Author Topic: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface  (Read 19533 times)

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Offline scpizza

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #50 on: April 14, 2009, 01:08:03 PM »
My understanding of the physics here is that the speed of the bottom bake is proportional to both the thermal conductivity of the surface and the temperature of the surface.  Thus a SiC stone can mimic the same fast bottom bake achieved from a high temperature surface in a low temperature (550F) oven.

What about the reverse problem observed in a high temperature (900F) oven?  Those cooking with ovens on self-clean find they must take extra steps to keep a Fibrament or cordierite stone temperature depressed, like covering it with foil and carefully managing timing.  If left alone to reach 900F these stones burn the bottom before the top is cooked.

It would seem a stone with a lower thermal conductivity than Fibrament (0.8 W/mK) or cordierite (2-3 W/mK) would be ideal for a high temperature oven.  Are there any pizza stone materials that would fit the bill?

I'm also wondering how wood burning ovens floored with firebricks that blend silica (0.9 W/mK) and alumina (~30 W/mK) exhibit no floor/top imbalance problems cooking at 900F.


Offline krup

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #51 on: May 12, 2009, 02:38:09 PM »
Never mind. You answered the last question already. 

Did you ever try using silicon carbide as a top stone in an LBE?
Did you back it w/ceramic insulation?

Regards,
Jeff
I like my pie like I like my women . . .
Hot, fast and cheap.

Offline momir

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #52 on: June 04, 2009, 05:52:51 AM »
Hi every one.My name is Momir and i am from Serbia.
I am new here but i like it very much.Good job guys.
After reading all the information about the sic surface i*v tride to gat one but it*s mission impossible back here.
So,thas enyone have some clue how to find this lovely thing in europe?
Sorry for my bad english.

Offline jknl

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #53 on: June 08, 2009, 05:15:43 PM »
Not to long ago my second stone broke(probably made of chamotte), after some time I found small business that specialized in building oven and oven equipment that will sell me a clay bonded SiC stone(35x33x2cm, max size for my oven). Does someone know how a clay bonded SiC stone compares to a nitride bonded or regular SiC stone?

So,thas enyone have some clue how to find this lovely thing in europe?

I found the small business mentioned above by browsing the online yellow pages by category. You could also try looking for kiln shelves made of SiC.

Offline pizzamatto

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #54 on: October 16, 2009, 12:09:51 AM »
There are actually several forms of "regular" SiC, but nitride bonded SiC is different in that to form it a mixture of silicon carbide and silicon additive is fired at around 2500F in a nitrogen atmosphere; while "regular" SiC is fused into various shapes with extreme heat and pressure.

It could just be lighting.  Attached is an image of a single crystal taken from the Wikipedia article on Silicon carbide.  That is its natural color and shade.  It's like a black diamond.  Different types of ceramic bonding processes may affect the appearance as well.

Awesome stuff!   I've been personally trying to hack a micro oven inside of a bigger oven, what are the blackbody properties of this stuff.   The original poster mentions fast cooking times, is that from conductive heat from the surface or is it radiating heat at a high rate?


Offline skan

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #55 on: January 18, 2012, 07:03:16 PM »
Is it the silicon carbide much more expensive than the cordierite?

I've just acquired a cordierite stone and i don't like it. I thought it was going to be a stone but it looks like a brick and it feels dirty and sandy.

buceriasdon

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #56 on: January 18, 2012, 08:00:10 PM »
In time the cordierite will become seasoned with use.
Don


Is it the silicon carbide much more expensive than the cordierite?

I've just acquired a cordierite stone and i don't like it. I thought it was going to be a stone but it looks like a brick and it feels dirty and sandy.

Offline skan

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #57 on: January 18, 2012, 08:12:44 PM »
I thought of oiling it, but it could not be a good idea as the oild would burn and leave some residue.

buceriasdon

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #58 on: January 18, 2012, 08:19:02 PM »
I've never read about seasoning cordierite but nothing in the rules says you can't. I use Saltillo tiles and always season them, same as my steel plates.
Don

I thought of oiling it, but it could not be a good idea as the oild would burn and leave some residue.


Offline November

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #59 on: January 25, 2012, 02:10:33 AM »
I thought of oiling it, but it could not be a good idea as the oild would burn and leave some residue.

Leaving residue (seasoning) is the stated goal.  However, when burning oil you have to deal with what doesn't become residue, namely the volatile compounds which diffuse into the air.  You could just as well season the stone with sugar as I documented in the post linked below.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5122.msg46827.html#msg46827

Perhaps a more interesting seasoning could be made by adding a small chunk of your favorite fermented dough to a large amount of water to dissolve into a thin liquid.  Brush the liquid on the stone and bake in the aforelinked manner.  That should get you started on the right carbon foot.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2012, 02:23:22 AM by November »

Offline johnamus

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #60 on: January 25, 2012, 10:29:14 AM »
Leaving residue (seasoning) is the stated goal.  However, when burning oil you have to deal with what doesn't become residue, namely the volatile compounds which diffuse into the air.  You could just as well season the stone with sugar as I documented in the post linked below.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5122.msg46827.html#msg46827

Perhaps a more interesting seasoning could be made by adding a small chunk of your favorite fermented dough to a large amount of water to dissolve into a thin liquid.  Brush the liquid on the stone and bake in the aforelinked manner.  That should get you started on the right carbon foot.

November,

I'm glad to see a recent post from you, while reading through the forums I've learned a lot from your posts.

Regarding seasoning of hearth surfaces, what do you recommend for seasoning steel plate that experiences temps from 550F to possibly a few hundred degrees higher?  Thanks

John

Offline November

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #61 on: January 26, 2012, 05:15:34 PM »
John,

Thank you.

Again, "seasoning" is just another way of saying leaving baked on residue.  Either let the surface season normally with use as Don mentioned; or prepare a liquid as I stated earlier, brush it on, and bake.  There's no secret formula or special process for different materials.  It's all about using whatever carbon-based components you might bake with.

- red.november

Offline magna

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #62 on: February 25, 2012, 05:04:51 PM »
This is the thread that finally got me to register on the site after lurking for so long.  :) Anyway, I came across a cheap source of new SiC kiln shelves on eBay here. At that price I decided to bite the bullet and see how it works out.

scott123

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #63 on: February 25, 2012, 05:09:58 PM »
That IS a very good price, but 14 x 16? I guess, for Neapolitan, 14 x 16 works, but for NY, that's a little small.

Offline magna

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #64 on: February 25, 2012, 06:08:59 PM »
Yeah, the size isn't perfect but I thought it would be decent enough to experiment on. Their inventory list has a few other new SiC shelves in different sizes.

scott123

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Re: Silicon Carbide Baking Surface
« Reply #65 on: February 25, 2012, 06:15:59 PM »
One of the problems with SiC is that it's hard/hard to cut (SiC is used for cutting), and, if you can cut it, it can potentially damage it structurally, so the really big sizes they carry aren't all that useful for us.

Still, I'd be very curious as to how your experiments work out.  Do you have a powerful broiler in your oven?  To achieve Neapolitan bake times with SiC you need an extremely powerful broiler- high wattage, lots of coils.