Author Topic: Authentic Naples Dough as possible  (Read 17932 times)

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Offline artigiano

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Re: Authentic Naples Dough as possible
« Reply #60 on: August 15, 2008, 11:05:48 PM »
Hi Peter,

That is a nice link, thanks.  I know there are many factors that contribute or create different issues in the dough.  You answered my question with this link as I was interested in seeing something like this for learning purposes.  I find even slight variations can sometimes produce quite different results in the finsihed pizza so this will help me in determining which adjustments created the variation in the dough.

thanks,
Al


Offline JimmyMak

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Re: Authentic Naples Dough as possible
« Reply #61 on: August 16, 2008, 06:38:47 PM »
 anyone know if different fresh yeasts or idy produce different flavor.

Offline fabio

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Re: Authentic Naples Dough as possible
« Reply #62 on: August 16, 2008, 06:41:59 PM »
Absolutely, yes. As does HOW you use them.

Offline JimmyMak

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Re: Authentic Naples Dough as possible
« Reply #63 on: August 16, 2008, 06:52:17 PM »
what brand of fresh yeast do you like

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Authentic Naples Dough as possible
« Reply #64 on: August 16, 2008, 07:52:26 PM »
anyone know if different fresh yeasts or idy produce different flavor.


JimmyMak,

I know that bakers and pizza operators have their personal preferences when it comes to the form of yeast, but some time ago, Tom Lehmann said that he and his colleagues ran side by side tests at the American Institute of Baking (where he works) using fresh yeast, ADY and IDY, and they couldn't detect a difference in the finished crusts.

The above said, Marco discussed the use of IDY versus fresh yeast at Reply 23 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,861.msg8959/topicseen.html#msg8959.

Peter
« Last Edit: August 16, 2008, 07:56:00 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline artigiano

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Re: Authentic Naples Dough as possible
« Reply #65 on: August 16, 2008, 09:41:46 PM »
As I make a transition from my ap/ pastry simulation neaoplitan style pizza to Caputo flour I find that an advantage in making the larger batches with the room temp fermentation is that the dough balls stay much softer.  A problem I encountered at times with the 24 hr refrigeration process with the ap/pastry is that the dough sometimes came out a little chewier than I wanted after baking even in the brick oven.  I believe this was due to the time the dough mass was waiting to go into the fridge when I was cutting and balling all of my dough balls before refrigeration.  I did leave them uncovered for an hour on each side before covering them with saran wrap.  I have parties in which I prepare 25 dough balls by hand and I believe this period in which the dough mass sits there as the balls are prepared are leading to an overall over-fermentation after I hand knead the mass.  To cut and ball 25 dough balls on my own can take me about a half hour and I have to measure it on the scale.  I do leave the dough balls to come up to room temp after the fridge before baking.  When I use the room temp caputo I have an easier time making a close approximation to the desired 9oz dough ball which is nice when cutting and balling and usually dont have to use the scale.  I am not sure as to the exact reason but its probably how the dough handles after the intitial approximate 18 hour room temp rise.  I could be wrong by some of my assumptions but always love to hear other thoughts or advice.

thanks,
Al

Offline artigiano

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Re: Authentic Naples Dough as possible
« Reply #66 on: September 06, 2008, 10:39:04 AM »
Hi guys,

I have followed the advice from this thread and found that cutting the fresh yeast from 1 gram to 1/3rd gram was much better.  I do think it might have been too much and I should maybe now try 1/2 gram.  I was also wondering as to why my pizza dough becomes tough after a while (I used this recipe in the home oven and not the brick oven at 500 degrees this time as I didnt have time lately to fire up the brick oven).  I find this can happen even with the brick oven that the dough can become tougher after a while.  Sometimes it is nice and crisp and doesnt change much and other times it can become tougher.  I think it might be a question of if it is underhydrated.  I may have been confusing overhydrated with overfermented, but in this case I followed this recipe exactly and still have had this issue... even though it is inline with the suggested hydration for Caputo dough.

850g caputo
500ml water
25g sea salt
1/3 gram yeast (but will now try 1/2g)

18 bulk rise - wrapped in plastic which worked great as per advice from forum
3 hour individual ball rise under blankets which did not form any crusting and dough was nice and soft.. after a 1/2 hour i noticed them starting to become crustier on the skin

thanks,
Al
« Last Edit: September 06, 2008, 10:49:00 AM by artigiano »