Author Topic: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface  (Read 16241 times)

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Offline Essen1

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #20 on: August 13, 2008, 01:02:06 AM »
RN,

I assume the price quote you posted already contain the shipping charges then?
Mike

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Offline November

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #21 on: August 13, 2008, 01:40:01 AM »
I assume the price quote you posted already contain the shipping charges then?

Yes, that's why the price I listed is higher than the price I linked to.

Offline Pizza_Not_War

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #22 on: August 13, 2008, 01:52:13 AM »
Other than the obvious warnings about staying clear of live electric in an oven with the Silicon Carbide are there any potential health issues with baking on these surfaces?

Also how would you cut one of these?

PNW

Offline Essen1

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #23 on: August 13, 2008, 01:57:57 AM »
Yes, that's why the price I listed is higher than the price I linked to.

I see.

What is actually the difference between Nitride bonded SiC and the regular SiC? I noticed, unless it's the company's image editor, that the Nitride ones are more pale than yours is.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2008, 02:00:35 AM by Essen1 »
Mike

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Offline November

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #24 on: August 13, 2008, 02:36:25 AM »
Other than the obvious warnings about staying clear of live electric in an oven with the Silicon Carbide are there any potential health issues with baking on these surfaces?

Also how would you cut one of these?

I'm not sure what you mean by "staying clear of live electric."  Are you making a reference to the fact SiC is electrically conductive?  I would say the wire racks already in your oven are far more electrically conductive.  Electrically conductive materials in your oven pose no hazard as long as your oven is in proper working order.  The same elements that heat your oven are also used to heat old-fashion range burners which come into direct contact with metal pots and pans.  If you're talking about live wires though, one shouldn't be doing anything with their oven that involves wires.

I would not have suggested this material, purchased this material, used this material, or started this thread if there were any potential health concerns specifically regarding this material and its intended use.  Silicon carbide is an extremely inert material and will not react with any acids or alkalis even at 1000F.  It has a better NFPA health rating than potassium chloride which is a substance actually intended for ingestion.

I would not recommend cutting your own silicon carbide material.  A professional with the proper cutting and safety equipment should be retained for such activities.

- red.november

Offline Essen1

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #25 on: August 13, 2008, 02:54:30 AM »
RN,

Okay. You convinced me.  I'll buy the SiC stone. As a top stone for the new lid first. How do you recommend to cut it into a 15" round shape?

And I'll report back.
Mike

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Offline November

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #26 on: August 13, 2008, 02:57:53 AM »
What is actually the difference between Nitride bonded SiC and the regular SiC?

There are actually several forms of "regular" SiC, but nitride bonded SiC is different in that to form it a mixture of silicon carbide and silicon additive is fired at around 2500F in a nitrogen atmosphere; while "regular" SiC is fused into various shapes with extreme heat and pressure.

I noticed, unless it's the company's image editor, that the Nitride ones are more pale than yours is.

It could just be lighting.  Attached is an image of a single crystal taken from the Wikipedia article on Silicon carbide.  That is its natural color and shade.  It's like a black diamond.  Different types of ceramic bonding processes may affect the appearance as well.

Offline November

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #27 on: August 13, 2008, 03:00:46 AM »
Okay. You convinced me.

I'm really not trying to convince anyone of anything.  I'm simply reporting on what this material offers.

How do you recommend to cut it into a 15" round shape?

I would not recommend cutting your own silicon carbide material.  A professional with the proper cutting and safety equipment should be retained for such activities.

Offline Essen1

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #28 on: August 13, 2008, 03:16:46 AM »
RN,

That's great info! I gotta hand it to you, the more I read your responses, the more I understand...with the exception when you use strictly science speak, though. But then again, I don't think I'm alone.  :)

Anyway, I'll give the SiC a shot.

In regards to the cutting, I'm not going to attempt it on my own. I was just wondering what you'd use to cut it into shape? A diamond cutter, perhaps?
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Offline November

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #29 on: August 13, 2008, 03:19:43 AM »
I was just wondering what you'd use to cut it into shape? A diamond cutter, perhaps?

I would follow my own advice.


Offline November

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Silicon Carbide Microwave Oven Baking Surface
« Reply #30 on: August 13, 2008, 07:21:09 AM »
Adding to the ways SiC is being used to increase the speed of cooking, Silar offers the following microwave oven inserts made of a silicon carbide composite material:

http://silarwave.com/products.html

[Note that these inserts are for commercial microwave ovens.]

- red.november

Offline November

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #31 on: August 26, 2008, 11:09:21 PM »
RE: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7066.msg60775.html#msg60775

Just to put this issue of electrical conductivity to rest, I measured the electrical resistance of my SiC shelf.  I expected it to be high since I assumed the bonding process would interfere with the usual valence electron configuration.  A single crystal of SiC may be electrically conductive, but how the individual crystals are bonded to each other has to be taken into consideration for a ceramic.  The result was an open circuit on my ohmmeter at 1 cm.  It's pretty safe to say you will have no issues with electrocution using a nitride bonded SiC shelf in an electric home oven in proper working order.

