Author Topic: convection ovens  (Read 7996 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: convection ovens
« Reply #20 on: September 20, 2008, 04:19:31 PM »
I don't know for a fact, but I would guess the holes in a perforated cutter pan are smaller than the openings in a screen.  One must be a real careful baker to avoid any affect on the cutter pans perforated holes I would think. But whatever.


BTB,

Actually, the holes in a typical perforated cutter pan, such as the one I have from pizzatools.com (lloydpans.com), are quite large, as you will see from the last photo in Reply 249 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,1911.msg51105.html#msg51105. There are a few things that you can't really do well with a perforated cutter pan, such as using cornmeal. Also, you have to be careful not to oil the bottom too heavily such that the oil leaks through the holes and drips down onto whatever is below the cutter pan in the oven.

Peter


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: convection ovens
« Reply #21 on: September 20, 2008, 05:38:00 PM »
BTB,

It occurred to me after I posted that you may have something in mind like the "Mega" screens that American Metalcraft and others sell. See, for example, http://www.amnow.com/pizzaTrays/megaScreens.html.

Peter

Offline November

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Re: convection ovens
« Reply #22 on: September 20, 2008, 05:45:33 PM »
November, I think its quite easy for crumbs, melted cheese, corn meal, or whatever to fall into the cracks, crevices and perforated holes of a cutter pizza pan.  [...]  I don't know for a fact, but I would guess the holes in a perforated cutter pan are smaller than the openings in a screen.

These two statements don't belong in the same post.  If you've never used a perforated pan, and moreover are guessing that the holes are smaller than on a screen, I don't know why you would think it's easy for food to get stuck in the holes.  A lack of information only supports a very questionable opinion.

It can't be too easy as I have been using a perforated pan for about 16 years and not once have I ever gotten anything stuck in the holes.  That's a long time for something to not happen when it's supposed to happen easily.  I think the only reasonable explanation for having sauce or cheese even coming in contact with the pan (whether it sticks or not) is Curt's:

Due to laziness or impatience, I have been know to cut a pie right out of the oven.

Which is something I would never do or recommend doing with a quality pizza pan.  I've had pans around for a long time and wish to have them around for a lot longer, so I just use them to bake on and I leave the cutting for a cutting board.

- red.november
« Last Edit: September 20, 2008, 05:47:50 PM by November »

Offline November

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Re: convection ovens
« Reply #23 on: September 20, 2008, 05:46:32 PM »
It occurred to me after I posted that you may have something in mind like the "Mega" screens that American Metalcraft and others sell. See, for example, http://www.amnow.com/pizzaTrays/megaScreens.html.


And yet those holes are still rather large.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: convection ovens
« Reply #24 on: September 20, 2008, 05:53:26 PM »
And yet those holes are still rather large.

November,

That is true. The Mega screens are the only type of screen (anodized or otherwise) that I could recall that are intended to be used in lieu of the usual aluminum pizza screens. I don't think that many pizza operators use them, especially the anodized versions. They are quite expensive.

Peter

Offline jiminvegas

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Re: convection ovens
« Reply #25 on: October 15, 2008, 05:58:12 PM »
Hi all this is my first post here..I have been using my convection oven for several years to make pizza..the one thing I seem to do different than most here is I use a pizza stone... @ 450 for 9 minutes I get near perfect pizza everytime.
This is as close as I can get to a brick oven in my home..

Offline ctimmer

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Re: convection ovens
« Reply #26 on: October 15, 2008, 06:35:07 PM »
jiminvegas

What type of pizza do you make?

Offline Jah

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Re: convection ovens
« Reply #27 on: December 01, 2008, 05:56:58 PM »
Hi all this is my first post here..I have been using my convection oven for several years to make pizza..the one thing I seem to do different than most here is I use a pizza stone... @ 450 for 9 minutes I get near perfect pizza everytime.
This is as close as I can get to a brick oven in my home..

I too have a convection oven (Gaggenau) but will hold off posting too much about it until I have a chance to make proper dough from the recipies here...I'm waiting on some product.  I use a pizza stone but have not had good results with crisping the bottom with my Mario Batali pizza dough recipe and KA All Pupose Flour.  Again, I will hold off, but am a bit concerned as there is no lower coil to kick in...and the convection is always on.

Offline ctimmer

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Re: convection ovens
« Reply #28 on: December 02, 2008, 09:24:47 AM »
I use a pizza stone but have not had good results with crisping the bottom with my Mario Batali pizza dough recipe and KA All Pupose Flour.

I thought about using a cover over the pizza. A protected air gap over the pizza should somewhat negate the convection effect on the top allowing the pizza bottom to brown properly.

My guess is that a convection oven causes the pizza top to cook much quicker while only minimally affecting the bottom.

Curt