Author Topic: "Dare to be Different" Pizzas  (Read 10192 times)

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Online Pete-zza

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"Dare to be Different" Pizzas
« on: December 18, 2004, 11:03:59 PM »
I decided to start this thread today to showcase pizzas that go beyond the more traditional pizzas--like the NY style thin-crust, deep-dish, cracker crusts and so forth.   It's not that I don't like those pizzas.  I am very fond of them, and they are the mainstay of my pizza portfolio.  However, from time to time, I like to try something that stirs the few creative juices I have.  As I come up with pizzas that I feel others will enjoy as much as I have, I plan to post the recipes along with photos, so that just about anyone can make them too.  And I invite others to do the same on this thread if they are so inclined.  

I will start today with an oyster pizza (see photo below).  I happen to love oysters but they don't often reach the center of Texas.  But when they do, I grab them and make the following recipe.

Oyster Pizza

Pizza dough sufficient for one 12- to 14-in. pizza
One doz. freshly-shucked oysters (or an 8-oz. container, very well drained)
3 T. butter
5 cloves of garlic, sliced thinly
2 medium-sized jalapenos, diced (for high heat, leave seeds and membranes)
4 to 6 oz. Monterey Jack cheese, very thinly sliced or grated

Melt the butter in a skillet and add the oysters (very well drained) and garlic.  Sauté until the garlic is cooked but not browned, and the oysters are firm.  Distribute the oysters and garlic over the unbaked pizza crust, and drizzle the melted butter all over.  Add the diced jalapenos and Monterey Jack cheese and bake on a pizza stone that has been preheated for 1 hour in a 500-550 degree F oven, until the pizza crust is browned and the cheese is melted, about 7-9 minutes.

Just about any dough recipe can be used for the above pizza, but for this type of pizza I like a chewy, yet open and airy crust with nice browning of the crust.  To achieve these characteristics, I decided to use a dough made from a combination of all-purpose flour and cake flour, and with a high hydration level.   As will be noted below, the recipe calls for the use of a stand mixer.  However, I usually use (and prefer) a food processor (pulse feature only) since it handles small amounts of dough better than a stand mixer.  But whether I use a stand mixer or a food processor, I process the dough only until it forms a smooth ball with a tacky feel to it.  If I find it necessary to make minor adjustments, I do it right in the bowl, a teaspoon at a time, or I remove the dough from the bowl and make the final adjustments on a lightly floured work surface.  The dough can also be make by hand.  

Dough Recipe for Oyster Pizza

3/4 c. water (6.25 oz.), around 105-115 degrees F
1/2 t. active dry yeast   
1 1/2 c. (6.90 oz.) all-purpose flour, unbleached
1/2 c. (2.05 oz.) cake flour (such as Softasilk or King Arthur Guinevere)
1 t. salt
1/8 t. sugar
Olive oil, for coating the dough ball

Combine the water (warm) and yeast in a small bowl and proof until foamy, around 5-8 minutes.  Put the yeast mixture in the bowl of a heavy-duty stand mixer fitted with a dough hook.  Combine the flour, salt and sugar and add gradually to the yeast mixture in the mixer bowl.  The dough ingredients should be kneaded at low speed until no longer sticky and the dough forms a ball that is smooth and soft, about 5-8 minutes.  Shape the dough into a round, place in a lightly oiled bowl, and turn to coat.  Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rise 4 hours in a warm place.  Punch the dough down, brush lightly with oil, cover completely with plastic wrap, and let rise another 2-4 hours.  

When ready to prepare the pizza, shape the dough ball into a pizza round (12-14 in.) by pressing your fingertips into the dough, leaving the edges puffy to create a rim (cornicione).  Grasp the rim with your hands, working your way around the circle.  The dough will be highly extensible with little elasticity, so it should be easy to pull, stretch and shape.  As the dough dangles, it stretches by the force of gravity while the edge stays plump.  (If the dough is too extensible, it can be shaped into a round entirely on the work surface, and the rim can be shaped by hand.)