- red.november

Offline Pizza_Not_War

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #32 on: August 29, 2008, 02:21:06 PM »
Dimensions: 16" x 16" x 0.625"
Weight: 6.464 kg
Price: $127.25
http://www.seattlepotterysupply.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=31257&Category_Code=HASCS


Currently with shipping to the great state of Oregon $107.00 - I will be fast baking indoor pizza next week.

PNW

Offline November

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #33 on: August 29, 2008, 02:52:50 PM »
I will be fast baking indoor pizza next week.

PNW,

What is your oven's rated wattage for baking and broiling?

- red.november

Offline Pizza_Not_War

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #34 on: August 29, 2008, 03:25:49 PM »
PNW,

What is your oven's rated wattage for baking and broiling?

- red.november
Maytag model CWE9000BCB circa 1997. Also have a Maytag gas oven as well... the label on the oven says 120/240V 5.8 kw


PNW

Offline Pizza_Not_War

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #35 on: September 05, 2008, 12:13:06 PM »
My first impressions of the SIC - I first tested the shelf by putting on top of the 2stone pizza grill. I removed the top aluminum cover and internal top stone of the 2stone and put the 16x16 SIC over the grill. It just fit and I fired up the grill. Warm up time took longer with the SIC in place as I think it absorbed more heat than the usual thin stone that sits on top. The pizza's took a few seconds longer to bake than normal and I pretty much decided that for baking a few pizza's this would not be a good use for the SIC. It might work ok for a larger batch of pizza.

Second test was in the electric indoor oven. I put the SIC on the top shelf 3 7/8 inches from the broil element. This distance was considerably more than November's 2.36 inches and most likely accounts for my differing results. Quite frankly I forget to raise the SIC up higher, I will do so next test. It took approximately 25 minutes to get the SIC to 600+ degrees at that distance and the pizza baked in 2 minutes with the cheese nicely brown/burnt as my wife likes it. I like the fact that I can cook the top to order and turn the broiler off so the bottom can continue to bake.

Wife gave it a thumbs up, I prefer the 2stone crust at this point, but the 2stone does not always get me a fully cooked topping without a somewhat charred bottom crust.

The dough was my standard - flour (San Felice or Caputo), Ishcia starter, salt & water (62%).

Next time I will raise the shelf higher and I can see this being a very viable way to make a quick lunch for one/two pizza without having to endure the cold rains of winter.

PNW

Offline November

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #36 on: September 05, 2008, 02:57:48 PM »
PNW,

Interesting results.  Thanks for testing it.  One thing that I'd like to point out that may not be obvious is that when a material like SiC has such high thermal conductivity, it can rapidly lose its heat to the environment, not just to the pizza.  It's a lot like copper in that it can get hot fast but it can cool down fast too, making both materials (Cu, SiC) ideal for welding tips and gas burner nozzles.  So SiC isn't the kind of surface material you want preheat, turn down the heat, walk away, and use to cook a pizza on a few minutes later, at least if you want a pizza to bake as fast as possible.  In my situation, the insulation in my oven is 1970's standard and isn't very good, so the heat that the SiC loses during broil primarily escapes to the cabinet above my wall oven.  Your oven may be much better insulated which is why your top is cooking faster than your bottom when you use broil.  That and the fact you probably have a better broiler than I do.

Overall, given your setup, your outcome was probably as good as can be expected.  Based on my calculations using your SiC distance and preheat time, your broiler/insulation is about 1.6 times more efficient than mine.  If you raise it any higher, you will most certainly have to turn the broiler off before the pizza is finished.  You could probably pull off a faster bake time than I have ever gotten.

- red.november

Offline heehee61

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #37 on: September 16, 2008, 07:17:04 PM »
Just curious how SiC would affect bread baking given that it cooks so quickly

Offline November

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #38 on: September 17, 2008, 03:08:09 PM »
Just curious how SiC would affect bread baking given that it cooks so quickly

I have used it several times to bake flat breads such as naan and roti, but I don't think it would be well suited for a large loaf that requires a slow bake.

Offline Pizza_Not_War

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #39 on: October 23, 2008, 12:09:43 PM »
Finally got around to doing another SIC bake since the cold is starting to settle in outdoors. I move the shelf to a little less than 2.5 inches from the element and was surprised that the warm up time was not really much faster than previous tests. The pizzas bake fast and the top does brown / singe nicely, however my dough lacks the same qualities it gets from the 2stone grill oven.

Not sure how efficient the broil element is. As I recall from the old days the stove top electric elements would lose efficiency over time and when I would replace one things would cook faster. I wonder if the truly lose efficiency of is it a figment of my imagination?

If I continue to use the SIC I feel I need to formulate a different dough, most likely giving up on the 00 flours. Next indoor bake will be going back to the Fibrament below and cast iron pan 1 shelf up for comparison purposes.

PNW


 

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