: October 22, 2008, 12:32:38 PM »
Cinnamos,

Re 2), yes. I have a standard set of measuring spoons, including one-tablespoon, one-teaspoon, half-teaspoon, one-quarter teaspoon and one-eighth teaspoon. I also have a set of mini-measuring spoons such as shown at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5583.msg47264.html#msg47264. These range from one-quarter teaspoon to one-sixty-fourth teaspoon. I usually round out or estimate the volume measurements given in the dough calculating tools if they don't fit my measuring spoons exactly. Since fractions are taught in U.S. schools in about the 4th or 5th grade, I assume that most people can execute this task.

With respect to your mixer issues, I don't know if your mixer times will be the same as mine using a stand mixer. You will just have to go by feel in your case.

Peter

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #42 on: October 23, 2008, 03:47:00 AM »
Hi Pete
Thanks for that info
Thats exactly what I need.

Hopefully tonight, I will have some more time on my hands and thought I would try making recipe #6. I was just thinking of doing a 24hr cold fermentation rather than 3 day as I require the pizza for tomorrow night. Is the recipe in #6 structured to allow for a 24 hour fermentation or does some ammendments need to be made.

Regards
Cinnamos

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #43 on: October 23, 2008, 09:49:26 AM »
Cinnamos,

Recipe #6 should be OK for a 24-hour fermentation.

Peter

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #44 on: December 24, 2008, 05:59:25 AM »
Hello Pete
I hope all is well with you.

I have made this again.
This time I went for a 2 Day fermentation as I felt it tasted better the last time compared to 3 day.
I have 1 quick question.

I have access to an oven that goes right up to 300 Degrees Celsius.
At what temp would you suggest I bake the pizza and approx how long should I bake it for.

Regards
Cinnamos

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #45 on: December 29, 2008, 12:31:54 PM »
Cinnamos,

I don't know which of the seven (or more) dough recipes I gave you is the one you are now using, but maybe it doesn't really matter all that much. I think I would use 260 degrees C, which is equivalent to 500 degrees F. For the small sizes of the pizzas you have been making, you might even try using a slightly lower oven temperature. Ovens vary, so I can't tell you how long to bake the pizzas. You will have to just experiment until you get things right. Have you tried any of the potato-based recipes yet and, if so, what the results were?

Peter
« Last Edit: December 29, 2008, 12:33:35 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #46 on: January 08, 2009, 06:13:07 AM »
Hi Pete
I hope u are good

I got your reply a bit late that day as I had already baked the pizza by then but anyways here is what I did and the results.

First I used Recipe #1 with a few alterations. I made 3 pizza's in total.

Pizza 1
80% Bread FLour + 20% Semolina

Pizza 2
50% Bread flour + 50% Cake Flour

Pizza 3
80% Cake Flour + 20% Semolina

The balance of the ingredients were as follows.

Water (55.555%):                              70.04 g  |  2.47 oz | 0.15 lbs
IDY (0.88885%):                                 1.12 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.37 tsp | 0.12 tbsp
Salt (1.75%):                                     2.21 g | 0.08 oz | 0 lbs | 0.4 tsp | 0.13 tbsp
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (4.27199%):     5.39 g | 0.19 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.19 tsp | 0.4 tbsp
Sugar (1.875%):                                 2.36 g | 0.08 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.59 tsp | 0.2 tbsp
Total (164.34084%):                           207.18 g | 7.31 oz | 0.46 lbs | TF = N/A

The method for each dough was as follows.