The oyster pizza was extremely satisfying, with all the characteristics I had hoped for--a nice chewy, open and airy crust and with nice crust browning, both on the bottom and at the rim.  The long fermentation period (a total of 6-8 hours) contributed a lot of flavor, and the jalapenos added a nice amount of heat, without overtaking the other flavors of the pizza and without detracting from the star of the show--the oysters.    

Here's the photo of the finished product.

Peter





« Last Edit: December 18, 2004, 11:05:53 PM by Pete-zza »


Offline Steve

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Re:"Dare to be Different" Pizzas
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2004, 07:46:34 AM »
Looks great! Isn't Pepe's in New Haven famous for a clam pizza?
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Offline Trinity

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Re:"Dare to be Different" Pizzas
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2004, 09:54:41 AM »
 ::)

Yeah that's what I was thinking. :)

Looks so good... I can almost taste it. Drool!!!
It's an Earth food. They are called Swedish meatballs. It's a strange thing, but every sentient race has its own version of these Swedish meatballs! I suspect it's one of those great universal mysteries which will either never be explained, or which would drive you mad if you ever learned the truth.

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Re:"Dare to be Different" Pizzas
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2004, 10:01:37 AM »
This was my attempt at being different. ;D

Pizza with shrimp... Turned out great!!! ;D
« Last Edit: December 19, 2004, 10:12:33 AM by Trinity »
It's an Earth food. They are called Swedish meatballs. It's a strange thing, but every sentient race has its own version of these Swedish meatballs! I suspect it's one of those great universal mysteries which will either never be explained, or which would drive you mad if you ever learned the truth.

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Re:"Dare to be Different" Pizzas
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2004, 10:02:44 AM »
And the results!!!! :o

I was happy with this one!!! :)
It's an Earth food. They are called Swedish meatballs. It's a strange thing, but every sentient race has its own version of these Swedish meatballs! I suspect it's one of those great universal mysteries which will either never be explained, or which would drive you mad if you ever learned the truth.

Offline Trinity

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Re:"Dare to be Different" Pizzas
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2004, 10:11:35 AM »
I have been thinking about making a "Chilli pie",,, Or to put it another way. A pizza topped with a can of chilli with beans,,, (Or homemade).
  Topped with tomatos, green peppers, a few sliced jalapenos, some well drained sweet corn, black olives. And colbyjack cheese To top it off!!!
 All on a "kinda" deep dish crust. :)


Hmmm.... Sound good???
« Last Edit: December 19, 2004, 10:24:40 AM by Trinity »
It's an Earth food. They are called Swedish meatballs. It's a strange thing, but every sentient race has its own version of these Swedish meatballs! I suspect it's one of those great universal mysteries which will either never be explained, or which would drive you mad if you ever learned the truth.

Online Pete-zza

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Re:"Dare to be Different" Pizzas
« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2004, 11:08:40 AM »
Pepe's is credited with having "invented" the clam pizza, and is one of its signature dishes.  Pepe's supposedly uses freshly-shucked clams.  Lombardi's also has a clam pizza but I have read of complaints that the clams don't look freshly-shucked, and they looked more like canned clams.

I have made clam pizzas before, and I am sure that the oyster pizza recipe would work as well with clams if the clams are fresh.  It's almost impossible to get fresh clams in central Texas.  I have tried the canned clams, even some of the upscale ones from Blue Crab Bay Co. (a name I suspect Steve is familiar with), and they are an improvement but not as good as the fresh clams.

Trinity's combination of shrimp and pepperoni is an interesting one and looks tantalizing.  The Portuguese and Cajuns are well known for combining seafood with chicken, sausage and other meats.  