1) Added water, Salt and Sugar to mixer bowl and stirred for 30 sec till fully dissolved.
2) Added oil to water mixture and stirred for 30 Sec till fully dissolved.
3) Mixed IDY and Flour in a separate bowl.
4) Using beater attachment I slowly added in flour and kneaded with beater attachment for approx 2 minutes till dough left the sides of the mixer bowl.
5) Replaced beater attachment with dough hooks and kneaded for about 4 to 5 minutes. I periodically stopped the kneading processing after 3 minutes to check if the dough is OK and usable. At around 4.5 minutes I found the dough soft, easy to handle and tacky but not sticky. When i removed my finger from the dough, no dough was stuck to my fingers. I figured that all is OK.
6) I hand kneaded dough for about a minute and shaped into a ball. I left standing for 5 minutes while I oiled my PAN.
7) After oiling my pan I rolled out dough using rolling pin to the desired size and placed into oiled pan. I placed the pan into a plastic packet and straight into my refrigerator.

The same method was followed for Pizza 2 and 3.

42 Hours later I was ready to use the pizza.
Took out from fridge and left outside for about an hour. I then topped it with sauce, chicken and cheese.
Put it into the oven on temp 230 Degrees Celsius.
I put all 3 Pizza's into the oven at the same time.
They baked for approx 25 minutes.

Up until this time all was OK.
At 20 Minutes I found that the cheese on the pizza began to burn and harden. The pizza most affected was the one with plain cheese and no other toppings. I guess thats because the other pizza's had toppings which delayed the browning of the cheese but hey I aint no scientist. Just a blind guess.

Anyways I was forced to take out the pizza because the chicken and pepproni pizza's cheese started to brown and burn as well.

Heres what I found.
The pizza did not stick to the pan. It removed itself quite easily.
When cutting it you could feel the softness and slight crispiness on the crust. Just one problem I found.The pizza was breaking apart very easily. If you were to pickup a slice it would break and in some instances even crumble in your hand. I cant understand why but would take another blind guess at saying it was due to  under baking it.

Any advice on how to avoid this in the future.

In terms of the taste it was soft on the inside, quite airy, and chewy just how I wanted it. The crust was very very slightly crispy. The color of the crust was a very light brown colour. Normally Romans Pizza is a dark brown to almost turning blackish color like burned. Other than that I was fairly pleased with the results and I guess I am 1 step closer to perfecting it.

Anyways Take care and Best Regards. Looking forward to hearing from you.
Cinnamo's

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #47 on: January 08, 2009, 08:16:17 AM »
Cinnamos,

I see a couple of problem areas.

First, you changed the flour component of the recipe. You should have been OK with the 80/20 bread flour/semolina flour blend for Pizza 1 because the total effective protein content of that blend, assuming typical U.S. flours, is around 12.2% (I used the Harvest King bread flour and Bob's Red Mill for the calculation). However, when you used the 50/50 bread flour/cake flour blend for Pizza 2 and the 80/20 cake flour/semolina blend for Pizza 3, you dramatically altered the recipe since the blend for Pizza 2 has an effective total protein of 10% and the blend for Pizza 3 has an effective total protein of 8.98%. What brings down the protein content in both cases is the low protein content of cake flour, which in the U.S. is around 8% (e.g., for the King Arthur cake flour). Cake flour offers much less gluten development than bread flour or semolina flour and, hence, less strength to the final baked product. It will be cake-like and likely to break apart in your hands or on the plate, much as you appear to have experienced. In using the cake flour blends for Pizzas 2 and 3, you perhaps should also have altered the hydration values for the dough formulations for those Pizzas to reflect the reduced absorption characteristics of the cake flour. That would result in a stiffer dough with less resistance to falling apart when baked.

I would rather see you stick with the original recipes than to alter them to accommodate the use of cake flour, which takes us down a new path of exploration which I would prefer not to pursue. However, if you wish to use cake flour and proceed on your own, that is your call. You can use member November's Mixed Mass Percentage Calculator at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/ to create whatever flour blend you would like to use with whatever protein content you find acceptable.

Second, you perhaps should not have baked all three pizzas at the same time in your oven, especially with the different combinations of toppings. There are some people who have the ovens and oven management skills that permit them to bake multiple pizzas at one time, even with different toppings combinations, but that is not the method I use with my oven. I bake pizzas one at a time. That allows me to control one pizza at a time to get the desired results for that one pizza.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 15, 2013, 09:15:55 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #48 on: January 09, 2009, 03:02:12 AM »
Hi Pete
Thanks for pointing out my mistake.

At the time it didn't strike me that using a weaker flour than bread flour would significantly affect the final outcome of the pizza. Never the less I have learned something and actually thankful that I have made this error as the next time I don't have bread flour on hand (yes, I didn't have enough bread flour and cake flour was the next best thing) I would wait to get some before creating a disaster using some other flour.

With regards to pursuing this recipe using cake flour, I think I would pass on that. Without your guidance, it will be quite futile.

Anyways thanks again for the advice
I always look forward to it
I am planning to make this soon and will inform you of the outcome.

Regards
Cinnamo's

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #49 on: January 09, 2009, 07:24:56 AM »
Cinnamos,

I don't want to discourage you from doing any experimentation with your dough recipes, including trying cake flour. It's just that it has been a very long time since I last played around with cake flour for pizza and I would prefer not to give you advice that is based solely on memory.

If you do a forum search on cake flour, you will find several posts on its use in pizza doughs, although maybe not exactly in the context of a thick crust pizza. In your case, you might treat cake flour in a pizza dough as a separate side project.

Peter


Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #50 on: January 09, 2009, 07:51:24 AM »
Hi Pete

You haven't discourage me in anyway. No disrespect to anyone else on this forum, but if you are not going to be directly involved in any of my experimentation, then I wouldn't want to diverse into those sections of pizza making. Until I perfect on whats already available, and specially those topics that you can assist with, I would stick soley with that. Once I gain some experience and understand why each method is done in the specific order that it calls for as well as the scientific reasoning for each ingredient, I would stick to the very basic knowledge that I already have.

Also once I build up on the correct set of utensils as well as appliances needed to create the perfect pizza, then I could experiment further. My therm is on its way so I guess I could try another Pappa John Pizza soon.

Regards
Cinnamos
« Last Edit: January 09, 2009, 07:54:17 AM by cinnamos »

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #51 on: January 12, 2009, 02:40:09 AM »
Hello Pete
Good news

I managed to locate a supplier of  Vital Wheat Gluten
I thought it comes in a liquid form but the guy says it comes in a powder form so my assumption is its Gluten Flour.
 
What % of VWG should be used to a specific amount of flour.

Also would it make a significant difference in substituting VWG for Semolina which I am currently using.

I also forgot to mention that this company sells many other dough Strengthening and Conditioning products.
Would you need me to try other ingredients on my pizza to see the difference from what it already is like?

Regards
Cinnamo's
« Last Edit: January 12, 2009, 02:56:45 AM by cinnamos »

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #52 on: January 12, 2009, 08:56:36 AM »
Cinnamos,

The amount of vital wheat gluten (VWG) to use, to be accurate, depends on the protein content of the particular brand you will be using. Typically, the protein content of VWG products is around 65-75%. As you will see from the forum's Pizza Glossary at http://www.pizzamaking.com/pizza_glossary.html, semolina flour and vital wheat gluten are two different animals, so their effects on the dough will be entirely different.

The amount of VWG to use is either the recommended volumetric amounts specified by the producer of the VWG (e.g., so many teaspoons for a specified volume of flour) or a more accurate measurement, by weight, calculated mathematically. I usually use the mathematical approach, and for this purpose I use member November's Mixed Mass Percentage Calculator at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/. That calculator allows one to determine the amount, by weight, of the VWG to add to a quantity of flour having a particular protein content to achieve a final blend with a particular target protein content. If you can ascertain the protein content of the particular brand of VWG you will be using, I can help you with the tool. To make the best use of the tool, you will also want to know the protein content of the base flour to which you will be adding the VWG, or at least the general type (e.g., all-purpose flour, bread flour, etc.).