Peter

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Re:"Dare to be Different" Pizzas
« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2004, 11:27:19 AM »
How about a paella pizza!  ;D

Shrimp, clams, mussels, squid (calmari), sausage, green pepper... now there's a combination to put on top of a pizza!
« Last Edit: December 19, 2004, 07:08:30 PM by Steve »
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Offline Trinity

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Re:"Dare to be Different" Pizzas
« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2004, 12:32:40 PM »
 ::)

If you made it... I would try it!!! ;D  


Errm,,, mussles,,,,never tried???
It's an Earth food. They are called Swedish meatballs. It's a strange thing, but every sentient race has its own version of these Swedish meatballs! I suspect it's one of those great universal mysteries which will either never be explained, or which would drive you mad if you ever learned the truth.

Offline DKM

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Re:"Dare to be Different" Pizzas
« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2004, 11:15:52 AM »
I have lost respect for all of you!  ;)
I'm on too many of these boards


Offline Foccaciaman

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Re:"Dare to be Different" Pizzas
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2004, 11:29:41 AM »
DKM:

As long as we have you to keep one foot based in the world of traditional pizza we know that you will be there to reel us back in from the non-conformist Twilight Zone of pizza toppings. ;D

JWB
Ahhh, Pizza The Fifth Food Group

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Re:"Dare to be Different" Pizzas
« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2004, 04:45:49 PM »
Thanks  ;D
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline Lars

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Re:"Dare to be Different" Pizzas
« Reply #12 on: December 20, 2004, 05:55:18 PM »
The very first pizza I had was in Shreveport, Louisiana in 1964, and it had shrimp on it and was very good, although I generally don't like shrimp with cheese.

I tend to make thicker crust pizzas than most others here, I think, but I also like to make calzone, or at least my version of it.  It travels and reheats well, which is why I make it.

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Re: "Dare to be Different" Pizzas
« Reply #13 on: April 13, 2008, 04:56:19 PM »
I decided recently to make a Rosemary Chicken and Potato Pizza such as described at http://www.recipesource.com/main-dishes/pizza/rosemary-chicken-potato1.html. The recipe given there is the same one described at pages 19-20 of The California Pizza Kitchen Cookbook, by Larry Flax and Rick Rosenfield, the founders of California Pizza Kitchen. In my case, I adapted the quantities of the cheeses and toppings to accommodate a 14" pizza size, and in lieu of a CPKI dough I used an experimental same-day poolish-based adaptation of the basic Lehmann NY style dough formulation. I also substituted dry rosemary and thyme for fresh, which I did not have on hand (and could not find at my local supermarket). The pizza turned out well.

Photos are shown below. If possible, I suggest that fresh rosemary be used. Having made this pizza several times before, the fresh rosemary really helps make this dish. The butter sauce also contributes to the overall results.

Peter

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Re: "Dare to be Different" Pizzas
« Reply #14 on: June 20, 2009, 06:08:32 PM »
A few years ago, I thought it would be interesting to make a pizza using chicken livers. Since I have always liked all kinds of liver and onions in general, I thought that those two ingredients would go together well on a pizza. When I did a Google search at the time, I did not find any chicken liver pizza recipes. However, when I updated that search recently, I saw that there were now a few chicken liver pizzas, including one using a tomato based sauce. But none like the one I had in mind. So, I just made up my own. I decided to use a combination of fresh chicken livers dusted in a seasoned flour mix and lightly sauteed in butter, caramelized sweet Texas onions, a combination of lightly sauteed sliced mushrooms (flavored with some Harvey's Bristol Cream sherry) and raw sliced mushrooms, minced garlic (sauteed in butter), shredded low-moisture, part-skim mozzarella cheese, and dried thyme for added flavor.

For the dough, I decided to use an experimental dough that I devised for another member but which seemed suitable for the chicken liver-based pizza. The formulation and instructions for that dough are presented at Reply 27 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8685.msg75983.html#msg75983. A typical photo of the finished pizza is shown below; other photos that were submitted for the July 2009 "Family Supper" Monthly Challenge appear at Replies 3 and 5 starting at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8658.msg75948.html#msg75948. I know that this pizza seems weird but I was surprised at how good the pizza tasted.

Peter
« Last Edit: June 20, 2009, 06:11:22 PM by Pete-zza »


 

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