For now, I would hold back on investigating other dough additives. However, if you can provide a list of what they are, I can look at the list to see if there is anything on that list that you might consider at some point down the road.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 15, 2013, 09:13:45 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #53 on: January 13, 2009, 01:50:21 AM »
Hello Pete

Here is a list of what this company supplies

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A
   Abimono 40 V / VS
   Abimono 90 V
   Abitec PGPR
   Abitec SS 40
   Abitec SSL 80% (Sodium Stearyl Lactylate)
   Abitem V80 GB (Datum Ester)
   Ammonium Bicarbonate FG
   Ascorbic Acid - various grades
   Aspartame
   Azodicarbonamide
 
   B
   Beta Carotene 10%
   Brown Sugar
   Buttermilk Powder
 
   C
   Calcium Phosphate Di Basic
   Calcium Phosphate Mono Basic
   Calcium Phosphate Tri Basic
   Calcium Propionate
   Calcium Sulphate Food Grade
   Caramel Powder
   Citric Acid Anhydrous BP / USP
   Citric Acid Monohydrate BP / USP
   Cocoa butter replacer
   Cocoa butter substitute
   Cocoa Powder
   Coconut oil
   Corn Starch
   Cream of Tartar
 
   D
   Datum Esters
   Demineralized Whey Powder
   Dextrose Monohydrate
   Di Calcium Phosphate
   Divider Oil
 
   E
   Egg Powder
   Emulsifiers
   Enzymes - Various
 
   F
   Food colours - Various
   Full Cream Milk Powder
   Fungal Amylase (Petronase 5000)
   Fats - various
 
   G
   Gelatine Edible - Various
   Glucose Liquid
   Gluten Vital Wheat
   Glyceride Mono and Di
   Glycerol Monostearate Acid Stable
   Glycerol Monostearate SE / NE
 
   H
   Heavy Mineral Oil
 
   L
   Light Mineral Oil
   Liquid Paraffin
 
   M
   Maize Starch
   Malto Dextrine
   Mineral Oil Heavy
   Mineral Oil Light
   Mono Calcium Phosphate
 
   P
   Palm kernal oil
   Palmacid 5516
   Petronase 5000
 
   S
   Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate
   Sodium Benzoate B.P.
   Sodium Bicarbonate USP/FG
   Sodium Metabisulphite
   Sodium Stearyl Lactylate
   Soya Lecithin Food Grade
   Starch Maize
   Starch Wheat
   Stearic Acid - All Grades
   Sugar - Brown /White
 
   T
   Tri Calcium Phosphate FCC,NF
 
   V
   Vital Wheat Gluten
 
   W
   Wheat Gluten
   Wheat Starch
   Whey Powder
   Whey Powder Demineralized
   White Mineral Oil Heavy
   White Mineral Oil Light
   White Sugar
 
   X
   Xanthan Gum
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Let me know if anything there is worth using

Regards
Cinnamos

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #54 on: January 13, 2009, 12:24:00 PM »
Cinnamos,

Thank you for the list.

Most of the ingredients in the list are intended to be used for commercial applications and to address specific problems that professionals have in making commercial products. For example, several of the ingredients are used for frozen dough formulations and to address problems making frozen doughs and combating problems such as bread spoilage (e.g., mold) and staling.

For now, I don't see any need to use other ingredients on the list, other perhaps than to look at the possibility of using vital wheat gluten to supplement your local all-purpose flour. We might also choose to look at using a bit of ascorbic acid (Vitamin C) for dough strengthening purposes and to get a bit more rise out of your doughs. But that can wait also.

Peter

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #55 on: January 16, 2009, 03:20:03 AM »
Hi Pete

The company from which I am going to purchase my VWG informed me that the Minimul Protein Content of the VWG is at 75%. Could you in the mean time assist me finding out how much of VWG I need to add in for Recipe #1

Flour (100%)
Water (55.555%):                              70.04 g  |  2.47 oz | 0.15 lbs
IDY (0.88885%):                                 1.12 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.37 tsp | 0.12 tbsp
Salt (1.75%):                                     2.21 g | 0.08 oz | 0 lbs | 0.4 tsp | 0.13 tbsp
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (4.27199%):     5.39 g | 0.19 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.19 tsp | 0.4 tbsp
Sugar (1.875%):                                 2.36 g | 0.08 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.59 tsp | 0.2 tbsp
Total (164.34084%):                           207.18 g | 7.31 oz | 0.46 lbs | TF = N/A

Regards
Cinnamo's

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #56 on: January 16, 2009, 09:43:28 AM »
Cinnamos,

It looks like you forgot something in the dough formulation you posted. If it is Recipe #1, that would be the 126.07 grams (4.45 oz.) of flour. However, I note that that recipe already calls for a blend of bread flour and semolina flour. It would not make much sense to supplement that flour blend with vital wheat gluten (VWG) because its protein content is already at around 12.22% (based on a typical bread flour and typical semolina flour). Any VWG added to that blend while keeping it in the bread flour protein range is very likely to be minuscule (maybe 1/3 teaspoon). If you add a meaningful amount of VWG to the bread flour, that will push the target protein content of the blend into the high-gluten flour range, which may not be suitable for the recipe you plan to use. Unless your bread flour is low on protein for some reason (there can be fairly wide variations from one brand of flour to another), there would be little reason to supplement it with VWG. In my opinion, it would only make sense to supplement a lower protein flour like all-purpose flour to raise its protein content to the bread flour protein level. You might recall that the original recipe from which this thread evolved calls for using bread flour.

Please let me know how you wish to proceed. If it so happens that you decide to use all-purpose flour and supplement that flour with VWG, if only to get some experience using VWG, you will want to note if there is anything on the flour bag that specifies the amount of protein for a given serving size (e.g., "x" grams of protein for a 1/4-cup serving). Those numbers may not be precise but good enough for our purposes. Other information that would be helpful is the weight per sample size of the brand of VWG you will be using. For example, for one popular retail brand of VWG in the U.S., Bob's Red Mill brand, 1/4 cup of their VWG weighs 30 grams: http://www.bobsredmill.com/product.php?productid=3552. That information will allow us to convert the weight of VWG needed to supplement your base flour, which may too small to measure on your scale, to a volume measurement. As it so happens, the Bob's Red Mill brand of VWG also has a protein content of 75%.

I will await your reply before proceeding further. 

Peter

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #57 on: January 19, 2009, 06:29:00 AM »
Hi Pete
Good to hear from you.

Oops Sorry about that. I did forget the flour measurement in my previous post.

Now regarding the use for VWG, If you remember in Reply 15 of this post, I mentioned that My first attempt produced a fairly favorable pizza but a few things were missing and one was the chewiness. it just wasn't there. At the time, VWG was not available and the only alternative was Semolina which works exceptionally well, No doubt.

Also, in reply 16 you mentioned something to the effect, that use of semolina flour would not produce the type of chewiness and taste I am after, as many commercial pizzerias don't use semolina.

Well since I now finally have VWG available to me, I thought let me take this whole experience from a different angle and to a whole new level.What I would like to do is slowly push my flour from a Bread Flour Category into a High Gluten Flour category. By Slowly, I mean with each attempt I would do this to compare the difference. If I remember correctly, My bread flour is 12% protein. What I would ideally do is push it up to 12.5% and increase my 0.5% on every attempt.

At this very time I don't have on hand the VWG as well has My Bread Flour. Once I do I will post to you the "amount of protein for a given serving size" as you requested.

I will also weigh out the 1/4 cup of VWG.

With these experiments, it would ultimately help me in understanding how VWG affects flour and how High Gluten Flour affects the overall outcome of Pizza.

Also a thought had just come to mind. On one of my attempts, I cant remember which one it was, I decided to go for a 3 day cold fermentation to improve the flavor of the crust. I notice that by the end of the first day, my pizza already risen by 70% at the least. So by the middle of the second day, probably approximately 36 Hours, the pizza was double in its pan. When it came to the third and final day, it looked like the pizza had over fermented. How I came to this conclusion is when I placed a flat spatula underneath the pizza which was still in the pan to see if its stuck, it began to break into pieces and some if not most of the pieces began to stick to the pan. Well, I didn't lift much of it, just a small area just so I could inspect. I didn't interfere any further. I just topped it and baked it. After the baking, it seemed fine. Some portions of the pizza stuck to the bottom of the pan but I was able to remove the pizza completely from the pan before destroying it.

I'm just going to digress for a moment. When I attempted the Pappa Johns clone, in the first day I noticed that the dough had risen to double it size. In the second day it rose to 3 times its size. By the third day and final day, it became one big disaster. When trying to remove the dough from the container which it was placed in, it stuck to the container.

I am assuming that if I had to try and remove my pizza from its pan I would have experience similar results like the Pappa Johns attempt. I found one common denominator which passed the eye. The dough temp. I never thought it was so important up until now. You learn something new every day.

Never the less, My question is simply, what should the final dough temp be, before it is placed in the fridge for a 3 Day fermentation. Also take into account the heat that is transferred when rolling the dough out to its desired size so it can be placed into the PAN and then refrigerated.

Thanks again for all your help

Regards
PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #58 on: January 20, 2009, 09:49:43 AM »
PizzaManic,

I'd like to first clarify a point with respect to the semolina. In Reply 16, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6984.msg62334.html#msg62334, I did not say that the semolina would not provide the type of chewiness and taste you were after. If you re-read my post, you will see that I said that You may also find that the chewiness that the semolina flour produces is not the type of "chewiness" you are after. Semolina will, in fact, produce a chewy characteristic in the finished crust. However, as I noted, it may not be the same "type" of chewiness you are after.

If you are interested in increasing the protein content of the bread flour you are using to approach that of high-gluten flour, you would use a targeted protein content of about 14.2%. If you start with the 12% protein content of your flour and increase it by only 0.5%, to 12.5%, the amount of VWG you would need to use for that purpose, assuming a flour weight of 127.07 grams, would be very small--a bit more than 1/3 teaspoon (0.40 t. for the Bob's Red Mill brand of VWG). If that is what you would like to do and then increase the amount of VWG in 0.5% increments, that is fine. However, if that is the case, you will want to practice using November's Mixed Mass Percentage Calculator at http://foodsim.unclesalmon.com/ so that you learn how to do the calculations yourself at your own pace and convenience.

With respect to your question about finished dough temperature, I would shoot for a finished dough temperature of around 75 degrees F (about 24 degrees C). It is possible that you will add a few degrees to the dough temperature as you roll it out and place it into your pan but if your room temperature is lower than 75 degrees F, it is possible that your dough will also cool down because of the lower room temperature. In your case, I suggest that you use a water temperature that will get the finished dough temperature to about 75 degrees F (about 24 degrees C) and actually measure the finished dough temperature to see how close you came to the calculated value. There are factors beyond room temperature, flour temperature and machine frictional heat that can affect the finished dough temperature.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 15, 2013, 09:11:28 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Pan Pizza Soft & Light Recipe
« Reply #59 on: January 21, 2009, 02:51:20 AM »
Hello Pete

I'm hopefully gonna get the VWG by today. I am also going to buy my Bread Flour as well. I'm totally out. I saw two types of bread flour. One with 12% protein and one with 11% protein. The one with 12%, I already tried. I am thinking of trying the one with 11%. Its more for experimental purposes as these are the 2 major brands of bread flour easily available and it would assist in knowing the difference.

Regarding November's Mixed Mass Percentage Calculator, I think this would be the perfect opportunity for me to finally learn how to use these tools. Once I am ready with all my Ingredients as well as my thermometer, I will let you know. I will also have the nutritional facts available. Then if it isn't too much trouble, we could go through the process together so I understand how to use the calculator.

Anyways take care and we will keep in touch.

Regards
PizzaManic